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September 25, 2017

1966 Continental Sedan Brake Light Issues

Bill -

I'm having brake light problem with my Lincoln. Turn signals running lights and emergency flashers work but no brake lights. I have power coming and going from the brake switch to turn signal switch but no power to anything in the trunk. In the schematic it shows a "stop lamp relay" but I cannot seem to locate it or find anything online. Also shop manual says there is a stop light breaker "r.h. Cowl side panel" page 15-8 I also can't find location of that. Any help is greatly appreciated.

Rob

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Hi Rob -

The brake light relay on a 66 is located under the hood on the left side ( drivers side ) inner fender mounted on a rubber pad, near the cover with the other relays. The breaker panel should be located under the dash forward of the glove box. The wire colors at the relay should be:

Red with white tracer

Green with white tracer

Green

You will of course need to trace the power path from the brake switch to the relay and turn signal switch and to the rear lights. Keep in mind that the vehicles with the tilt steering wheel option use a very different turn signal switch than those with a fixed wheel.

Sincerely,

Bill

September 15, 2017

1970 Mark - New Owner Questions

Hello Bill,

I just found your blog and I am very interested in it. I hope I do not make any faux pas in this first email. My late mother-in-law left a family heirloom to us after she passed. It is her originally owned 1970 Mark III that has been in storage for some time. I am trying to put it back on the road for occasional Sunday drives and have already completed a number of deferred maintenance issues. There are five items that I have not been able to resolve:

1) The hydraulic windshield wipers will not turn off.

2) The engine instruments will work sometimes and other times not. The ignition switch is very sloppy and the outside basil (?) can be pulled off exposing the key slot. It will fit back on and start the engine with no problems.

3) The drivers side window will not work. The motor sounds when the electric button is pushed but does not move. The window can be pulled up and pushed down by hand.
The small rear window on both sides do not work at all when the master control at the drivers station is pushed or when the individual stations are pushed.

4) I just had the A/C system switched over to the current type of coolant and had a new compressor installed and it worked fine the next few time that we drove the car. Yesterday, when activated, the compressor loads the engine but only hot air comes out of the vents, regardless of where the "TEMP" switch on the "AUTOMATIC TEMPERATURE CONTROL" is set. Sometimes the fan will come on when the top lever is moved to LOW and to HIGH but after turning the engine off and then on the fan will not come on unless I move the top lever to DE-FOG or DE-ICE.

5) Do you have any suggestions or guidance on where I may find information on these systems? I realize, now, that it would have been better if I would have sent individual emails for each item. If you like I will break them down in individual emails.

Thank you in advance for any help that you may be able to give to me.

Bill

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Greetings Bill -

Congratulations on your 1970 Mark III purchase. They are great cars and are much admired by car collectors. With the issues that you are describing you have plenty of work and learning ahead. A wiring diagram as well as your Shop Manuals will be needed. Electrical skills etc. and some test equipment are also very necessary. Since you are reporting the problem items with no diagnosis information I can only advise you what usually fails on these items. You or your mechanic will need to do the diagnosis.

The wiper problem could be a maladjusted control cable, the vacuum hose to the wiper motor from the switch is not bleeding off after the windshield washer is activated ( both can be observed at the hydraulic motor by moving the access panel forward at the hydraulic hoses at the engine side of the firewall ) or the motor is internally defective.

The temp., oil and fuel gauges are powered by a single Instrument panel Voltage Regulator (IVR) located behind the clear plastic lens beside the gauges. The shop manual explains the operation and diagnosis very well.
Your description of the non operative drivers door window sounds like the popular window motor gear failure. We always have parts in stock for this problem. The quarter windows issue description indicates that they have been dormant for a long time and are stuck in position from lack of activity. Many times they can be reactivated with the use of a commercial high amp battery charger temporarily on the battery and the switch cycled to the UP and Down position until they start to operate. If this fails and the motor is receiving power, the mechanism inside the quarter panel will need to be partially loosened or disassembled until it moves. Of course there are other possibilities but this is the most common. When the windows are finally repaired, always lower them very very slightly when the car is stored to unload the motors and gears.

The ignition switch part that is sloppy and not attached will need to be disassembled as per the shop manual and observed for broken parts. We should have parts available at Lincoln Land.

Your Automatic Climate Control consists of the refrigeration system and its controls. Lack of cooling indicates the possibility of a leaking refrigerant issue but your report of the many other conditions tells me that there are several other problems that exist. These systems can be extremely complicated for those that have no experience however the shop manual is excellent in all respects with operation explanations and diagnosis procedures. We have parts available as well as professional testing and rebuilding of the ATC box and Servo.

At L.L. we see vehicles that have had many of cobbled up electrical and mechanical parts that can be a nightmare for a new owner. We wish you the best of luck in your diagnosis and timely repairs. We also look forward to supplying you with the needed parts.

Sincerely,

Bill

August 30, 2017

1975 Mark IV Wire Repair

Bill -

Good afternoon, I was checking the electric choke wire for the carb (someone had cut it off) so I pulled the tape off all the wires in that area. I found that the ground wire from the alternator to splice S-202 (according to my wiring diagrams), which splits the alt wire into four, had been broken very close to the splice. Naturally, someone had to skip doing it right and just twisted a new piece in as well as they could, which wasn't much. Needless to say, there isn't much left to connect to. My question is, where may I find a S-202 (shaped like a cylinder) or is there some other proper fix? Couldn't find anything specific on Google. Thank you.

Jim

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Jim -

Repairs such as you describe are usually simply improvised on scene by an automotive electrical technician with the proper use of a solder gun, solder, heat shrink if needed and then followed up with a professional wrap with electrical tape. These materials are available at local electrical suppliers along with any appropriate sleeve connectors etc. that are needed. FoMoCo never offered any repair instructions for any specific splices unless that splice or any other connectors became a common problem and required redesigning.

Sincerely,

Bill

August 22, 2017

1971 Mark III Brake Issues

Bill,

My Mark III had brake service performed by the previous owners at 90,000 miles, including rear wheel cylinders, shoes and hardware, front calipers, pads and hoses replaced. The system performed well and after I took delivery had it inspected for safety and everything checked out OK. At about 91K miles, it began demonstrating the tell-tale symptoms of a bad master cylinder: a slowly sinking pedal at stop signs and red lights. There was a little leakage behind the master cylinder onto the booster, and the old master cylinder looked a little too pitted inside to rebuild, so I replaced both. The booster holds vacuum and the push-rod is properly adjusted to a new master cylinder. However after bench bleeding the master cylinder and then using the two-man system to bleed the rest of the system on the car, I get a very soft pedal. It easily goes almost to the floor before the brakes "grab". This is when the engine is running with vacuum to the booster. The pedal is very hard when the engine if off. I've tried three master cylinders so far, at first assuming a bad master out of the box. I've tried bench bleeding using the bleeder tube system and the plugged outlet ports system until there's no more air or I'm not able to depress the piston further. Even though nothing else has changed on the brake system, I've checked all four wheels, the shoes are still adjusted to the drums and I find no loss of fluid anyplace. I haven't touched the Sure Track system or pressure differential valve except to temporarily disconnect the brake lines between it and the master cylinder to make room for the booster work. The common behavior I notice each time is that when I fill the reservoirs on the bench, fluid eventually drips only from the primary outlet port, never from the secondary port. I've read that each port should drip by gravity alone, and that some even bleed a car by gravity. Could this be a problem with multiple master cylinders, or is gravity bleeding from both ports not necessary here? Am I missing an adjustment someplace else? Is there a particular challenge getting all the air out of the system on this particular car? I want to be thorough and consider everything before I break down and tow it in.

Bradley

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Hi Bradley -

If all of the brake work, fluid bleeding and adjustments were performed properly as you describe, your sinking pedal does sound strongly like a classic by-passing master cylinder. Since we are not the supplier or the installers of your rebuilt master cylinders, I cannot comment on their quality.

However, since you are a local customer of Lincoln Land it may be a good idea for you to make an appointment with our service dept. for a professional on scene diagnosis. Doing this could save you further disappointment in the future.

Sincerely,

Bill

August 21, 2017

1978 Mark V Diamond Jubilee Dash Lights

Hey Bill -

I recently bought a 1978 Lincoln Mark V Diamond Jubilee Edition and there seems to be an issue with the lights. All exterior lights work and most of the interior except the instrument cluster. Not sure if there is a fuse for those lights specifically... I did change a fuse that said "inst. cluster" but it didn't seem to do anything besides stop my clock. All the warning lights work as well as the miles-to-empty gauge. So all the lights work besides the instrument cluster which wont light... Id appreciate any advice you can give me.

Thanks - Rocco

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Hi Rocco -

Nice cars those Marks. The Mark V is becoming quite popular among collectors. I can help you get started on diagnosis by explaining how the Instrument lighting is powered. The power for these lights does go through a small fuse in the fuse panel but this power originates at the instrument light dimmer that is integral with the headlamp switch. Possibilities for your issue are that the dimmer is merely rotated to the Off position or that the switch and rheostat itself is faulty. The above are only suggestions based on your information that must be verified with diagnosis. We can offer to test and repair your switch if necessary if you are unable to.

For DIY diagnosis you will require the Shop Manual, wiring diagram and a 12v test light. We usually have manuals and diagrams available . Trying to repair the electrical without some meaningful diagnosis usually results in frustration along with wasted time and parts.

Sincerely,

Bill

August 16, 2017

79 Stalls Out - Carb Issues

Hi Bill,

Josh here. I have a 79 Lincoln Continental and well, she idles really high. And I'm not sure how to tone it down, I've adjusted the carb idle screw. It wont turn anymore without the engine shutting off. It likes to stall out quite a bit. I'm guessing because of the same issue? When I shut off the key after running into town and she is all warmed up to op temp. She sputters for a few seconds and sometimes even about 15. Shakes the whole car then finally makes a sound like air out of a tire. Before shutting off. I was told that the timing is too advanced, I've been told to get a new carb. And I've been told to adjust the carb more. (Which I cannot) any help would be great. She will be going to a shop this Friday. It's 8/14/17

Sincerely,

Josh

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Greetings Joshua -

From your description, carburetor adjustment or a worn out binding carburetor does indeed seem to be your "too fast of an idle" problem. The adjustments for the various carburetors that were used in 1979 are clearly shown along with all of the other carburetor functions in the Factory Shop manual which you need to perform the adjustments. Unfortunately I cannot observe the state of adjustment, condition of your carburetor or even see if it is the original carb. with all of the original controls installed and functioning correctly. If you for any reason are unable to follow the adjustment procedures in the correct shop manual, someone local in your area with carburetor experience will need to do this for you. If we can be of further help with any parts for this repair please contact us again at any time.

Sincerely,

Bill

July 27, 2017

1979 Mark V Heater Control Valve Question & Follow Up

Hi Bill,

Thought I needed a heater control valve I am in the processes of assessing the problem. I find I have no vacuum at the valve. Going through the manual I see I have a green hose, purple and a black, green going to heater valve, black has vacuum at the plastic manifold but doesn't continue to flow thru green hose to heater valve. When I jump the black hose (Vacuum) to green it operates the valve. Could there be a problem with the plastic manifold that I may not be seeing? There is also a thin cable with a rubber part that moves in that plastic manifold with the cable, don't know if that has an effect. Thanks so much.

Kenneth

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Hi Kenneth -

That green vacuum hose that routes to the water valve will only receive vacuum from the valve on the power servo when the system calls for full cooling and the power servo has pulled that thin wire on the servo valve to the extreme cooling position,. The water valve will receive no vacuum and be open in any other position. This operation is shown on page 36-74-3 of your Factory service manual. If this valve is receiving vacuum but cannot send vacuum to the water valve it could indeed be at fault. the rubber plunger inside of this valve is known to deteriorate and fail with age or if transmission fluid has intruded into the ATC vacuum system because of a vacuum shift valve leak at the transmission. The presence of transmission fluid at the servo valve under the dash will be evident.

If the complete power servo with the valve mounted properly on the side is sent to us we can test and evaluate it for you and possibly repair it for you. The mounting pins on that valve can be brittle and collapse so do not over tighten them.

Sincerely,

Bill

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Thanks Bill,

I may take you up on removing servo if nothing else pops up and forwarding it. I want to check the ATC switch if I can find it on the motor, also is there a test for the ATC temp sensor at glove box.

Thanks again, hope to hear back from you.

