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February 25, 2019

1969 Mark AC Questions & Follow Up

Hi Bill -

Aircon blows cold initially and then warms up. No leaks, compressor is good, suction port gets cold. Seems a door is partially closing too. TX valve is new. Heater tap is wired shut. In the evaporator is a capillary switch. If I remove this from the evap to outside it, or bypass it, will the system think its really hot and just do fully cold? I don't care about climate control, on a 40C day all I want is max cold. Thanks.

Gary

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Hi Gary -

Plus 40 c is real hot. If you are not interested in repairing the climate control properly, do not have a manual, have a GOOD WORKING refrigeration system and want cooling only, you can simply bypass the heater core hoses under the hood at the firewall. The Water Valve may not be shutting off internally. You may also want to wire up the damper doors under the dash to direct the air out of the a/c outlets.

I have never done this but we have seen some vehicles that have the a/c working this way for relief from the heat. Repairing the Automatic Climate Control can be difficult even with the shop manual. The above should work for you and provide the cool air as you are indicating.

Sincerely,

Bill

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Hello Bill -

I was in southern England one July day in 2017, it was 29C and people didn't know what to do with themselves. Drink fridges in shops weren't keeping up because they had not been designed for that temperature. If the US auto industry was based in Arizona I am sure their ACs would work properly. As it is they work alright for warm day in Detroit, totally inadequate. We do get days over 40C every summer. I have a friend in Townsville with a Mk IV and same issues. On my Lincoln I have wired shut the heater tap, so rule that out. It is not the obvious reasons. The AC works initially, then for some Detroit-thinking reason, it decides that it's too cold, close some door. I haven't found where it physically is in the car yet.

I also have a 64 Cadillac, not on the road yet, it has factory climate control, I am expecting the same from that. This capillary probe in the evaporator, what does that do?

Regards,

Gary

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Hi Gary -

That capillary tube and switch is known as the De-icing switch. It has two functions. It will cycle the compressor as needed in order to prevent ice build up in the evaporator coils. These cycling periods depend on the temperature of the ambient air intake through the evaporator and the blower fan speed. If the blower speed is low, the passage of air in the evaporator is slower causing a lower temperature at the capillary tube. The other function of this switch is to hold the compressor clutch power off during the winter temperatures.

I cannot rule out the wired shut water valve ( heater tap )as a problem that you already have installed to prevent coolant flow through the heater core. These valves are well known because of age etc. to not seal well or not at all because of failure at the valve and sealing area in side. Bypassing the heater core however will ensure a positive shut off. You stated in your first blog letter that you do not care about the Climate Control and that you only wanted ice cold air. The suggestions that I wrote for you are to help satisfy these desires. Best of luck to you with your project.

Sincerely,

Bill

February 21, 2019

1979 Mark V - Smoking, With A Hint Of Gas....

Hi Bill,

So here's my problem I've been having with my Mark V.

So she has been sitting for a while and I started the car here and there, but now I wanna drive my car as a daily. But I noticed every time I start it, a white/blueish cloud of smoke comes out the exhaust with a very very strong smell of fuel. My clothes smell like it if I am even outside my car when it's on. I believe it's the carburetor running too rich on fuel, but I'm not sure. The oil dipstick smells like gas too! It worries me a bunch.

I only have 76K miles on her. After a cold start and it warms up. The car will start back up again without any hesitation and no smoke, but still have a very strong smell of gas.

Ivan

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Ivan -

Any vehicle that sits dormant for a long period of time can have several failures when it is finally awakened and put back in service. You do not advise us what you mean by " she has been sitting for a while ". Could that mean sixteen months or maybe sixteen years? What have you or your mechanic done so far to correct the fuel smell etc.? If you are smelling raw fuel and cannot locate a raw fuel leak at the fuel tank, lines to the fuel pump and around the carburetor I would suspect that the carburetor has failed and is allowing raw gas to overflow into the engine. Black exhaust could be a sign of a choke that is not opening as required and/or that the inlet floats are not operating as designed. Diagnosis may be needed by a competent mechanic on scene with your Mark V.

Sincerely,

Bill

February 5, 2019

1978 Mark Shorted Interior Lights

Hi Bill,

I unbolted my driver side interior light under the dash to inspect the housing. I must have touched the hot wire to the metal ground of the dash while doing so because all of the lights went out and I heard the seat back lock actuator click.

The fuse isn't blown and everything else is working. I'm not sure what to check next.

Thank you in advance, I appreciate the help!

Josh

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Josh -

I would first test all of the fuses using a test light designed for these situations with the key in the ( on ) position.

Sincerely,

Bill

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Thanks Bill,

I've checked all the fuses with the key on and a test light and the only fuses that I don't have power to are labeled

Warn lps
Deice
Pwr wind (which they still work)
And the bottom of the power seat fuse (which they still work too)

I also checked to see if the bulbs had power. None of them do, and none of them are blown either.

