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June 26, 2020

1979 Town Car Rear Main Seal Leak

Hi Bill -

my mechanic is flummoxed by an oil leak at main seal (rear) in my 79 Town Car with 400 engine. He has replaced the seal three times to no avail (used two different brands). He also questions the notches on the crankshaft, wondering if these contribute to the problem. He thinks maybe a rope seal was original. Any words of wisdom for us?

Larry

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Hi Larry -

Some of these oil leaks can be frustrating at times. I am surprised though that your mechanic has you the customer searching for the answer to his problem with your oil leak. Usually experienced engine repair mechanics have local engine machine shops that they deal with and to consult with. Check first to be certain that the leak is actually caused by the rear main engine seal and not the oil pressure sending unit located at the top rear of the engine. An oil sending unit leak can appear under the engine as a rear main seal leak. Next examine the crank at the critical seal area for excess wear etc. that could cause a poor seal and leak.

Do you know if the rear main bearing etc. was gaged for proper clearance and then replaced with a new bearing set of the correct thickness and fit for the crankshaft. Bearings at this location with too much clearance are known to allow too much oil pressure to leak towards the rear main seal area and cause leaks. All of the above are only suggestions from our experiences. It may be a wise move on your part to have an experienced engine machine shop mechanic look at this situation while it is apart. Problems such as this usually require an on-scene inspection.

If the above suggestions are applied and the replacement parts are correct and installed correctly the engine should not leak from the rear main seal. We wish you and your mechanic the best of luck in correcting this issue. Please let us know what you find.

Sincerely,

Bill

June 23, 2020

1964 Sedan Electrical Issues

Hi Bill -

Connected the battery and heard a click/pop from the passenger side firewall area. Car runs fine but now I have no exterior lights. Head/rear or brake. No interior lights either. Alternator still working bit car turns off without battery. Got behind the splash guard on the front passenger wheel well. I have to replace the window relay anyway. There are 3 other relays do any of these control the issues I mentioned? Are the available at your shop? If this isn't the issue what about the circuit breakers behind the glove box?

Thanks!

Mark

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Hello Mark -

The 64's and 65's can certainly become a challenge electrically sometimes. You don't advise us of any meaningful testing that you have done so far to identify your current issue. I can point out however some problems that we have encountered at Lincoln Land on the 64's. You should use a 12 volt test light and test the fuse box and the circuit breakers for power in and out of them. We have seen problems behind the right kick pad with the electrical that pass through to the starter relay junction. These heavy wire contact plugs and connectors can become deteriorated/melted inside and then fail suddenly. All of the wiring, any breakers and pass through etc. in the right, kick pad area should be carefully inspected visually and tested. We have also seen many Ammeter gauge connectors fail and cause the ammeters to not allow power to pass through. These faulty ammeters usually surface as strange ammeter readings when they begin to become troublesome. Good luck to you with your testing and diagnosis.

Sincerely,

Bill

June 22, 2020

1968 Sedan AC Blower Motor Question

Bill -

I have a question for you experts.

Should the AC blower ever run when the ignition is turned off?

Currently, when the window safety switch is in the bypass position the blower does not turn off unless you turn the AC to off. When the switch is in the locked position the blower turns off with the ignition.

I have replaced the relay but it did not resolve this issue.

Thank you,

Greg

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Hi Greg -

The switch that you are referring to has two functions. When the lockout side is selected the RF, RR, and the LR windows become inoperative from their individual switches. The switch will lock in this lockout position until returned back to the center or neutral position. When the By-pass side of the switch is selected all of the windows will operate with the ignition switch in the off position. The blower will operate as well if the a/c or heat control is in the on position. The important feature for you to know is that this by-pass switch will automatically return to the off or neutral position when it is released. It will NOT lock in the on position. The by-pass feature allows you to momentarily operate and lower the windows before entering the vehicle on a hot day etc.

If your by-pass switch is in fact locking in the on position, the switch is possibly installed incorrectly or somehow the wiring near the switch has been installed wrong during some sort of repair. Some faults did arrive at the Dealer from the factory however and therefore it is possible that this Lincoln was delivered to the original purchaser and never repaired. The power window operation is explained in the owner's manual as well as the shop manual.

Sincerely,

Bill

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Thank you Bill.

My switch locks in the bypass position. So if I am correctly interpreting the info below, it sounds like my switch is either defective or installed backwards if that is possible?

Thank you,

Greg

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Greg -

I can't tell from here of course exactly what has been miss installed. Reading and understanding your very clear blog question and information did cause me however to believe that your switch was inappropriately locking. If this has been happening for a long time, the switch or the plug wiring could have been faulty since 1968. If it only began to do this recently someone could have created the issue during a repair of sorts. In any case I myself have never encountered this or repaired this exact issue before. If you need our services to correct this fault or supply any parts, we are certainly capable.