Kenny

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Hi Kenny -

Before you tear anything apart you need to be sure how that system operates. As I stated previously, that water valve does not close all the time for a/c, only in the maximum servo a/c position. You did not share the problem that you are experiencing with your ATC that prompted you to check this water valve. Read your manual carefully to know how each component operates. What issue prompted you to suspect a water valve problem ( no cooling, poor cooling etc. )?

Sincerely,

Bill

79 Collector's Series Sedan Interior Lights

Hi Bill,

I purchased a 1979 Lincoln Continental Town Car, Collector's Series about a week ago. Its a great car, but with anything that is almost 40 years old it has a few issues. I am baffled by the rear map lights. They come on when you open the doors/turn on the cabin lights on the dash. However, they will not turn on by the switch on the door panel itself. Now, when the lights are on and you flick the switch, then the lights will blink as the switch toggles on/off. However, once the lights shut off, the switch does nothing again. I don't think its a switch related issue as the lights seem to respond to the switch when they are already illuminated. Any help would be greatly appreciated.

Anthony

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Greetings Anthony -

That lamp circuit is complicated and can be even more complicated to diagnose if you do not have the correct manual and wiring diagram. You can start by testing for power with a 12v test light at the light green/yellow tracer wire at the door switches. If there is no power there you will need to find out why with the use of the wiring diagram. If there is power there, the switch when activated should send power directed to that reading light only. Your owners manual should tell how and when these lights operate.

Sincerely,

Bill

July 18, 2017

1979 Mark V Hard To Start

Hi Bill -

Thank you for getting back to me on the A/C issue with my Mark V. I will share with my mechanic..

I have a new issue... I previously had my mechanic work on the carb to get it to where it starts just like the owners manual advises where if it sits idle for a few days or more, then depress the accelerator pedal two or three times. After I got the car back all was perfect with the cold start where I would do like the owners manual advises and it would start up in like 3-4 seconds in which I would let the choke warm up and then drive away no problem. In the past few months, the cold start process is taking longer each time even if starting the car the very next day. It will just crank and crank and then start after now up to 6-10 seconds. It never did that before and seems like each time the cold start process is taking longer each time I go to start it. Keep in mind that this is happening here in Phoenix, with a brutal heat wave in which some days the air temp is 118 degrees, and the car is stored in a enclosed storage facility. I had the mechanic replace the power valve twice in the carb now and I am wondering if that is the issue again, or is it the brutal heat or vapor lock? I had the gas tank cleaned out, and added fresh gas with a fuel stabilizer that they said I should use since I don't drive the card that often. By the way, when I drive the car, no problem at all with acceleration or deacceleration - it's just this recent cold start issue taking longer, and keep in mind I sometimes go to the storage facility to start it say on a sat morning and the temp outside is about 85-90 degrees. I also had a new fuel filter put on it as well. I appreciate your help with this new issue.

Bill

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Hi Bill -

Agreed, it does sound like a fuel mixture or fuel availability problem. Have your mechanic check the carburetor for cold choke operation and the availability of fuel from the internal carb air inlet under the choke butterfly to the engine from the accelerator pump while pumping but not cranking when the engine has been sitting COLD. Fuel in abundance must be available immediately for an instant cold start.

Sincerely,

Bill

July 10, 2017

1979 Mark V AC Questions

Hi Bill -

I have a 1979 Lincoln Mark V with 10K original miles and have a A/C issue.. When I bought the car I found out from my mechanic that the A/C compressor has a leak and would need to be replaced..It had already been converted to R-134 before so I had the compressor replaced and filled with R-134 again..This was done in early spring and it seemed to work fine but what the climate control system does is when you start the car and turn on the A/C it works fine..When you put it in drive and drive slow it still works fine however when you get on the highway and get it up to speed like over 30MPH approx and above with the A/C temperature selector set as low as it will go the climate control system kicks in and slightly warm air starts coming in from the floor heater ducts and a little from the dash and then the A/C will come back on and start blowing cold again and then back to the heat mode..Keep in mind here in Arizona when I drive it is above 100 Degrees F outside. The A/C should be blowing colder for a longer time and the climate control system is kicking the A/C out sooner than it should..I was wondering if it could be the A/C temperature control sensor that is bad and is not recognizing the true inside cabin temp inside the car..What are your thoughts??

Thanks,

Bill

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Hello Bill -

The system on your Mark does not cycle the compressor so therefor it is engaged all of the time that the Climate Control is on. The compressor will be off in the Vent position, the Heat position and in the winter when the ambient temp. is under approximately 35 degrees F. Loss of vacuum anywhere in the control system will cause a drift towards blended heat and defrost. You should check the ATC vacuum system as per the factory service manual for a vacuum leak or a vacuum servo internal leak. A system that is undercharged with refrigerant can loose some cooling at higher speeds because of refrigerant shrinkage but will not cause a default to the floor ducts. Did you check to see if any air was blowing out of the defrost ducts when the symptoms appeared? The ATC temperature sensor above the glove box assembly. can also be faulty as you suggest but it also cannot cause a default to heat at the floor ducts. Another possibility is some vacuum lines crossed under the dash or under the hood. Vacuum can leak anywhere that the vacuum is routed including the a/c vacuum reservoir and its Vacuum check valve. Engine vacuum can drop at higher speeds and if there is also a vacuum leak somewhere in the system, the controls cannot and will not maintain maximum cooling. I think that you will find that air is also blowing out of the defrost ducts when this heating occurs. In any case the a/c vacuum system should be tested in a logical sequence ( do not omit any a/c lines or vacuum motors) using the proper vacuum pump with a built in vacuum gauge and shop manual with the vacuum diagrams in order to pinpoint any leaks. Show this reply to your a/c mechanic. He may be experienced and able to locate the problem quickly. Some vacuum leaks can sometimes be spotted easily under the hood. We wish you a speedy repair.

Sincerely,

Bill

July 6, 2017

1968 Continental Will Not Turn Off

Hi Bill,

I have a 1968 4 door Lincoln Continental with the 462 engine. When I turn the key off the engine will not shut off, unless I turn the radio on?? I have replaced the Alternator and Voltage Regulator, but the problem has not gone away. It is like the coil is getting a back feed through the circuit somewhere. Any help you can give would be appreciated.

Thank you, Regards,

Aaron

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Greetings Aaron -

Some of these types of issues can be time consuming to diagnose but accurate diagnosis is very important. You need to know a few things about your car before trying to uncover the actual problem.

Did the problem begin after some" recent" repair or addition to the vehicle?

Do you have a non factory ignition system (Petronix etc)?

You could start testing at the ignition coil with the key in the off position and with the engine off. If you have power at the coil in this position you would need to test why power is available there in this off position. A proper wiring diagram and 12v test light is a must for the testing. The power path will lead from the coil to the ignition switch and also to the starter solenoid. A short inside the starter solenoid could cause the coil to be powered up with the key off. Unplugging that wire at the starter solenoid will remove the power to the coil if the solenoid is faulty. The other possibility is that the ignition switch or its electrical connection is shorted. Unplugging the ignition switch and carefully inspecting the plug will remove power to the coil if there is a problem in that area. You can observe the power at the ignition coil with every disconnect that you do to find out if that component is shorted etc.

I have no idea what the radio could have to do with your problem unless some unknown wiring deviation was added to your Lincoln. Do you know if any non factory wiring was ever added to your vehicle?

Sincerely,

Bill

1979 Mark V Draw On System

Bill -

I have a 3.5 amp draw that I can't find.I have a battery disconnect switch that I turn off when I'm not running the car. If it gets left on it will run the battery down over night. What I've done so far. Removed each fuse one at a time and checked the draw each time I remove a fuse. With the neg. battery cable disconnected I check with my amp meter between the neg.cable end, and the neg. battery post. All fused wiring checked good. I removed the battery cable to the alternator same 3.5 amp draw problem. Any ideas what it could be? It has to be something that is on all the time or a short somewhere.Thanks for any help.

Lyle

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Hello Lyle -

It sounds like you have been busy with that draw. Disconnecting components one at a time is a good idea and should expose the culprit. Have you checked the trunk light, under hood light and the glove box light carefully to be sure that no lights remain on when the trunk, hood and glove box are closed? Do you have any alarms, radios or other aftermarket accessories added to the car? How old is your battery? A battery load test and charge test may be a good idea even though you disconnect it overnight.

To check the charging system for a draw, ALL of the wires must be disconnected at the alternator as well as the voltage regulator. Your email indicates that only one wire is disconnected at the alternator for your test.

Sincerely,

Bill

July 5, 2017

1976 Mark IV Radio Removal

Hi Bill :) hoping you can help my Dad and I in removing the radio on my Lincoln. We have removed the cover for the instrument panel and can not figure out how to remove the simulated wood plate that the knob posts come through. The FM does not work and we want to replace it with another stock unit. I don't have a shop manual for it, I know it's probably a simple step I can't figure out. Can u please help? :) Thank you so much!!!

Michael

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Hi Michael -

Very nice choice of Lincoln to have and drive. I have one also with 32000 miles on it. That woodgrain mask may not need to be removed to service the radio. The radio removal procedure begins on page 35-01-06 in the factory service manual. If you are going be keeping the car and doing your own repairs, the correct set of manuals is an absolute must in order to save time and money. We may be able to send you a copy of the radio removal procedure from our files. A copy of the complete manuals is available from Lincoln Land when you are ready. Good luck with your "new" Mark !

Sincerely,

Bill

1971 Mark III Aftermarket Shock Question

Hallo Bill-

I recently purchased a Mark III - 1971. Because of the mileage my mechanic suggested replacing the shock-absorbers, which was fine with me. He installed the most basic, standard (cheapest) Monroes. But I don't like them. They feel too "light", not suitable for a 4750 lbs car. The car feels "wobbly" (lack of a better word) and unstable / unsafe especially at (European) standard highway speed, eg 75-80 mph. One can not hold the steering wheel straight and still for more than a couple of seconds, it needs constant re-adjusting and correcting. Where I live (Belgium) it is difficult to find reliable and/or technical information let alone other Mk III owners to share information with, hence I address you with my question. What is a good (the best?) replacement for the shock absorbers? Monroe is the most common brand in Europe (+service) although all other brands can be found and ordered (KYB, Gabriel etc) Based on what I read, and what would be my choice with what I know so far, Monroe Load Adjusting shocks are a good choice. (the "Monroe" brand just for the sake and ease of its broad service network over here - other brands have identical types) The car is daily used and doesn't carry / tow loads. Just me and the occasional passenger. What is your recommendation, all help and advice is most appreciated. Kind regards.

Samuel - Leuven, Belgium

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Greetings Den -

Because of the many shocks available and the many needs and wants of the owners we do not get too involved with the selection of these types of parts. If you are not happy with the shock absorbers that your mechanic has chosen you will need to speak to him for a correction.

More important than shock absorbers at this point in time is your description of the steering and handling of your Mark III. A vehicle that exhibits the symptoms such as you describe clearly needs to be immediately inspected and corrected by a competent "front end" technician. Your vehicle may have some serious worn out parts. We can supply most steering and suspension parts if needed.

Sincerely,

Bill

June 14, 2017

1979 Continental Sedan - New Owner Questions....

Hi Bill -

Recently I had to buy a Collectors Series ;) The car is a survivor with some flaws that I am addressing now. With two of them I could need some help: 1) the drivers side vent window does not go down properly. Instead of moving down, it is tilting forward and blocking. The vent is loose as you can take it by the upper end and tilt it in direction forward/afterward. When you press the vent to the main glass manually, the window will go properly through the whole cycle. I opened the door and found a round black piece of plastic that seems to have had a bolt in the center that is now broken. As well I found something like a green tip that might fit to the black plastic, broken as well. On the passenger side, the black round plastic was broken inside the door, however, the green tip is still in its place in the glass and the window is working properly (for the moment). Do you know what part I'm talking about? I did not find it in the manual and I don't know how its called or if there is any replacement. If yes, do you sell it? 2) When I got the car I tested everything, including power door lock. Unfortunately, the rear door locked and stuck. Now it does not open. How can I open the door to get access to the mechanism when the door is closed and locked? Or is there a way to lubricate without the door trim panel, as I cannot remove that with the door closed... Thanks for your help!

Severin

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Hi Severin -

Very nice choice of Lincoln. The dropping vent windows option is a nice extra but is known to give their share of problems after all of these years have passed since 1979. If a repair seems too complicated for you, we can repair some of these issues such as you describe depending on the extent of damage. We also may be able supply a used assembly if necessary. Please give George a call at our office for details.