Josh

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Josh -

Our previous response was of course based on the information that you supplied. The problem occurred while you were working very near at that connection under the dash in front of your eyes. I cannot see what from here what was disconnected or shorted out at that location etc. Some other wiring could have been moved and disconnected. Why not reassemble your circuit and recheck. Possibly you have unknowingly disconnected a ground in the area. Do you have a wiring diagram to work with.

Sincerely,

Bill

February 1, 2019

1979 Mark V AC Questions & Updates....

Hi Bill,

Alasdair in Australia here. I have a 1979 Mark V and I am preparing to do an upgrade of the air conditioner. We use R134a refrigerant.

I have looked at your parts listing and am preparing to order a suction throttling valve (calibrated for R134a), an expansion valve and a drier from you.
I have already got a new compressor here in Australia compatible with R134a as the same type were used on local GM cars "back in the day".

I have studied the picture of the suction throttling valve on you parts listing and I have even found a copy of the instruction page on the Internet that goes with it. I see that the replacement suction throttling valve that you sell has a port for an external equalised expansion valve equaliser line along with a port for the liquid bleed line. My car has an internal equalised bypass orifice expansion valve without the equaliser line. See page 36-32-3 & 4 of Workshop Manual Volume 3, Figures 1,2 & 3. My car system is as is presented in figure 3.

My question: If I fit a new R134a suction throttling valve (that I intend to buy from you guys), do I have to fit a new external equalised expansion valve or do I stick with a new (same as existing) internal equalised bypass orifice expansion valve and blank off the port on the new suction throttling valve ? I am curious about this as I want to make sure I order the correct parts.

I have all manuals, diagrams (electrical and vacuum) and books on auto air conditioning.
I am going to try and get the rubber hoses redone to be compatible with R134a.
Do you have any other suggestions on an air conditioner rebuild ? The air conditioner has been in constant use for quite sometime and has not been sitting idle. It blows cold only at low engine revs. Speed up and it warms up. All switching functions of the ATC work fine (electrical and vacuum).

Thanks for any help you can give.

Regards,

Alasdair

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Hi Alasdair -

For now this response is to your last paragraph. Excellent that you have all of the necessary manuals. Your last two sentences strongly indicate to me that your a/c performance suffers from a low charge of refrigerant. This has happened to myself years ago and was very interesting. This system and others can operate as normal with loss of refrigerant to a point and then with only a loss of a few ounces more the cooling collapses. At idle however cooling appears to be fine until the engine is accelerated or the car driven and the condenser is cooled to a point where the cooling collapses because of slight further shrinkage of the remaining refrigerant. This can be tested at idle with the system operating and a thermometer in the outlet vent. While it is cooling the interior at this time spray cool water on the condenser and watch the air outlet vent temperature for a rise. If you have a/c gauges attached, the a/c pressures should also change somewhat. If this is so, a loss of refrigerant may have occurred over time and adding 1/2 to 1lb of refrigerant should restore the cooling to operate again at higher rpms.

The above is only to be sure that you have all of the possibilities to assist in your decision. If you still wish to change your system as you describe, please let us know and we will send you a list of what we have used in the past to complete a change over.

Sincerely,

Bill

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Hi Bill,

Thank you for the advice. I will do what you suggested and let you know the outcome.

Regards,

Alasdair

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Hi Bill,

Thanks for your advice and for taking an interest.

I just ran my car and did as you suggested with a thermometer in one of the centre cabin vents.

I had the system running on A/C thus recirculating the cabin air.
At idle the cabin vent was sitting at 50 degrees F. It is summer here and is very hot.
There was ice on the suction throttling valve(STV), the pipe on the compressor side of the STV and on the steel pipe that goes into the compressor.

I ran some water over the condenser and the vent temp increased to around 56 to 58 degrees F. The ice on the pipes remained.

I increased the revs for several minutes and no real change in vent temp or ice covering on the pipes occurred.

I then changed the A/C setting to HiLo (outside air) and the ice disappeared almost immediately. I assume this is because the cooling load across the evaporator changed with the introduction of warm air across the evaporator. The cabin vent temp increased immediately as well to over 60 degrees. Again, it is summer here and is over 100 degrees F most days. It was about 95 when I did these tests. My car is a weekend cruiser and is not used everyday. Too nice for daily work in the heat.
When you suggested a refrigerant leak along with your diagnosis methods, I also had a good look around for system leaks. I found some minor oil moisture around where the compressor line joins the condenser (very minor) and a minor oil leak at one of the drier connections to the condenser. If oil can leak, I assume so too can refrigerant.
What do you think ?

I will send you an email later regarding my interest in changing the STV to a new valve calibrated to R134a.