Sincerely,

Bill

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Thank you Bill.

I will be taking out the switch and send it to you for diagnosis. I also have a left rear switch that needs rebuilt. I will also check the wiring to see if is correctly install according to the schematics.

Best regards,

Greg

June 12, 2020

1960 Mark Convertible Overheating Issue from November 2019 - and follow up

Bill -

I have just purchased this wonderful car but unfortunately it overheats very badly after about 20 minutes running. I have removed the main thermostat but that did not help. When I start the engine with the radiator cap removed water erupts from the filler neck. I have been told this maybe a cylinder head gasket problem but there is no sign of water in the oil or oil in the water. Would the 2 block thermostats or missing water diverters cause this type of effect on starting please. I am trying to avoid removing the engine as it's very heavy!!

Thank you and best regards.

David

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Greetings David -

Yes, those 58/60 Lincolns are very special cars. They create excitement with car lovers wherever they are shown.

We cannot seem to locate your customer number here at Lincoln Land or the information and sheets on the sale of the car (if you purchased it from us). Would you please send us that information along with any helpful maintenance history etc.

Did the coolant erupt from the filler neck area before you removed the thermostat? Removing the thermostat is never the way to correct an overheating engine of course. A sixty year old car can have several cooling system issues depending on the quality of the maintenance performed by its owners since the car was new. Yes, we do recommend eliminating the block thermostats and servicing the diverters. However, the easy to check items should be examined first. What was the actual indication to you that your engine was overheating? Was it the Temperature gauge reading only or loss of coolant etc.? The previous owner should be able to supply some important information to you regarding this cooling system issue.

Sincerely,

Bill

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Dear Bill,

Many thanks for your swift reply and my very tardy response!!

The car came from the US to the UK in around 1988 and stayed there for 10 years or so. It then was exported to Spain and eventually to Tenerife in 2002. I purchased it from the Spanish owner a few months ago and he owned it since 2002. Unfortunately it was a distressed sale on the owners behalf and he refuses to discuss the overheating issue now as he did not tell me about it when we were negotiating. The car will remain in Tenerife so there will be no future rust issues!!

I am unsure if the filler neck fountain was present before I removed the thermostat but the first indication before this was coolant overflowing from the overflow pipe in the radiator onto the road. The gauge eventually moves to the far right and you can hear 'bubbling' in the radiator and also in the head I think after 15 to 20 minutes.
I am thinking it may be a head gasket issue and intend to make a spark plug with a drilled hole and try a little air pressure to each cylinder in turn to see if there is any bubbling in the radiator.

The parts book also shows a fan shroud on the 5 bladed, air conditioned cars and my car definitely does not have one fitted, I am sure this doesn't help the situation but is not the total answer I am sure.

I do need some parts so will contact your sales department for those.
If you have any other thoughts or suggestions they would be very welcome.

Best regards,

David

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Hello David -

After you do the air pressure test in the cylinders and are satisfied that all is well at that point I would look at the radiator. If it is original and/or up to specs for an a/c car I would have a radiator shop examine it and to rod it out to clean it properly. After all of these years and depending on the vehicle maintenance, regular flushing will not dislodge the sludge that has built up over time. The rad cap should be tested of course to be sure that it is within specs. Water pumps on these engines are also known to suffer from damaged impellers. Next, the block thermostats should be discarded and the diverters serviced as you have no information on their condition. The fan shroud is an important feature to have " if " one was factory installed on yours. If some type of work was performed on your Lincoln at some point in time and the "wrong" radiator installed they may have left the shroud off because it did not fit. We have no knowledge of a fan shroud factory installed however on this era of Lincoln in the USA. Keep us posted on your progress with the overheating situation.

Sincerely,

Bill

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June 2020

Bill,

Good day again after a few months. I have made the pressure test plug and have tested each cylinder in turn but cannot find a problem. I have now removed the radiator and had that checked at our local specialist. They actually changed the core a few years ago and it seems to be completely clear, however I do not think it is not the correct radiator as it does not have the auto trans fluid entering and leaving at the base. There is a separate cooler for that mounted in front of the AC radiator which I am sure is not standard. I have now removed the water pump, the block thermostats are missing, the LH diverter is there but badly rusted and the RH one has rusted away completely. I am undecided what to do next, do you think I should remove some freeze plugs at the back of the block and see if there is a build up of rust and scale? I was also tempted to renew the head gaskets as I am so far into the dismantling stage, but as I said before there i s no sign of oil in the water or water in the oil. Hope you are all staying safe and well in the US, it has been an awful time for so many people, all the best.

David

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David -

Because of the position that your Lincoln's previous owner has taken with no information available regarding the overheating engine, I can only advise you by using your own limited information. We would need to do the proper diagnose with the vehicle here at our shop in order for us to examine and be accurate.