Your power door lock issue sounds like the common seized Power Actuator problem. If you were to send your actuator in to us for testing we may be able to repair it or if necessary supply a new one. If you cannot trick the lock to open with the aid of an assistant operating the switch as you try to coax a release of the lock you may need the services of AAA or an experienced automobile " lock out " service. Again, call George at our office for further information etc.

Sincerely,

Bill

May 26, 2017

1963 Lincoln Continental Running On After Being Turned Off

Bill -

I just had my 1963 Lincoln convertible serviced. They changed the oil, complete brake job, changed two core plugs, and got the air conditioning system operating. We inherited this car and before taking it to get it serviced the engine did not make much noise. I just received the car back yesterday. I went on two drives and when I turned the car off, the engine started to rattle and make banging noises. What is the potential issue here? I have also been putting in 87 ethanol free gas, could that be an issue? I have been concerned putting in any gas mixed with ethanol as I am pretty sure the car has not been modernized to take any percentage of ethanol fuel, even fuel mixed with 10% ethanol. Any help and recommendations are appreciated.

Will

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Hi Will -

Your description sounds very strongly like the engine has too fast of an idle when at operating temperature and is Dieseling a.k.a. Running On instead of shutting off immediately when the key is turned off. Show your mechanic the problem. It may turn out to be a simple carburetor adjustment that he can handle in a very short time. This is a common occurrence with all high compression engines. That engine should be using Premium high octane fuel.

Sincerely,

Bill

May 25, 2017

1969 Mark III Leaking Oil, Follow Up and Reply....

Hello Bill,

My name is Gianni and I have a concern regarding my timing cover on my 460. I have the crank driven pump which I recently rebuilt and works great, and had replaced my timing cover with another because of some damage my original had. I took all precautionary steps to get a good seal on the cover, and cover to pump seal, but I have a rather large leak coming from this area. It looks to be coming from the back of the power steering pump and is definitely engine oil. I can still drive around, but have to check the level frequently. Do you know what could be wrong, the pump doesn't leak, but the seal behind it seems to be faulty?

Thanks

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Greetings Gianni -

Several possibilities for your engine oil leak come to mind after reading your email. These are.... the crankshaft oil slinger was omitted during installation of the front cover. This could allow engine oil to scour the front seal with excess oil splash that the seal was never designed to handle. Next is the possibility of .......An incorrect or damaged front cover (at the seal area) was installed. This would cause a poor sealing situation. Another possibility is that the special seal between the front cover and the p/s pump was damaged, not installed at all or the original was not replaced with a new one and was already severely aged and ineffective after the removal and replacement procedure. What are the possibilities for any of the above suggestions?

Sincerely,

Bill

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Bill -

It's hard to say? I installed a new rubber seal to the cover and made sure everything was prepped cleanly. Are 1969 covers different from those that have the 1968 year stamped on them? They looked exactly the same.

Gianni

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It's hard for you to say?? It's even harder for me to say.....from here. The front covers for 460s with crank mounted p/s pumps should all be the same. Did we supply this cover or any other parts? The facts are that if every thing was prepped cleanly and assembled correctly and you have an oil leak at that area as you described, the pump will need to be removed again and that area inspected. Are you sure that the leak is not somehow coming from higher up from the rear of the pump? What about the possibility of the oil slinger omission that was suggested to you in my first reply?

Bill

May 23, 2017

1979 Continental Sedan Battery Drain

Bill -

I have a 1979 Lincoln Continental Sedan and this last year it seems to be draining its battery while it is sitting. I put a meter on the battery and it reads 12.7 as soon as I turn off the car. While it is running it is 13.8. I know newer cars the alternator produces 14.3, but not 100% sure on this one. It seems to take about an hour to drain it down to 12.2 where at this point the starter will only click, which I expect. If I boost it at this point, it fires right back up. I should notice observations at this point. A new behaviour is; I can wind down the windows and use the radio with the key off as well as pop the trunk & run the heater blower. My guesses at this point are: a relay somewhere or the alternator regulator is bad. I can continue to drive the car and I just uncouple the negative when I stop for any period of time. Any thoughts or advise would be appreciated as I'm grasping at directions to search.

Tom

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Hi Tom -

If your readings are correct, 12.2 volts at the posts of a good battery is more than enough to crank and start that engine. After turning off the engine it is not abnormal for the voltage to drop somewhat from 12.7. I suspect that the battery is aged or faulty and therefore a load test at an automotive electrical shop would be necessary to verify the battery condition. If you suspect the alternator or a regulator, they alone could be disconnected during a period of non use to prove or disprove an internal electrical draw. Of course, all other cable connections must be correct and in good order.

After the above electrical draw is corrected and the newer accessory power problem that you have described still exists you will need to trace that circuit with the use of the proper manual and wiring diagrams. This type of diagnosis is best done in a logical sequence by a technician with this type of electrical experience.

Sincerely,

Bill

May 16, 2017

1967 Continental Coupe Running Issues & Update

Hi Bill,

I drive my Lincoln around for about 10 minutes with no problems, then eventually the accelerator starts to give up and when I press the accelerator it makes a whining sound. When its on idle it doesn't make the whining sound, only when I accelerate. I have to pull over and let it rest for 10 minutes in order to drive it again for 10 minutes and encounter the same problem. Any ideas on what can cause this? I have an electric ignition source too wondering if that's the reason... please help.

Alex

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Greetings Alex -

The description of your issue really provides me with very little information to even guess what your problem could be. The fact that you also offer no information on what has been already checked or inspected by yourself or your mechanic also adds to my problem in diagnosing.

What does " eventually the accelerator starts to give up" mean?

Whining and squealing suggests something as easy as a loose drive belt or a noisy electric fuel pump (if you have had one installed). If the engine simply stops running after 10 minutes you could be experiencing a plugging fuel filter, a failing fuel pump, old fuel from a contaminated fuel tank etc etc. For all that I know your Lincoln may have been sitting unused and untuned for many years.

Can you supply us with more and helpful information that may lead to some better suggestions for you.

We probably can't help with your after market electronic ignition without having the vehicle here to do our own testing.

Sincerely,

Bill

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Yeah sorry,

Ok so I start my 1967 Lincoln Continental Coupe and it starts up fine. As I get 10 minutes or so into driving normally, when I step on the accelerator it hesitates and very little power is given into the throttle. Also at the same time is makes this weird whining noise only when I press the accelerator. It can idle fine no problem no noise.

If I park it for 10 minute and let it rest then fire it back up it runs and drives fine again for 10 minute or so.

When I step on the accelerator it seems like it rubs on something and makes this whining noise and also shakes sometimes. This all happens after 10 minutes of driving. Before that it drives smooth and accelerator works fine.

I did have the power steering pump and transmission box repaired because of a leak.

How do you think I should start to diagnose this problem.

Thanks -

Alex

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Alex -

I would start by having your mechanic open the hood and inspect the complete accelerator linkage for some sort of interference. You should be aware that some of the linkage on this model is located under the floor at the accelerator pedal. It has a flexible bellows attached to prevent moisture intrusion. The linkage and structure at this location is known to corrode, seize and subsequently cause problems.
Then the accessory engine drive belts should be checked for condition and looseness. This type of problem may require some on scene diagnosis by only an experienced technician in order to pinpoint the issue quickly and correctly. For the next step, the engine should be running and the whining noise should be in the audible stage for you to try to locate the cause during the diagnosis. Your issue could even prove to be a carburetor problem. The above suggestions and my previous reply are the best that I can supply at this point based on the information that you have provided. I also assume that your engine and related engine parts are stock and in good order. Be sure to use extra caution and safety measures around a running engine. Let us know if anything is found during the inspections.

Sincerely,

Bill

April 20, 2017

1969 Mark III Electrical Issues

Hi Bill,

I appreciate all you do to support Lincoln owners! I have a problem with my '69 Mark III. I purchased the car four years ago. A previous owner had disconnected the passenger side window motor from the original wiring and installed his own toggle switch and wiring. He installed it the dash ashtray where the lighter used to be. Pretty crazy but it worked!
I recently had a need to replace the front passenger side glass and decided to try to get the power window functioning with the original wiring and switches. I reconnected the motor to the original wiring. Not to surprising to see that the window would not operate with the door switches. I started pushing and pulling on various connectors. Low and behold, when I squeezed the window motor connector the motor worked using the door switches (driver and passenger switches). I unplugged the connected and adjusted the make and female connectors to improve the connection. Without squeezing the connector the window continued to function.

Once I had everything back together it no longer worked. I removed the metal trim from the door pad and wiggled the switch wires and the switch connector. Window was once again working!

Now I occasionally have a condition when it stops working. The drivers side window is also acting up but not as often. When I operate the power window switches (when the motors are not working) I do hear a click and I are the interior lights dim. I am wondering if this could all be related to a bad relay or a bad ground some where? When working, the motors raise and lower the windows quickly so they appear to be good.

Any ideas?

Thanks,

Brent

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Hi Brent -

There are many things that can go wrong with power windows. You have already identified one of them. Why not repair all of those bad connections first instead of wiggling wires and hoping.

We have the wiring diagram available to you at no charge. Sign in as a 1969 Mark III once you're on our Website, go to the REFERENCE - TECH INFORMATION & PARTS DIAGRAMS section and Click on the Wiring Diagram.

Then you can move on to the switches and the other problems one at a time. It does seem from your description of the previous work that you will find much more to discover and repair.

Sincerely,

Bill

April 17, 2017

1979 Mark V Free Play In Steering

Hi Bill,

I bought a 1979 Mark V December 2016.It has an excessive amount steering wheel free play. After I bought new tiers I had the front end aligned. The only worn part was the left tie rod end, and they replaced both sides. Is there a steering box adjustment to adjust the free play? Driving down a straight road is not good because of the free play. I also have a 1957 Ford Sunliner that has an adjustment screw on top of steering box to adjust the free play. Dose my Lincoln have an an adjustment like that? I haven't been able to find one.You have a great web site.

Thanks for any help,

Lyle

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Greetings Lyle,

You post that the only worn part was a tie rod end and then you state that there is free play in the steering box. Free play in the box can also be caused by worn internal parts. The adjustment on the box will not remove play that is caused by worn bushings etc. within the steering box. In my opinion you will need to visit another front end shop and explain the situation to them. The technician will then inspect your steering box very carefully after a road test and advise you. If you were at our shop at Lincoln Land we would lift your Mark and examine your steering system after road testing. The poor steering is usually caused by the sum of all of the worn parts and looseness. The initial road test by the technician is very important in order to perform correct and complete diagnosis.

Sincerely,

Bill

1959 Will Not Restart When Hot - New Engine Rebuild

Bill,

Restoring a 59 Mark IV. Had the engine professionally rebuilt, preformed break in on motor, but as the car gets warmed up, when I turn the car off - it will not crank back up until the car cools down for 15 minutes. We have replaced coil, points, condensor, temp sending switch was also replace at rebuild.

Signed,

pulling my hair out

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Orlando,

When this happens ALL of the general tune up items need to be verified. As well as the items that you have already tested, checked or replaced this will include battery and all starter and ground cables, starter, spark plugs, carburetor and choke etc. Other possibilities are engine severely overheating or the crankshaft vibration damper slipping and subsequently causing you an incorrect timing reading. If all of the above is in good order it may be time to contact your rebuilder. Good rebuilders will immediately become involved in these situations.

Sincerely,

Bill

April 10, 2017

1978 Mark V High Beam Question

Hi Bill -

Is there a way to manually control the high beams with the switch on the floor in a 1978 Lincoln Mark V? I turn the auto dimmer to off and press the dip switch with my foot and nothing seems to happen. At other times all 4 head lights light up. I do not seem to be able to consistently control them. Alternatively, is there a simple way/fix way to keep them on all the time? I have to drive through some dark streets to get home and do not want to hit a deer.

Thanks in advance,

Dean

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Hello Dean -

You are correct. If you rotate the H/L dimmer rheostat to the extreme position into the auto dim "off " detent position, the system should then be in the manual mode. This will be shown in the owners manual as well as the maintenance manual. There is also a 4 amp in line fuse under the dash that can be pulled as an additional test. If this does not work, the system will need to be diagnosed as per the maintenance manual. I would probably start the testing at the foot switch. We do have owners manuals and shop manuals available for shipping.