Regards,

Alasdair

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Hi Alasdair -

Your figures indicate to me a low refrigerant charge as discussed. The actual refrigerant pressures would tell us more. You could if possible where you are located and have access to tools and refrigerant, safely remove the present 134a, save it and add it and enough by weight of fresh 134a for a full charge. The charge should be 80% of an r12 charge ( Possibly ) 3-3 1/2 lbs. of 134a. Then do your tests again and watch for an improvement. If you have a positive improvement, you now need to find the leak and correct this issue as per most refrigeration laws. Proper knowledge and equipment for testing would be necessary. Anywhere refrigerant is routed are suspect. The evaporators on these models are very popular leak areas as well. We drill a special hole in the plastic evaporator casing ( but not very near the evaporator itself ) to gain access with our test equipment if a leak is suspected in that area. Extreme caution is required to avoid puncturing the evaporator. A body plug will seal the drilled hole when finished. The radiator cooling fan must be the correct one for the vehicle and its clutch ( if it has a clutch fan ) must be operative.

Sincerely,

Bill

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Thanks Bill,

I know a very experienced auto electrician who has state of the art equipment for refrigerant handling at his business. I will do as you suggest and get back to you. May be a couple of weeks by the time I can book it in.

Whereabouts do you drill the hole in the plastic evaporator casing ? Can I remove the blower resistors and use that hole to probe for leaks ?

Radiator fan is correct.

Thanks again.

Regards,

Alasdair

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Alasdair -

Yes..,, you can use the blower speed resistor duct insert for an access. If there is one located in the duct under the hood between the blower and the evaporator that is a good safe place to access. I do not have a manual to verify access locations of components here where I am today. A leak detector tube can be inserted and the evaporator can be carefully tested electronically. A leaking evaporator will usually display visual oil leaks but may be difficult to see in some locations. Good luck with the testing. Did adding refrigerant (as a test only) improve the cooling?

Sincerely,

Bill

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Hi Bill,

Thanks for your answers and information.

It will be a few days before I can get to book my car in at the auto electricians workshop and do the refrigerant top up along with the leak test. I will let you know the outcome as soon as I get it done.

Regards,

Alasdair

Denise Armentrout - 1952-2019

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We are saddened to share the news that Lincoln Land has lost one of our own... For the past 35 years Denise Armentrout has been a valued employee, and devoted friend to us as well as our clientele around the world. She will be missed.

Denise Armentrout, passed away on Wednesday, January 23rd, 2019, at her home. The family invites everyone out to celebrate her life on February 2nd, 1:30pm at Cornerstone Christian Church, 317 Milwaukee Ave, Dunedin, FL 34698. She is survived by her son, Shawn Armentrout and daughter, Amber Krekovic and husband Ivan and grandson Toby, her sisters, Linda Dodge, Diane Cracolici and Dawn Ford as well as her 3 brothers, John, Thomas and Robert Cracolici. She is also survived by her uncle Salvatore Cracolici whom was like a father to her.

Flowers are welcome, as well as donations to her church, Cornerstone Christian.

1969 Mark AC Issues

Hi,

I have had Lincoln Land service my Mark before, and I even donated a '70 parts Mark to Chris.

While driving at about 60 MPH on 75 , I heard a snap and simultaneously noticed a drop & then rise in the alternator gauge.

I turned the ATC off, and stopped & checked for a bad belt, but all was in order.
After I got home from a 70 mile outing, I cut the engine off and placed the ignition in the run position and also in the accessory position.

In both cases, when I placed the ATC on, the noisy blower seemed to try to start, but the alternator gauge immediately dropped to the far low end.

What went wrong, and is it easy enough to service myself ?

Denise was always my chief contact there and I miss her helping me, so I am going to have to go about it the slow way.

Are you able to help me figure this out ?

It's a long trip to Clearwater from Fort Myers.

Thank you in advance,

Charlie

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Greetings Charlie -

We here at Lincoln Land were deeply saddened by the loss of our Denise. She had a special personality that made her customers feel at home. She will always be remembered here at Lincoln Land.

The "snap noise" that you describe is unusual and I cannot imagine from your explanation what it was, but the fact that you have a severe electrical draw along with a noise in the blower motor area indicates a problem in the blower motor itself. If this excess draw continues from the blower motor ( even if it operates ) wiring damage soon can occur. The blower motor electrical draw can be tested to verify this but the blower motor noise that you report leads me to believe that it is your problem in this case. Another possible draw could also be the compressor clutch. If you unplug the compressor coil at the compressor and operate the system with the compressor unplugged you can verify this. I do suspect that If the blower noise is internal, the blower motor itself will need to be replaced. The blower motor is removed through the right kickpad recirc air door cavity under the dash. This job can be a challenge to any one that is not familiar. Corrosion in the area is also a possibility. Be prepared with a new or good used blower motor available before removing the old one.

A service manual is a great asset for some of these tests and procedures. If you need more information, we can send you a copy of this section from our shop manual.

Sincerely,

Bill