Did anyone examine the fan blade, fan clutch , water pump and impeller etc. for any issues? If the radiator is NOT the original as you seem to believe, it may be very undersized or badly plugged inside. If this radiator is in fact not adequate and is undersized for this Lincoln it will need to be replaced with the correct one. If it is original it will need to be removed and taken apart for inspection and each passageway rodded out clean by a competent rad shop or replaced with another correct one. The diverters should then be serviced, the freeze plugs removed and the block inspected for any sludge inside. The block should then be thoroughly flushed and the plugs replaced with new ones. Be sure to install the correct rated thermostat and a coolant mixture as per the manual. Be advised that a coolant mixture of anti- freeze is necessary even in a hot climate because it will raise the boiling point and will help to protect the system from corrosion. We usually have the faster needed repair parts for this era of Lincolns in stock. Good luck on the repair.

Sincerely,

Bill

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Hello Bill,

Thank you very much for your reply.

I will work on all your points and I really do wish I could bring the car to you to sort out but the journey would be a very tricky one!!

I have been looking at the location of the freeze plugs and they appear difficult to remove and replace with the engine in situ?

Is this something that can be done if I decided to remove manifolds and starter motor?

Best,

David

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David -

If you have decided that the block is very possibly plugged with debris as previously discussed why not remove one or two "easy to service" freeze plugs first in order to inspect those areas and be certain. If in fact they all must be removed, you will need to do what you need to do in order to remove them. If the starter is blocking one, of course it will need to be removed. On some engines the complete freeze plug job is made easier by disconnecting the engine mounts and carefully raising the engine slightly. This job and other jobs may require certain skills and tools that you are not familiar with.

You will need to inspect the possibilities from underneath the car and decide if this really is a job for you or not. Please keep in mind that your safety is of the utmost consideration.

Sincerely,

Bill

June 11, 2020

1971 Mark III Road Noise

Hi Bill,

Enjoying my 1971 Mark III out here in the Philadelphia area - gets lots of miles. Trying to solve a road noise issue coming from passenger side door. In the rain recently I could hear the splash of water while coming to a stop, road noise from door in dry weather. Ordering new weatherstripping today for around the door but its not in bad shape now. Door fits and operates perfectly - window, etc all perfect. Good alignment of door around fender and 1/4, etc. Could gap at bottom of door be too much for seal to handle ? could adjusting the hinges help this ? My guess is all noise is from bottom edge of door. Thanks !

Sincerely,

John

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Hi John -

Yes, there is a possibility that the passenger door ( right door ) has a poor seal at the bottom edge. This can be verified with a sheet of dry paper inserted at the suspected weather-strip seal area and closing the door on it from the outside and then moving the paper back and forth laterally to feel if the paper is being prevented from easily moving. You should inspect under that door first for any visible faults or missing weather-strip . You can compare this door seal quality and then the driver's door in order to feel the difference between the two of them. Any gap found in the seal at the bottom of the door can cause the issue that you are describing. Good luck to you with this test.

Sincerely,

Bill

June 5, 2020

1979 New Owner Issues

Hi Bill,

I have recently come into a 1979 Continental Collectors Edition. When I first got it, it didn’t run but after replacing the fuel pump and carb it ran great. About a week ago I started it and when I took the keys out it never shut off. I replaced the ignition switch and now the accessory relay will click once when trying to start it and nothing will happen. I've replaced the starter solenoid and tried the old ignition switch but the same thing happens. Everything else seems to work fine.

Sincerely,

Hayden

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Hello Hayden -

One of your problems is that you probably do not have a shop manual and wiring diagram. That leaves you to guess and hope.

Did you do the necessary adjustment to any of the ignition switches that you installed? Did you install new parts or?

We at Lincoln Land would prefer to diagnose the ignition electrical portion as a first step with the use of the proper shop manual and wiring diagram along with the appropriate test equipment. Good luck with the repair.

Sincerely,

Bill

June 3, 2020

1969 Continental Cruise Control Questions

Hi Bill -

My 69 comes with speed control which has now been fixed. Just to be clear on how to use it properly. I press the 'on' switch on the lower part of the dash and when I reach the desired speed press and hold for 1 to 2 seconds the black button on the turn signal arm, is this correct? Also when I brake the cruise comes off and when I accelerate the cruise seems to re engage at the speed I originally set it at is this correct? Any help would be appreciated.

Thanks,

Bill

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Paul -

Once the brake pedal is pressed the factory installed speed control will disengage the set speed and will NOT return to the previously set speed. It is necessary to reactivate the t/s lever control again to return to the speed of your choice once again. This operation is explained completely in your owners manual or the FoMoCo service manual.

What exactly was done to repair your speed control recently to get it to start operating at all ?

Sincerely,

Bill