Sincerely,

Bill

March 31, 2017

1969 Thunderbird Climate Control Question

Bill,

My 1969 T-bird has only 62k original miles and only blows air through the defroster. How can I repair this problem? The blower motor works great; I just need to control the air, either through the vents, floor defroster, etc. If I need to replace a part, could you let me know which part? Thank you for your advice.

John

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John -

The 68-71 Thunderbird ATC (Automatic Temperature Control) has the exact same system and parts as the 69-71 Mark III. We have parts in stock, and we can also rebuild the servo assembly and ATC Box. You can repair yours with correct diagnosing as per the Shop Manual. Loss of vacuum supply to the controls is a very good possibility from your description. Loss of vacuum on that system will cause the unit to default to the Defrost and Heat in all settings except Off. This could be an easy fix for you.

Sincerely,

Bill

1977 Town Car New Owner With "Burning Belts"

Hey Bill -

My issue is i just bought a 77 Town Car with the 460 engine, it runs good but keeps burning belts. I get about 4 or 5 miles and it starts burning. I have checked alignment and replaced alternator with the belt. I have tried different types of belts (solid and notched belts), but same results. The only thing I can think of was the crank pulley has a burr. I will clean the pulley, but after that have no where to go if it doesn't work please help.

Anthony

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Hello Anthony -

This is the first time that I have heard of a belt burning every 4 or 5 miles with no apparent reason. I do have some ideas but because I cannot view the engine area, I need to ask some questions. Did you recently purchase this Lincoln in this condition from the seller? Did you speak to the seller about this problem? Do you know any history of any repairs to the engine at all? With this information I may be able to suggest some possible suspect areas for you to examine.

Sincerely,

Bill

March 27, 2017

1978 Town Coupe Electrical Issues, New Owner

Hey Bill,

First of all, I want to comment on how great this website is! I haven't seen anything like it, and I love how thorough it is for navigating problems!
I've read a few similar situations where Lincolns in my year range are running into door lock problems, but please see below:

I recently acquired a 1978 Lincoln Continental Town Coupe (Triple Black ) I have 2 issues with it. Firstly, neither of the door locks are working. There is no noise coming from them at all. I'm confident I found a thread on another forum that may work (pull the door panels off and trace the wires back to the fuse box) but I'm concerned because the keys wont even turn in the cylinder, and if I push the lock button I don't hear anything. I can't force them to lock by pushing the pin down either. Secondly, the one that concerns me most is that the instrument/dash cluster seems to be at half power. The fuel gauge doesn't work, but the tach does -- as do a few of the lights intermittently. Needless to say, this is frustrating because you have to remember how much gas that 460 has burnt thru. The fuses seem to be fine -- I've replaced the questionable ones, but with no luck. I put in a new alternator and battery, and the problem is still there.

Thanks!

Dillon

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Hi Dillon -

The most common problem with this era of Lincoln power door locks is the door lock actuators themselves that are located inside the doors.
The dash light problem could be the dash light rheostat that is located at and is part of the headlight switch itself.

The fuel gauge issue could be the fuel sending unit that is located inside the fuel tank. This a possible and a very popular fail part. However, all of your issues need to be diagnosed in a logical sequence in order to pinpoint any electrical problems correctly in order to avoid replacing parts that are not faulty.

Guessing is not a great method.

The operation and diagnosis is explained in the Factory Maintenance manuals and Wiring Diagrams. Do you have any of these publications? We have these available if you need them and can send them to your address. They are very useful for these and future problems with your recent Lincoln purchase. If needed please call us and ask for George to make arrangements.

Sincerely,

Bill

March 9, 2017

1969 Continental Sedan Rear Light Questions

Hello Bill,

First, thank you for providing information to everyone. It's much appreciated.

I was wondering how to get access to the rear tail lights on my 69 Continental 4 Door Sedan. The old sockets are pretty bad and they don't have the spring back action to them so I can't turn in a new light bulb. I have the replacement sockets but I am having a difficult time getting to the old ones.

Also on the rear tail lights on the 69 Continental, there is a clear lens and then a small red lens directly underneath it. I know the clear lens is for the reverse light but what are the small red lenses directly underneath the reverse ones for? I changed bulbs but they still don't turn on. I would assume they're for brakes but not too sure. Any assistance would be appreciated. Thanks in advance.

Regards,

Juann

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Greetings Juann -

The small red lights on the rear quarter panels are not brake lights. They are side marker lights that are powered by the running lamp circuit. Side marker lamps were mandated to all of our automakers starting around 1968. With this feature (front and rear) the vehicle can be seen easier from the side at night. Some are of a simple design and some (as your Lincoln is) were more of a pleasing ornate design.

To service the tail light socket assemblies in the bumper you will need to remove the rear bumper in order to comfortably remove the two lamp bodies that each house the three sockets. Be sure to first disconnect and free up the wiring to the light assemblies, including the license plate illumination light to avoid tearing apart the wires. This is probably the best way to deal with these sockets if you need to somehow repair or replace them properly.

Sincerely,

Bill

March 6, 2017

1979 Mark V Rear View Mirror

Bill -

My rear view mirror has become unglued from the windshield. Any thoughts on how to fix?

Thanks,

Gerry

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Hi Gerry -

If your mirror has become detached from the windshield and is not broken, the first thought that jumps out at me is to reattach it. You can have this done quickly at a local well known automotive glass shop of your choice. They are experienced with this occurrence and should have the latest and best commercial product available for the task. If you wish to do it yourself, many glass adhesive kits are widely available for the job at local auto parts stores such as NAPA, Advance and O'Reilly's, etc. However, the directions must be followed carefully. We cannot recommend any one brand over the other though or any particular store. A missing mirror makes driving uncomfortable and less safe therefore we wish you a speedy repair.

Sincerely,

Bill

February 28, 2017

THE TOP SIX - VACUUM OPERATED HEADLAMP COVER PROBLEMS

1. System Check Valve (internal leak)
2. Servo Motor(s) (leak)
3. Headlight Switch (leak)
4. Vacuum Hoses and Tubes (leaks)
5. Vehicles equipped with Auto Lamp option - Solenoid Valve (internal vacuum leak)
6. Previous Owner or Mechanic has unknowingly disabled the System.


NOTE: A correct Vacuum Diagram and a Hand Held Vacuum Pump are strongly advised for diagnosis.

February 16, 2017

1969 Mark III Headlight Door Issues

Bill -

Good Morning and thank you for this site. I have been troubleshooting the vacuum system for a headlight door problem. I can hear vacuum hissing when the headlight switch is in the ON position. Is this designed to dump vacuum when the car is running in order to keep the lights open?

Greg

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Greetings Greg -

Several threads have been posted previously on this blog that are related to this subject. They can be located and read also. The short answer to your question is yes, there will be a short vacuum sound when the headlamp covers are repositioning to the open or closed mode. However, the system is not designed to constantly "dump" vacuum.

In a proper operating vacuum headlamp system on your Mark III, vacuum flow should be heard for a few seconds only when the Headlight switch is moved to the H/lamps On or Off position. When the switch is moved to either position (with the vacuum system charged and maintaining engine vacuum) vacuum is reversed to the opposite side of the dual port Headlamp Vacuum Servos located at the the H/L doors. During this vacuum reversal and subsequent repositioning of the headlamp doors a vacuum sound will be detected from the vacuum portion of the switch for only approximately 3-5 seconds as the vacuum is reversing . If you are still hearing a vacuum "leaking" sound from this system after the doors are repositioned, a leak must exist somewhere in the vacuum system. If this is so, the leak will continue when he engine is turned Off and the h/l doors will open in a short time period until the engine is started again.

To diagnose and locate a leak, a good vacuum diagram and some knowledge of how the system operates will be a great help to you. Remember though that the h/l switch can be cracked and leaking BUT with only a leaking sound at the switch does not prove for sure that the switch is faulty. With a large leak elsewhere, the sound that you are hearing could possibly be the vacuum rushing through the switch towards the large leak. If a leak is strongly suspected at the switch, it should be removed and the vacuum portion bench tested. The above are only possibilities that we have encountered in the past. The system consists of many connections and hoses that can cause leaks. Many times we find multiple leaks in some vehicles. Accurate diagnosis and patience is required to pinpoint the culprit. At Lincoln Land we stock many parts to repair these systems.

Sincerely,

Bill

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Bill -

Thank you. I did find a cracked hose going to the firewall. One of the vacuum cans has a "built in" check valve. Do you know the best way to test that? I have been from the bumper to firewall, checked vac motors for leaks, lines for leaks, check valves for operation, cans for leaks, and I am now inside the dash looking at the vac motors on the climate control system. My climate system is not follwing the troubleshooting flow chart (in the black repair manual) by changing air flow through the dash outlets when it should. I think I can hear hissing in that area, but my years of race cars and loud music is hurting the diagnosis. Your information is very helpful and I thank you! This year I am determined to find the problem.

Greg

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Greg -

The vacuum check valves which are located in the rubber hose lines or integral with a reservoir are a simple device. They allow engine vacuum to flow into the vacuum system that they serve but when a period of low engine vacuum occurs or the engine is shut off, the vacuum is sealed in the system at the valve so that it is not lost back to the engine. When vacuum resumes at the check valve from the engine, the vacuum will now flow again as necessary through the valve as designed.

We like to use a hand held vacuum pump to diagnose and verify the integrity and operation of any suspect components such as the check valves. Good luck with your diagnosis and repair.

Sincerely,

Bill

February 7, 2017

1963 Continental Starting Issues

Hey Bill!

Thank you for helping all us Lincoln lovers! I'm having issues starting my 63 Continental and was wondering if you had any advice? The car will not crank, fan doesn't move etc. When I turn the key it just makes a nasty sound like someone that doesn't know how to use a clutch. I've replaced the starter, starter cable, and starter solenoid, plus tested the battery (12.6volts). The car still makes the same sound. When I first tried starting it the fan would turn a little then stop and the nasty sound would start. I tried the hammer to the starter trick but that just made it worse. I'm thinking that the starter is not engaging with the flywheel. When I installed the new starter it went in perfectly and I used all the same bolts, washers, etc. Before installing the starter I looked at the flywheel (portion that I could see) and didn't notice any broken teeth etc. The old starter didn't have any damaged teeth either. I just got my car back from my mechanic a few weeks ago and drove it around the block once before parking it in the garage. I haven't been able to start it since! My mechanic specializes in 60's continentals. He just replaced the brake booster, oil pan gasket, rear diff gasket, and motor mounts. He recommended I get my rear main gasket replaced sometime when I can afford it. I don't believe they would've separated the tranny from motor. Any thoughts on getting my car back on the road?

Thank you again,

Matt

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Greetings Matt -

If your starter electrical circuit including the cables and battery ( there are other battery tests besides voltage) are in good order as you describe I would begin by removing the starter and inspecting the flywheel very carefully. This would involve rotating the crankshaft manually as the flywheel is thoroughly examined for cracks, warping, looseness and damaged teeth. Your Lincoln mechanic will understand what I am suggesting. If all of the above is in good order the starter motor should be tested by the re builder for proper operation in all respects.

Sincerely,

Bill

February 3, 2017

1976 Mark IV Blower Only Working On Maximum Setting

Bill-

I have a 76 Mark IV Lipstick Edition with 15k actual miles. I have worked on Lincolns for the last 25 years, and enjoy the challenge. The blower will only work on maximum. All vents work, defog, vacuum open and close as they should. I ordered a blower relay from Lincoln Land, fitted it just the same. The terminals are like new and clean. Like most low miles cars, I do not know weather to use it more and see if it springs back into life, or investigate more. The car is like new all original everywhere you look. Your thoughts would be appreciated.

Kind regards,

Dave in the United Kingdom

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Hi Dave -

Some of these electrical problems can be challenging at times. The function of the blower relay is to connect the blower motor directly to the battery through a fuse link only when Max Blower is selected. When you select a Lower speed the relay is de-energized and another connection is made between two wires within the relay for all other speeds. These two wires can be temporarily jumped together ( with the relay disconnected ) as a test for proper continuity inside the relay. The wire colors to jump should be, The large gauge Orange with a Black tracer and Light Green with a White tracer. Unplug the relay and jump these two wires together temporarily as a test. Turn the key to the on position with the blower switch on a lower speed. If the blower motor now begins to operate with these two wires jumped but is non operative when the plug is again attached to the relay, you could have faulty relays. If the blower still does not start you will need to trace the blower circuit as per the wiring diagram. In either event please contact us so that we can correct a possible faulty relay for you or help you proceed to the next diagnostic step. Do you have a proper wiring diagram for the HVAC system for your Mark IV ?

