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1961 Blower Motor Issues

Hi Bill,

First off thanks your advice to all the folks on here and for providing a place to find hard to get parts (I have ordered a few things from yall in the past). I am having a little trouble with a '61 sedan. The blower for a/c only activates when turned to heat, as soon as the position knob is turned to vent or a/c the blower immediately quits. I have checked the vacuum hoses on the back of the knob and all appear to be connected correctly and I can hear an audible click from the compressor engaging so it appears the switch is working correctly. Not sure where to go from here.

Brandon

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Hi Brandon -

That problem with the blower is not uncommon. Your 61 has three blowers. Two blowers are used for heat, One is located behind the left wheel kickup splash panel and the other is located behind the right wheel kickup panel. The third should be located under the hood on the engine side of the firewall inside a casing near the center for the a/c. I would first check the electrical at this blower ( if access is easy ) for power there with the car running and the a/c on. This design is unusual and somewhat complicated. If power is there at that blower then the blower ground could be loose or disconnected. If you have power in to that motor and the ground is good, that motor could be faulty. If there is power to that motor, the Vacuum Transfer Switch that is located behind the panel at the rear of the LF wheel could be faulty or not activated. This switch receives vacuum from the dash a/c control switch in a/c mode. It then uses this vacuum to operate the transfer switch to electrically disconnect the two heater motors and turn on the a/c motor. The problem there can be no vacuum or low vacuum from the main control switch due to leaks or a bad electric connection at that transfer switch or an bad internal connection inside that switch. In the end it may be much easier for you to send this switch to us for testing. We may be able to rebuild this switch for you or replace with a good used one if it proves faulty.

The wiring diagrams and operation with drawings should be shown in your shop manual. I do hope that you have the correct manual. They are very necessary and can save time and money.

Sincerely,

Bill