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1979 Mark Stored For 30 Years...

Hi Bill,

I have been resurrecting a 1979 Mark V that was stored for 30 years. I have replaced everything in the fuel system all the way from the tank to the carb which I bought a new carb and recently rebuilt it. I've also replaced the ignition coil, control module, distributor, plugs and wires, and battery. Car will start up fine and idle for a few minutes then cut out. I have done a compression test and am getting 140 psi give or take 5 psi on every cylinder. Both wet and dry tests. I know for a fact I am getting ample fuel to the carb and the carb appears to be working fine. I just replaced the distributor because of a backfire and I wanted to set timing and the stock one was completely frozen in there so I replaced it. I have the timing set to a rough estimate to where it will start and idle. After 1-3 minutes the car will just shut off. It will start up again and die out soon after. What could be causing this? I am leaning towards a failing ignition control module or coil being that I just put on a electronic fuel pump that puts out the same PSI as the mechanical one so I know fuel is good with a good psi. What should I head towards? 400 6.6 L

Jace

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Hi Jace -

Thirty years is a long time for any vehicle to sit unused with critical parts slowly deteriorating. What you describe sounds like common tune up items failing or parts that need adjusting. Some items such as the fuel filters etc. may need checking again now that the engine is now running. Were the ignition parts new that you replaced? Did you remove the fuel tank and the fuel sender for cleaning and to check for rust? The inside of the fuel tank and sending unit are subject to much corrosion after thirty years of non-use and old fuel. What is the fuel pressure at the carburetor at the point of the engine shutting off? Did this stalling issue surface before or after you began the restoration? Did you do the necessary final adjustments on the carb after the engine was warmed up? Is the choke plate opening completely as designed when the engine is warmed to operating temperature? Performing a rough estimate on the ignition timing with a problem vehicle that has not been running for a long time is not really good enough.

The above suggestions may only be a beginning list of some items for you to check or recheck. We wish you lots of luck with the restoration. Those 79 Marks are great Lincolns.

Sincerely,

Bill