Sincerely,

Bill

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Bill -

Unplugged the replacement relay, crossed the two wires, black and orange. Green white, turned ignition on, nothing, not a flicker. Still no low or high.

Regards,

Dave

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Hi Dave -

It sounds like you have jumped the correct wires The first wire actually should be orange with a black stripe though. On the Lower speed setting the green wire with a white stripe should have power from the system unless the engine is cold and the ATC is calling for heat. Check for power at that wire with a warm engine and the control set on the lower speed. If there is power at that green/white wire try the jump test again. There should be two 20 amp fuses in the fuse box for the climate control that can be checked with a 12 v test light. If still no power at the green / white wire (with a warm engine running and the control set on a lower speed range), a wiring diagram will be necessary for you to trace the power path properly. As an added test, the relays can easily be bench tested with the use of "continuity tester" applied to the two pins on the relay that the above two previously jumped wires attach to on the relay. Do you have a correct wiring diagram to aid you in further testing?
Sincerely,

Bill

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Bill -

Problem sorted. Bad connection at the back of blower switch. Pushed it well home ,and working great on all settings. Thanks for your help and assistance.

Regards,

Dave

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Hi Dave -

We are happy that you have found and corrected your problem. Your next step would have been to trace the power path on the green/white wire from the high blower relay plug using the wiring diagram. The loose connection at the switch would have been found during the diagnosis. Good work and perseverance on your part proved to be successful in correcting this issue. We were glad to assist.

Sincerely,

Bill

January 30, 2017

1977 Mark V Rough Idle

Bill -

I purchased a car out of Ohio shortly after it won a primary first at the 2016 Mid-America meet. We drove up to see the car after preliminary negotiations on the phone. I have had the hots for a Mark V for decades. We fell in love with the car immediately. The fact that it is Bright Gold Diamond-Fire and I am a second-generation Georgia Tech fan was probably a contributing factor to my lust.

I did notice that the idle was pretty rough and the owner and I talked about this. He gave me the list of the repairs that he had had made to the car, sang the praises of his garage man, and indicated that their conclusion was that the carburetor needed to be rebuilt. The car was showing 6744 miles when we left Ohio, DMV Data suggests that number is accurate.

We made a leisurely three day trip home, and the rough idle didn't improve a bit during the trip. Since returning home, the following has been accomplished:

The carburetor has been rebuilt, The EGR valve has been replaced, the coil, distributor cap and rotor have been replaced, the spark plugs have been removed cleaned and gapped, The fan clutch has been replaced, the three heat sensitive vacuum valves (ported vacuum switches) and the tubing have been replaced, vacuum supply has been tested at multiple points in the engine bay and has been found to be according to specifications and strong. We discovered that the engine control vacuum tubing was not installed as depicted in the shop manual and have corrected that. Cylinder compression tests have been performed and compression was found to be uniform and strong-135 psi plus or minus a little. The alternator has been found to have two bad diodes and has been rebuilt. We also replaced the voltage regulator.

Throughout all of this, cylinder number six seems to be under performing. When you pull the plug-wire off of number six with the engine running it has less effect on the smoothness of the engine than does any other cylinder. We have changed the wire on number six, swapped spark plugs from 1 to 6 and from 5 to 6 but still number six under-performs.

Someone suggested a broken valve spring on number six so we pulled the valve cover and physically inspected the spring both stationary and while operating and found no fault.

My friend/mechanic is a retired engineer who has been maintaining old Fords for the local TBird club for years. I can't claim much mechanical ability for myself but he understands the engine and he is capable of reading and understanding the shop manual.

We are pretty much out of ideas. Still love the car but when you are standing at a stoplight with your foot on the break, the vibration is disheartening. It smooths out at speed but I am told that the engine has enough torque to overcome or mask the under-performing cylinder at higher RPM.

Any suggestions you might give us?


Martin


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Hi Martin -

After reading your letter several times to understand what has already been done, you might want to see if the correct firing order has ever been verified. You could also do a engine vacuum test and compare the readings with the shop manual readings. Any out of spec. vacuum readings should be shown in the shop manual and the cause explained.
The car has very low mileage and is 40 years old. That is only 170 miles per year! It would be very helpful to know the history of this issue. For all we know, this engine could have had this problem for 30 years or even at 1000 miles! Do you have any further information on this engine from any other previous owners? Any paper work would also make interesting reading.

Let us know.

Bill

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Bill -

Thank you very much for your response. We have, in fact, verified the firing order by two independent mechanics. It is now said that the vacuum is not "rock solid" from the cylinder bank containing #6. The conclusion is that there is an internal engine problem (valve, valve guide, cam lobe) on that bank. The hard idle history is sketchy but may have existed for a very long time.

We are now contemplating going into the engine. I have now purchased two cars with major problems that I did not detect prior to purchase.

Martin

January 23, 2017

Power Window Advice For ALL Models.... Simple & Effective

Greetings -

The following has been suggested previously on this blog.

As most of us car collectors already know, issues with power windows are common and can be annoying and costly to repair. One of the most common issues that can occur is when the window mechanism becomes "stuck" in the up position when the vehicle is parked and the power windows are unused for a period of time.

While the car is parked and the windows are in the up position (at the up stops), the mechanism remains under stress and pressure. The plastic drive gear parts are then subject to quicker cracking and decomposing. The window regulator arms along with the inner metal door panels can deform slightly adding even more tension to the mechanism. When the window is finally operated, the plastic gear drive parts can fail or at a later date finish disintegrating. The motor will still operate but cannot drive the window down or up.

The above of course does not happen in all cases but is common enough to cause concern. The "tip" here is simply to lower the windows very very slightly at the time of parking and lengthy non use of the car. A slight flick of each p/w switch will drop the glass 1/32" or less. During the period of non use the window mechanisms will not be under stress and will in most cases, operate for you immediately when needed. I have been using this method on all of my cars for many years with excellent results. Of course all power windows are subject to many other problems and the above mentioned parts can still fail from age but they will fail much less when the above suggestion is used.

We have most power window repair parts on hand here at Lincoln Land should you ever need them.

Sincerely,

Bill

January 11, 2017

"Do it Yourself" Repairing and Maintaining Your Lincoln Tips

Performing some of your own repairs and maintenance on your Lincoln can be rewarding in so many ways. Besides saving labor expense a successful repair gives you a nice sense of accomplishment. Over a period of time and several repairs, you as the owner can really get to know your car and how to go about diagnosing and approaching many of the issues that will confront you as a Lincoln owner.

Before "tearing" into a problem you should do a little research into the issue as it pertains to your vehicle. This can be done with the use of the correct Maintenance Manual and the correct Wiring Diagram for the car. Prior to embarking on a repair or adjustment etc., knowing the answer to such questions as when did the malfunction begin to occur, did it start immediately after another repair was performed or was the car purchased with the problem already happening? Being aware of the answers to these and other questions can really help in the correct diagnosis.

Knowing how to properly read your wiring diagrams is an art form in some cases as many factory publications are very congested and can be difficult to follow. Paying attention to the wire color codes etc. and having patience along with proper diagnostic habits and simple testing equipment can really pay off in the long run and save hours of frustration and unnecessary expense. As an example, consider that a fuse that is continuing to blow occasionally could be protecting other unknown circuits as well as the one that you are trying to repair. Learning this from the wiring diagram before starting a repair may suggest other logical avenues of approach in order to locate the culprit. On the other hand proceeding without this information can many times lead you to wasted hours and/or excess cost.

The above are just a few tips to help owners pinpoint some of the troubling issues that we all must deal with sooner or later. If any of these tips seem to help some of our customers, we will continue to include them occasionally in the Lincoln Land blog.

Sincerely,

Bill

December 19, 2016

1982 Mark VI Performance Issues

Bill -

I don't drive my 1982 Mark VI anymore, and days between short drives of just a few miles in town. Started noticing the idle increasing 8 months ago slowly over time, and the speed it wanted to go increased as the engine warmed up and then suddenly work fine after off for 30 minutes sometimes. Then a week ago I started it up and it started bucking and didn't want to run in gear, but as the engine warmed up it got a little better, but when I stopped for a few minutes at a store it didn't want to restart, even with it spinning fast, so I floored it and it sputtered to life, and I got home. Days later it started fine but acted the same way, but then at the same shop on restart no sign of trying to start, even floored. Towed it home and the next day today it started fine again but acting the same way. I am suspecting the EGR was sticking some, and now a lot. What would be your guess?

Dwight

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Greetings Dwight -

Could you forward your customer number so that we may look up your account with us? Also it would be helpful to know the tune up history of your Lincoln and what you have done so far to diagnose or correct your engine issue. The engine management system for your 1982 Mark VI engine was sophisticated for these early years of automotive electronics and therefore requires a shop manual to assist in pinpointing the culprit in a logical sequence. If a component such as the EGR is suspect for any reason, it should be tested as per the manual before replacing. "Guessing" is not a wise option. Do you have a shop manual or do you have a mechanic that has a factory shop manual along with some technical experience with these vehicles?

There is not an over abundance of Lincoln collectors who collect these early 80's years of Marks and many parts are becoming difficult to locate as time goes by. In your case there are some on going on line forums available for specific eras of vehicle whose members may have had experience with your exact issue and similar engine management problems.

Sincerely,

Bill

December 13, 2016

1989 Town Car Shifting Question

Bill -

I just purchased this vehicle and had the engine professionally replaced since the previous owner overheated it and blew the heads. The transmission was also serviced. I was driving it and noticed that shifting from first to second was fine but from second to third there is a delay where the RPM's go up before shifting smoothly into third. Is this a normal function of that transmission type?

Robert

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Greetings Robert -

What you are describing is certainly not normal behavior for that automatic transmission. The best advice is to take the car to a trusted transmission shop and have it road tested and evaluated for a possible internal transmission problem. A good transmission mechanic familiar with that era of Lincoln will also be able to ascertain if the transmission linkage and controls etc. were assembled and adjusted correctly during the recent engine replacement and transmission service.

Sincerely,

Bill

December 1, 2016

1967 Continental Starting Issues

Hi Bill -

I am working on my 67 Lincoln 4 door Sedan with the 462 engine and am having starting problems. I should say that the car is mechanically fully rebuilt and ran great, but was sitting for a while and now it seems that the gas in the carb drains back into the gas tank or disappears somehow, because the car wont start for a while till the carbs fill up and then it runs fine with no dying or hesitation - that's what it feels like. Any advice would be greatly appreciated.

Thanks,

Fred

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Greetings Fred -

The modern ethanol fuels tend to evaporate quicker than the fuels of the sixties. The fuel cannot drain back into the fuel tank. I would first do a complete fuel system test. This will include a fuel pump pressure and volume test as per the shop manual and an inspection of the fuel lines hoses and possibly the fuel pickup in the fuel tank. The fuel pump must supply the correct volume and pressure in order to fill the carburetor quickly on an engine that has been sitting for a period of time. The pumps can be weak and/or the push rod that operates it could be worn to less than the necessary 4 and 13/16 " to operate it properly.

Sincerely,

Bill

1994 Continental Wiper Issues

Bill -

When the wipers are on Full does it still run through the intermittent Governor. My wipers stop after 10 minutes of driving, kick back in 10-15 minutes later. Today they did not kick back on. I opened the hood and when I closed it must jarred something because they started to work. What should I check as it is intermittent.

Randy

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Randy -

We usually diagnose these issues as per the shop manual. In your case and as a start, an examination of the hidden wiper linkage first for debris that has accumulated could be a good idea. Next would be to check for loose electrical connections at the motor etc. Be advised however that we do not have too many parts available for this year and model of Continental.

Sincerely,

Bill

November 28, 2016

1979 Mark V Blower Motor Removal

Bill -

I can't find a procedure in my Factory Shop Manual for removal of the Blower Motor for my 1979 Mark V.

Thank you -

Ken

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Hi Ken -

That procedure seems to have been omitted from the 1979 shop manual. We are sending you the procedure from the 1972 manual for a Thunderbird. this should be the correct procedure for your 1979 Mark. Please let us know if this works for you. We stock many parts for your vehicle and we look forward to your first purchase from us.
Sincerely,

Bill

1969 Mark III Headlight Indicator

Hey Bill,

My headlight indicator light at the top started acting weird. Normally, I'm pretty sure it only lights up for a second or two right after you turn on the lights. But now, it stays lit up when I have my headlights on. If I had the lights on and quickly switched it off-then-on, it lights up instantly and stays on. If I turn it off, wait a few seconds, then turn them back on, it lights up after a few seconds and stays on. I'm worried, because I don't want the light to over heat the panel or plastic. Any help will be appreciated, thanks.

John

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Greetings John -

You don't mention if you have the Automatic Headlamp Dimmer option. If you have this option and it is turned ON, the system may be trying to warm up and operate. The owners manual will explain this operation to you if you have one. Or are you referring to one of the over head panel light indicators above the windshield. This light advises you if the headlamp covers are open or not with the headlamps turned on. The manual should explain this operation as well.

Sincerely,

Bill

October 18, 2016

1973 Continental Starter Removal Issues

Hi Bill,

I am replacing the starter on my 73 Continental. I can get the existing starter disconnected but when it comes to actually removing from the car the steering linkage is in the way. I saw in an earlier response you suggested disconnecting the idler from the frame. I also read in an old Mitchell manual I have that I may need to turn the wheels to the right and disconnect the idler. The only problem is I still don't think I have enough room to wiggle it out and away from the car. I also thought about trying to take off the solenoid to gain more wiggle room but I don't know if that's a good idea. Any suggestions? Please feel free to email me directly, thanks!

Tom

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Hello Tom -

The removal of the starter is shown on page 28-03-04 of the 1973 Factory Shop Manual for that style of starter on the 460 cid engine. It describes turning the steering linkage for a right turn and disconnecting the idler arm from the vehicle frame in order to maneuver the starter out on the Mark IV. There may also be a brace in the way and blocking removal that will need to be disconnected at one end as well. The full size Lincoln model may not require this procedure at all. If you have some aftermarket type of exhaust pipe or any other non factory parts etc. interfering, you will need to disconnect these parts. Another thought to possibly consider is that a badly deteriorated motor mount could be lowering the engine and causing some interference. Removing the solenoid from the starter prior to removing the assembly is not advised.

Sincerely,

Bill

October 14, 2016

1977 Town Car Headlight Door Issues

Bill,

Saw your response to another post about similar problem they had with a Mark V. The 77 Town Car I have is in Hawaii and no local mechanic seems to be able or want to find that vacuum leak. What's happened so far is when I got the car a few years ago, the leak was such that doors stayed shut for about 3 days before starting to gradually open. Both would open at the same time and at the same rate. The problem got gradually worse. Upon investigating this, somebody suggested trying to change check valve near fire wall. Did this. No change. Also changed headlight switch as that too was suggested as possible culprit. So car had to go into shop for over a year to get engine changed. When I got car back, doors were worse. Driver side door slow to open and close even when engine on. Passenger side opens and closes quickly like before. But now will fully open if car left parked for even a few minutes. I got a shop to look at it and even got them the large ford pamphlet/ book on the vacuum / electrical system. Unfortunately they are not patient to try to really get to the root of the problem. They just want me to obtain two new door actuators which are hard to find. Oh in addition I disconnected air line to driver side actuator to check hose connection and a significant amount of water came out. So probably the driver side actuator is bad, but not positive on passenger side one. Do you agree actuators are likely cause or how water could get inside driver's side actuator? Can you suggest parts to tell them to check and if you have these parts you could sell or direct me to where I could find them?

Thanks,

Robert

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Hello Robert -

Several blog replies have been posted here regarding vacuum leaks and they all have similar information. Vacuum leaks can be located anywhere that the vacuum is routed and the total amount of loss will be the sum of all of the leaks that are found. We only recommend performing proper diagnosis to repair these systems. Without diagnosing you can consider every component that is shown in your shop manual a suspect. The vacuum motors (actuators) can very easily be tested for leaks and determined absolutely without doubt if they are leaking or not but unfortunately you have described the technicians that work on your car as impatient which is incompetence in my opinion. To sum up, I can sit here and type out ALL of the other parts that you have not "tried out" as culprits but that would be only guessing and a disservice to you.

We usually do stock most of the parts needed to repair these vacuum systems. Some components can also be successfully repaired in our shop.

The one possible way that water can be inside the lines etc. is that a sizable vacuum leak or leaks has the outside air entering the components and is condensing on the walls of the interior where the vacuum is routed. This of course is only a theory.

Although the headlamp door actuators are very popular leak areas I do hope that someone will diagnose and qualify them as faulty before you order replacement parts. As our customer we can offer to properly test any parts for you that are sent to us if you are unable to receive that service where you are located. Please check with George before sending us any parts for inspection.

Sincerely,

Bill

October 12, 2016

1963 Continental Acceleration Problems

Hi Bill,

I have a 1963 Lincoln Continental and having some acceleration problems. All started when my mechanical fuel pump died and installed an electric Carter pump, still no good. Then my mechanic thought my original carb was the problem (old and tired), so I installed an Edelbrock 750 with electric choke. Still ran the same, very sluggish and a hesitation during acceleration and an occasional backfire under load. Then thought it might ignition, so removed the points to a Crane points conversion kit. Then finally installed a MSD pro billet with vacuum advance. In the meantime I upgraded the battery cables, spark plug leads, coil and starter motor cable. The car is still doing it.

What can I look at next as I am running out of patience. Your help will be grateful.

Regards,

Angelo

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Hi Angelo -

I am not sure of the performance and/or quality of the aftermarket parts that you have installed but if you and your mechanic are confident that the fuel and ignition are more than sufficient, please have your mechanic carefully read the enclosed blog question and reply from the Lincoln Land Blog of January 2013. Does this information sound like your issue? Let us know the results.
Sincerely,

Bill

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January 21, 2013

1965 Continental Is Sluggish

Hi Bill,

I have been working on a customers 65 Continental for a couple of months now. He brought it to me saying it shut off on him one day and when he started it back up it was running rough and had little power. I have have been through this thing in and out, top and bottom. Did all the usual diagnosis stuff and have changed parts as I have found defects. The car was running rough at idle and would break up real bad when trying to accelerate, popping back back through the carburetor and smelling very rich. The first thing I did was rebuild the distributor, it wasn't advancing and the plate was very corroded. That didn't help at all. I pulled the timing cover to check the chain and marks and that was fine so I pulled the intake and discovered the lifters were seizing in the bores. I cleaned the bores, installed a new camshaft, lifters and timing chain set. While I had it that far down I sent the heads to the machine shop and 500 bucks later they were fixed with a few valves and all new springs. All the rockers are free and pushrods not bent. After all that the car idles as smooth as a brand new car, but still have no power and can barely accelerate. New coil, 12 volts to the coil, new cap and rotor, timing set at 10 degrees ( have tried it from 6 to 16 degrees), 5-6psi fuel pressure at the carb, new helper fuel pump near the tank, compression is 130-140 on every cylinder after warm-up. After all this the car still has very little power, breaks up during acceleration and is still slightly popping through the carburetor at WOT. You can see a mist of fuel with a flashlight coming out of the top of the carb while power breaking it at half throttle. I've hit a brick wall with this one, its the first 430 Ive ever worked on, I'm too far in it to stop now. Any ideas or advice? Thanks so much.

Andy

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Greetings Andy -

After reviewing your letter several times and reading what you have done so far with this engine and assuming that all of your work has been done correctly as per the engine's specifications etc. I can offer the following. The factory exhaust systems on these engines use a " double wall" exhaust pipe. These of course are the pipes that bolt up to the exhaust manifolds and continue on to the next flange connection rearward. It is not unheard of for the inner pipe to develop a separation in such a way as to severely seal up the exhaust on one side enough to cause the symptoms that you are describing. When this occurs the outer wall remains intact and no exhaust leak is heard. Because of the exhaust heat factor this final "plug up" can take place in a very short period of time as your customer has described to you. If the vehicle has the original style pipes on it you should remove them for a careful internal inspection.

Two other items to be aware of when tuning or servicing this era of engine are...The damper pulley on the crankshaft can separate from the rubber damper material and give you an incorrect timing reading. These are available rebuilt. The second is that the vacuum advance units on the distributor are well known to seize or rupture and become inoperative. These are available new.

I hope that the above helps you and I would ask you to let us know here at Lincoln Land what you find.

Sincerely,

Bill

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January 30, 2013

1965 Continental Is Sluggish - Update

Bill I can't thank you enough for the advice, I unbolted the exhaust just before the muffler's and sure enough the passenger side exhaust pipe was clogged shut. I ran 2 new pipes from the manifolds to the mufflers and the car runs perfect!! I've run into double walled exhaust pipe problems before but 99% of those cases were on Honda's. I had no idea these Lincolns were manufactured with it and probably never would have checked it.

Thanks again,

Andy.


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Hi Bill,

Thank you for your advice, being way over here in Australia it is a bit hard to find anyone with any experience at all with these cars. They have their querks and I guess that's part of the reason we love them! I think your blog from Jan 2013 is quite interesting in relation to my car. I had the exhaust built new but(there's always a but) the exhaust guy couldn't undo the bolts on the end of the headers and was worried about snapping them of if he applied too much force, so he left about 3 foot of original pipe and then welded a flange and continued with new pipe. So my problem could may aswell lie there.

Can I also ask, he recommended only using two mufflers before the diff so that they would run hotter and wont collect any water in them due to the fact that as we don't use these cars all too often enough, and thus avoid any rusting away in the muffler.

I forgot to mention last time that the car ran beautiful at idle and cruising at slow speeds runs great, and on the open freeway at about 60 mile/hr runs even better(there's not enough road ha ha) its just that acceleration problem I cant handle. I tell you that I wont rest til I fix that gremlin in there. Cheers again Bill.

Regards,

Angelo

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Angelo -

Everyone has their own opinion and there is plenty to read on the internet regarding exhaust systems. I personally only go with all of the original components on my systems because I enjoy the "Lincoln Quietness" of the factory installations. The available quality (and of course more costly) stainless steel components that are available do not rust out. Be advised however that the cheaper stainless exhaust parts are usually NOT of the optimum quality in all respects. In the end it is up to you according to your wants, needs and affordability. We wish you luck in diagnosing your recent engine issues.

Sincerely,

Bill

October 4, 2016

1970 Continental Starting Issues

Bill -

My 1970 Lincoln Town Car ("Ivy") with 58K miles has problems starting. My mechanic put in a new battery and rebuilt the starter. The car starts well, but when you shut it off after it's been running for 5-10 min, it doesn't always start again; it cranks and cranks. It needs to sit for about 10 min, and then it will start. The mechanic said it needs to cool down, but he can't pinpoint what's causing this malfunction. Any advice?

Thanks,

Tom

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Hi Tom -

After reading your problem description without knowing any tune up maintenance history on your 1970 Lincoln there are a few items that come to mind. The basic tune up components must be in good shape and properly adjusted exactly as required per the shop manual by a technician who is very familiar with this era of ignition systems. These tune up components are of course the engine ignition timing, ignition points and condenser, distributor cap and rotor, high tension wiring and spark plugs etc. After running a cold engine for ten minutes the carburetor choke MUST be moving to the wide open position as the engine warms up and the carburetor should not be flooding the intake manifold with any fuel after engine shut down. A hot flooded engine will most certainly not start easily until that excess fuel is allowed to evaporate somewhat. An engine that has been fuel flooding could also have blackened spark plugs causing a further poor spark condition. If the carburetor is NOT flooding the intake manifold after turning the engine off and you have no record of the tune up history as mentioned above I would have a tune up performed asap to assure that the engine is receiving a strong spark at the spark plugs. No engine that is in good tune "needs to cool down" in order to re start unless it has a serious cooling system failure and has been operated while overheated. Show the above to your mechanic and let us know the outcome. If all of the above is in good order and you still have starting issues let us know and we will proceed further.

Sincerely,

Bill

October 11, 2012

65 Slips Out Of Park, Hard To Start

Bill -

I have a 1965 Lincoln Continental all original single owner car with low miles on it. My wives Grandfather bought the car new. The car has sat for years and I am having a problem with something I was hoping you may be able to help me with. Baby Blue keeps slipping out of Park. I have trouble making the connection to even start her as well. Often times when I get the shifter into park it slips out back into reverse. I checked the linkage at the transmission and up at the steering box. It all looks tight and good. The transmission appears to be working perfectly when it drives. I was told by a local mechanic that it was something in the steering column. Do you have any idea what part it might be in the column? It looks like quite a job to pull the column so I am just trying to figure it out before I tear into it.

Thanks,

Jimmy

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Greetings Jimmy,

It is nice to hear that you are keeping that nice 65 Lincoln in the family. If all of the linkage appears to be in good working order and in correct adjustment the steering column is indeed the next area to examine. The lower steering column bushing is a very common failure on these vehicles and if worn out should be replaced as soon as possible in the interest of safety. We have heard of many instances from our customers of these cars slipping into reverse while idling and causing damage. I would advise you to contact Chris or George here at Lincoln Land as we have this bushing as well as the upper steering column bearing available. The parts are not too expensive and we will also be able to provide you with disassembly info. if you do not have the necessary Shop Manual. I hope this helps you get started as I would suggest that you consider this repair a priority.

Sincerely,

Bill

October 8, 2012

1969 Mark III New Owner Questions

Hi Bill,

Just bought my first Ford: a 1969 maroon Mark iii with 36k original miles. Car had been sitting a while and still had the original wires cap and rotor on it so I gave it a complete tune up. Runs almost perfectly with great power and smooth idle. However the idle smells a bit rich. Is there an idle mixture adjustment screw on the carb? I see one big and one small screw in the front but didn't want to touch anything without knowing what they did.

Lastly the passenger side window is ever so slightly misaligned versus the back 1/4 glass window. Is there a way to adjust this?

Thanks,

Adam

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Hi Adam -

Your 69 Mark III is a great car to own. The carburetors on these cars certainly are adjustable and there are several adjustments as well as idle mixture adjustments. If you are unfamiliar with carburetors as you indicate you will need the shop manual to review the operation and settings for your carburetor. If your engine has the original style carburetor installed on it this service manual will guide you through the various adjustments and probably save you much time and money as well.

The side windows also have many adjustments to change the up stops, fore and aft movement as well as angles of operation etc. One other common window problem with vehicles of that era is that the glass can become detached from the regulator parts and may cause an alignment issue that only "appears" to be an adjustment correction but is in fact a glass that has separated and is now out of position. Accurate diagnosis for this alignment condition is therefore very important. Again, the shop manual would be a must for you in order to properly review and perform all of the many possible window adjustments.

If you do not have the manual or would prefer only copies of these sections from the manual on these two issues please contact George or Chris at our office and we can arrange to send them to you. The complete Shop Manual is strongly recommended though in order to address these and future problems that you may encounter.

Sincerely,

Bill

October 4, 2012

1977 Lincoln Dies While Driving

I am having the same problem where I can go about 15 miles and the car dies. I have been recently told that it was a manufacturing problem or a design problem where is the fuel line is too close to to the engine, which causes it to vapor lock. I have been instructed to put a brass t fitting on the fuel line coming out of the fuel pump and another T fitting to the fuel line going into the fuel tank and then running a new line from the back to the front connecting the to t fittings. I have not done this yet it seems that one should be able to move the fuel line away from the engine under the hood instead of running such a long line from back to front.

I also just noticed a little rubber hose nipple coming on of the rear wheel well appearing to come from the gas tank filler neck not sure what it is or what its function is.

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There is no factory design or defect on a 77 Lincoln that promotes fuel system Vapor Lock. I have no idea what is causing your problem as you describe but if you believe it to be fuel related you need to put the fuel system back to the original factory state and then perform the proper fuel delivery tests as shown in the shop manual. An engine that "dies" or shuts off after 15 miles can do so because of one of several conditions or faults so therefore there is no room for guessing. If anyone thinks that it is a fuel issue you need to "prove it" first with a proper diagnosis in order to repair it. We hope this helps.

Sincerely,

Bill

1970 Mark III Seat And Horn Issues

Hi Bill-

The power seat and horn went dead on my 70 mark III earlier this wk. Then the new battery went dead. Now when I jump start it, the horn wont shut off (even after the motor turns over and car starts).

Any ideas would be most appreciated!

Thanks,

Tom

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Tom -

The best way to diagnose a horn that is on at all times is to unplug the wiring harness that runs up the steering column to the horn switch and the turn signal switch. The most common cause of this condition is a sticking or faulty horn switch and your car probably does have the "rim blow" steering wheel switch. If the horn stops blowing with that wiring unplugged this will tell you that you have a problem in the steering column or switch. If not, you will need to trace the horn circuit with the use of the correct wiring diagram. Having a dead battery experience will not cause the horn circuit to become faulty but inadvertently crossing wires etc. in the horn circuit during any other electrical repairs however will very likely cause a problem. I hope that the above helps you to a speedy diagnosis.

Sincerely,

Bill

1994 Town Car Air Suspension Questions

HI BILL-

MY OTHER LINCOLN, A 94 TOWN CAR SEDAN WAS RECENTLY REFIT WITH NEW REAR AIR SHOCKS. I PUT LIMO GRADE AIR SHOCKS ON IT THIS TIME, AND AFTER 6 WEEKS WITH NO PROBLEM, THE CAR WONT KEEP THE CORRECT HEIGHT LEVEL IN THE REAR.

THE MECHANIC SAYS THE PISTONS ON THE SHOCKS WORK FINE, BUT THEY WONT STAY UP. I CALLED A VENDOR AND HE SAID TO CHECK THE SOLENOIDS, AND AIRLINE, BUT THE MECHANIC THINKS IT COULD BE THE LEVELING SWITCH OR CONTROL MODULE.

ANY IDEAS?

THANKS VERY MUCH!

-TOM

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Hi Tom -

The 94 Town Cars were equipped with rear Air Springs. Do you now have air shocks on your rear suspension or air springs. This is confusing to us if you have both installed. In any case there is an adjustable sensor in the rear that senses the vehicle height and instructs the electronic suspension module to make the necessary height corrections via solenoids and air lines. This sensor may have become loose or may be faulty etc. I would start by inspecting that sensor as it is easy to check. I have no idea if the installation of "limo grade" items would cause any issues as we have never seen the need to alter the original factory equipped parts with Limo parts. We do offer a "Heavy Duty" grade bag here at Lincoln Land, if this is what your supplier is referring to as "Limo", again this should present no issues. If the original electronics on your suspension system have not been altered I do hope that you discover only a loose sensor as outlined above. To perform any further diagnosis you will need the Shop Manual and or a shop with a technician who is familiar with this suspension.

Sincerely,

Bill

September 17, 2012

1961 Starting Issues

Good Morning Bill,

I have a new issue that I am hoping to you help me solve.

While bumping the starter in short bursts in the effort to un-seize the engine; my son left the ignition switch in the "On position" for two days.

Now, a red generator light appears on the dash broad and the starter won't engage/turn. All it does is make a single clicking sound when I turn the key.

Any suggestions?

Gary

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Gary -

From the description of your problem we would first strongly suspect that the battery has lost its charge. If the ignition key was left on for two days as you have indicated a battery will be powering up the ignition system and the generator light etc. during that time period. Therefore the condition and state of charge of the battery are the first things for you to examine. Leaving the key on can be detrimental to some parts of the ignition system as well. The life of these parts may have been shortened. Time will tell.

Sincerely,

Bill

September 10, 2012

'71 Mark III Dieseling At Shut Off

Bill -

I recently purchased a Mark III, it is in excellent condition, very original and I'm having just one problem. Very shortly after purchasing the vehicle it started to run after shutoff very rough. It makes knocking sounds and shortly after finally shuts off. It does not do this every time. Sometimes upon start up I can faintly hear it as it starts for only literally less than a second. At shut off when said problem presents itself I have seen smoke leaving the air intake tube located by battery. I only use 93 octane gas. I have no previous knowledge of the cars service history. It has 66K miles. Very clean engine bay. What could cause this dieseling?? Otherwise the engine runs great with good power. Please help.

John

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John -

Hi John -

Congratulations on your 71 MK III purchase. They are great cars. The most common cause of dieseling at engine shutoff is too fast of an engine idle speed when the engine should be at its normal slow idle speed after the engine is at operating temperature. If this is the case with your engine and the problem started to appear on its own, the carburetor choke system and throttle mechanism should be inspected for a sticking condition. As you probably already know a cold engine will start and run initially on a fast idle and as it warms up the choke circuit will cause the fast idle cam to release the setting to the slower idle. If that or a sticking throttle shaft etc. is holding the engine at an abnormal higher idle after warm up the engine can "run on" or "diesel" after engine shut off. The above is the easiest and best way to first approach this problem. Knowing how the carburetor systems operate will be required and the complete carburetor operation is explained in the Shop Manual.

Sincerely,

Bill

September 5, 2012

1969 Mark Fuel Pump Issues - Update from May 2012...

Hello Bill & Chris,

On May 29 2012 you will see my email to you guys. I had to walk away in disgust at that time and left the Mark sitting in the garage. Since the motor rebuild no I mean entire car rebuild it will not run properly because of lack of fuel to the carb. I replaced the fuel pump 3 times with a new Airtex 6878 fuel pump. The car will sometimes run, sometimes start but eventually quit running after 15-30 minutes. Everything is new and I mean everything, it is cooling properly, it runs great when it runs. I removed the fuel line to the pump from the tank. I attached a hose to the fuel pump and dropped it into a gallon of gas under the car. I detached the fuel line at the filter on the carb and stuck it in a jar. Cranking for minutes on the starter yielded a tablespoon of gas in the jar. My motor mechanic was convinced it was the eccentric. After months of hesitation I called him and we have torn down the front of the motor. The eccentric he installed, thinking it was better was the 2 piece Ford eccentric. I will say it has play in it. Is there to be a washer
behind these two cam rings??? I have no idea. My 69 Technical Data manual for the Mark III shows a one piece eccentric. IS THIS MY PROBLEM my car requires the 1 piece cam??? Or the fact there is suppose to be a washer behind the 2 piece cam?? Now it gets more interesting, NO AGGRAVATING to the point of profanity ! My George said to throw away the Airtex fuel pumps, it's garbage made in Mexico. Go buy a Carter. I have
searched for a Carter fuel pump. When I find one it says Carter M6878, fits 1970-71 Mark III, NOT compatible with 1969. It there a difference in fuel pumps for 69s ?? I called Robert Ballard in Orlando and he said he knew the timing covers were different between the years of 69 and 70 and maybe the fuel pump was positioned differently on the timing cover not allowing the arm on the newer aftermarket pumps to come in proper contact
with the cam. Mac said on his Marks he never had a problem. I'm sicken with not knowing what the problem is. We have the 3 Lincolns and I'm mechanically capable. I have NEVER had such an ordeal with fuel delivery as I have had on this car. At this point with all the time, effort, and expense I really wanted to keep it original as Ford built it, that's just my nature.

Lord HELP !

Patrick in east Texas.

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Hi Patrick -

Your email regarding this problem earlier this year is still remembered by us and I had hoped that it would have been resolved by now. After reading your recent email several times though I don't completely understand your test. You state that you removed the fuel line from the tank. Does that mean that you drew the gas for this test through the fuel lines to the pump at the tank area or did you draw from a short temporary hose properly installed near the fuel pump itself thereby bypassing the fuel lines and hoses from the pump to the tank? If you drew fuel for the test near the pump and then cranked the engine a properly activated pump would have drawn ample fuel and delivered it to the carburetor via the outlet lines and through the fuel filter. Performing that test near the pump eliminates the possibility of a plugged line or an air leak in the suction system between the pump and the fuel pickup in the tank. If the test was performed in this fashion and the pump still did NOT deliver fuel I can only surmise from where I sit that the pump is faulty or that the pump rod is not being activated correctly by the original design at its location in the engine. I can tell you honestly that the fuel delivery design on these engines has never been a problem area and that any fuel delivery failures have always been easy to diagnose in my opinion. I believe that your tests are possibly not being done exactly correct or something obvious is being overlooked somewhere. We cannot determine from here if your fuel pump cam eccentric is activating as designed or if anything has been incorrectly altered in this area on your engine. I am sure of and trust that you or your mechanic already has the correct manuals etc. with explicit photos of the various workings and installation components of the camshaft and the fuel pump. We can offer to test one of the so called "garbage" new pumps for you or we can supply you with a new pump that we are having 100% success and zero complaints with. Beyond that we would need to be on site with the car to do the diagnosis. Let us know how you would like us to proceed in order to help you further.

Sincerely,

Bill

August 8, 2012

1966 AC Concerns

Hi Bill -

The A/C on one of my Lincolns is acting up! It's a 1966 with "select-aire". The compressor doesn't turn on. The blower operates just fine, all the vacuum control doors work as they should, but no cold air. If I run a hot jumper wire to the pigtail to the compressor, it kicks on and I have ice cold air! Any thoughts on "what usually goes wrong"? I really don't want to wire in a toggle switch, so any ideas, advice, etc. would be greatly appreciated.

Thanks,

Gary

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Hi Gary -

That should be an easy diagnosis for you or your mechanic. The compressor circuit needs to be tested for power from the main a/c Switch ( with the key on and the sw. in the a/c position) through to the Thermostatic De-icing Switch and from there to the compressor Clutch. A good place to start is with a 12v test light at the de-icing sw. which should be already closed and sending power to the clutch at ambient temperature above approximately 35 degrees. The wiring schematic for the power path and operation is shown in your Shop manual. If any parts prove to be faulty, we should be able to supply replacements for you. Good luck.

Sincerely,

Bill

July 19, 2012

1978 Mark Blowing White Smoke

Hey Bill,

You answered a previous question for me and I was hoping you could help me out again. I have a 78 Lincoln Continental Mark V (the diamond jubilee edition) with the 7.5L 460, and I am having an issue where the car is blowing white smoke. I know that most people would assume head gasket, but when I checked the oil everything looked fine. Also, its very odd because when I start the car up I can leave it running in park for a very long time and there is no smoke present. I step on the accelerator while in park and no smoke either. When I put the car into drive and start driving there is no smoke, but once I step on the brakes and the car comes to a stop, pillows of white smoke are emitted from under the car around the front wheel on the driver side. The car is garage kept and there is nothing leaking on the concrete. When I looked underneath I did notice that there is an exhaust leak around the catalytic converter and/or the flange exhaust pipe and I was wondering could this be the cause. I keep hearing that white smoke is a sign of coolant, but someone else said that since there is a leak that there can be condensation in the pipe and once the car is driving that its causing it to steam and blow out from the leak. Any help would be very much appreciated. Thanks again.

Jimmy

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Hello Jimmy -

From your description and symptoms it is clear to me that someone would need to be there with the vehicle to find out exactly where the white smoke is originating from. We cannot determine from here if it is actualy billowing from the left front wheel and brakes or from under the car somewhere. We would need to road test your car and then drive it to a safe area when it smokes to open the hood in order to pinpoint the problem. A good mechanic should have no problem finding the exact cause with no guessing.

Sincerely,

Bill

July 17, 2012

1988 Town Car AC Issues

Bill,

I'm hoping for some advice, maybe this is a vac leak I am overlooking, or something else. I am trying to gather information before getting deep into this car, dash pulled to get to the heater box, etc.

OK.

It's a 1988 TC.

Issue is, switching from VENT to Floor, HI-LO, or Defrost, only 25% or so of the air is directed from the vent to either the floor or the windscreen. The other 75% of the air still flows through the normal vents.

The thermostat works fine. Cold air, hot air when I want it. A/C works fine.

It seemed to me to be a vac leak. However, there does not appear to be a vac leak.

Another person's opinion is that it could be a twig in the heater box, or some sort of other debris. He is recommending taking the dash apart more to explore further....

I'm still thinking it's a vac leak, since it is directing some air to the windscreen when I want it, and some to the floor when I want it.

Anything come to mind?

Thanks,

Richard

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Hi Richard -

The ac/heat control system on your 88 town car is vacuum controlled as you know and is designed to default towards Defrost in the event of loss of vacuum. If you have 75% of the air flowing out of the a/c Vent ducts when no air should flow from these dash vents then I would advise you to first inspect the vacuum lines for correct routing and attachments to the correct vacuum motors under the dash. At this time the individual vacuum motor operation and their attachments can be inspected as well. If you have recently purchased the car or do not know the repair history, there may be many other possibilities such as previously misassembled components etc. but the above is easy to do from under the dash without removing the heater plenum assembly. To diagnose the system properly though I strongly advise to do so with the correct Shop manual or A/C manual at your side. If the above does not help please contact us for further advise. We can of course also arrange a shop manual or any necessary parts to be shipped to your address.

Sincerely,

Bill

1969 Continental General Questions

Bill -

I was lucky enough to find this car in great condition, running, with only a small amount of things to fix. I bought the 5 volume 1,500 page shop manual, I'm waiting on the original owners manual, and an "original shop manual additional book with the vacuum line diagrams". I'm also waiting on a "1969 car preliminary shop manual" I'm not a mechanic, but I've always performed my own regular maintenance and installed my stereo systems, alarms etc. I cannot even find the fuse box on this car & I don't want to damage any of the original interior trying to find it. This car has been sitting since 2005 and was not prepped for storage. Although it does start & run I'm going to do the following: change oil &filter, new air filter, new fuel filter(drain tank & blow out the main fuel line if needed), flush radiator, new failsafe thermostat & gasket, install a gauge cluster(oil pressure, water temp, volts), have the transmission flushed, new shocks(front & rear), new 850cca battery, new tires, lube & new gasket/seal for the rear differential gear, new break pads(drum & disc), flush brake lines/new brake fluid, install a new pertronix electronic ignition3 & flamethrower3 coil, eventually plan to put a new carburetor on, and have the complete AC system replaced.

The spark plugs, wires & distributor cap all look brand new. The c6 transmission had a complete rebuild in 2000, rebuilt carb(at Holly), new steering gear box in 2005, new master cylinder, new water pump, new intake in 1999.

I haven't driven it since I bought it, and don't plan to until I get a few more things checked off my list. If you have any additional manuals or diagrams available that I need, I'm willing to purchase them. My goal is to restore this car the right way and not mess anything up along the way. After finding your forum online and reading your posts, you are definitely the right knowledgeable guy to seek advice from. Any advice, tips, or general knowledge you can pass along would be greatly appreciated. Thank you in advance Bill...!

Sincerely,

Ben

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Hi Ben -

Congratulations on your recent 69 Lincoln purchase. They are really a good choice for a well built quality car. The fuse box is located to the right of and configured to the same padded shape as the glovebox. It unsnaps from the top and pivots open on a hinge (piano hinge) as does the glove box. If you have any specific questions regarding any other areas please contact us. If you would like to purchase other information please call and ask for George and he will advise you what we have available.

Sincerely,

Bill

July 12, 2012

1969 Mark AC Issues

Hi Bill,

I am seeking consultation once again from you wealth of knowledge. I've also attached a picture to help describe what I "think" is the issue.

I recently repaired an AC leak which happened to be the large nut on top of the compressor that holds the suction manifold to compressor body. Leak Fixed. I pulled a vacuum on the system for 30 minutes and it held for 15 minutes so I went ahead and charged the system. I put 2-12 ounce cans of R-12 in and with the system set on MAX (ATC lever at HIGH and temp lever at 65) and a thermometer in the register, it was blowing at 40 degrees F. AWESOME!!!
So I shut everything down and put my equipment away. About 10 minutes later I started it up and it was still Ice cold, however after driving it less than a mile it started to get warmer and the air temperature held at a steady 60 degrees.
I figured it was low on charge as the shop manual states the system charge at 3 pounds, 3-12 ounce cans should be just under that requirement. I started with two cans as I didn't want to overfill, but went ahead and put a third can in with no change in temperature.

My initial thoughts were temp door control servo but then realized it was cold with two cans initially and how can it change so quickly? So I decided to take a peek under the hood and saw the expansion valve (evaporator side) is caked in ice and the hose side is just cold. Does this indicate some sort of obstruction in the valve? I imagine it shouldn't get that built up?
I should also mention that there is a lot of hot air running through the HVAC system even with it off... I'll get sudden burst of hot air on my legs when driving once the car is warmed up. What would cause this?

Sorry for the lengthy e-mail but I appreciate any help you can give!


Dan

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Hi Dan -

From the looks of your photo It would appear to me that the expansion valve is indeed shutting down or that your de-icing switch is not cycling as required. To diagnose properly, a knowledgeable a/c technician will attach proper gauges on the High and Low side valves of the system in order to pin the problem down. The de-icing switch will cycle the compressor to avoid "icing up" the evaporator. The cycling times will vary in response to the blower speed and the ambient temperature as the sw. will act as necessary to avoid icing the evaporator. Another item that may contribute to poor cooling and incorrect system pressures can be a plugged Receiver/ Dryer unit. This dryer contains a filter which can plug up or partially plug up. A new expansion valve and receiver/dryer combination repair is not uncommon.

As for the hot air entering the car with the system turned off experience tells me that it can be mainly due to seals and air valves that are made of foam or rubber that have crumbled due to age. I also remember though that we had some complaints regarding warm air entering some vehicles on hot days with the a/c off even when the cars were new. The only way to avoid this may be to use all available ventilation features of the car or use the a/c if it is functional. It seems that the vehicles built with Automatic Climate Control were meant to be used continuously as designed.

So Dan, it would seem that accurate diagnosis is the key for your refrigeration issue. If the expansion valve proves to be the culprit I would recommend replacing the receiver dryer as well as a measure of good practice. If you do need any further advice or any repair parts please do not hesitate to call on us.

Sincerely,

Bill

1997 Town Car Air Ride Issues

Hi Bill -

I'm reaching out once again to Lincoln Land since I had so much luck with getting a new intake manifold from you guys in the past. Hoping you can help with the always present air suspension problems. The "check suspension" dash light on my 1997 Town Car (70,000) is on. I've been conversing with Lincolns On Line but wondering if you can offer an opinion as back up?. The car has been to two different dealers. First said I needed a new control module at a cost of $500 (parts/labor). Second dealer said module was ok but that I needed a new height sensor (same replacement cost of $500). Seems all the dealers know is getting customers to part with a minimum of $500. I paid my diagnostic fee at both dealers and left.

So, I've installed "salvage" control modules and height sensors myself since they don't require tools and take only seconds/minutes to do. The donor vehicles were checked to make sure their air shocks were holding air before removing. I've checked all fuses, relays, door courtesy lights, compressor, and shut off switch in trunk (to make sure its on). Everything seem to be working when being tested. Second dealer connected to the test port in the trunk to diagnose. They said the only problem the diagnose test brought up was an intermittent code 68 (the height sensor) however, they still kept getting a intermittent clear on the test device but not clearing on the dash warning light. Have installed two different salvage height sensors. These are so simple I don't know how they could go bad without corrosion. The original height sensor in my car (from new) was cleaner than most 3 year old cars (its 14 years old). I live on the west coast so the weather is very mild....salt air can be a problem with surface corrosion (the rear axle shows this) but my car is kept extremely clean (top/bottom and inside) all the time.

Don't know what I'm missing. Don't know if you are familiar with Dereck at Lincolns On Line but he also helped me with an A/C problem involving the bad soldering points on my EATC unit. This was after 3 different mechanics charged me $1K for diagnostics/repairs I didn't need and still didn't have working A/C! Turned out to be the simple solder connection! Anyway, I'm grasping for help from everyone. I have health issues so I'm limited on sight/strength but want to try and fix as much by myself as possible.

Are there any well know quirks that I'm missing here by chance? With all the major components and fuse/relays checked and no visible damaged wiring I don't know where to go.

Thanks so much for any help!

Sincerely,

Bob

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Hello Bob -

These electronically controlled devices are sure nice to have and most of them work real well for years but as time goes by and the vehicles go out of warranty and newer models appear the chances of an easy inexpensive repair to them evaporates.

As far as your issue is concerned, you seemed to have replaced the major items (some of them twice) as suggested by some of the mechanics. You do not state if the "check suspension" light is on at all times or if the system works sometime or if it ever worked for you. In any case because of the nature of your experience we at Lincoln Land would need to approach the problem by trying to pull the diagnostic codes as per the Shop Manual as you indicate has already been done in your location. Experience in repairing this system is a real plus for an accurate diagnosis. The technician that works on it now after your ordeal with the problem should keep in mind that a certain Code may not mean that the indicated coded part is faulty but that a bad connection on an electrical pin within a multi connector that services the coded part may be the culprit here. Intermittent electrical connections at ANY critical point could possibly trigger the warning light to illuminate. An issue such as you describe can be a real challenge to the best of mechanics. I hope that the above information helps to lead you or your technician to the correct and final repair for your problem.

Sincerely,

Bill

June 18, 2012

1965 Is Running Rough

Hi Bill,

I just picked up a '65 Continental and it's been running great! I changed all the fluids when I bought the car.

The other morning I went to start the car and it started, but immediately ran very rough. It sounds /feels like its running on 7 cylinders. I've verified that spark is there, but I'm new to his car and the 430 so I'm not sure what to look at next. Any suggestions?

I can tell you anything else you want to know about what's going on but need some direction.

I'm quickly becoming a HUGE fan of the site!

Thanks,

Chris

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Hi Chris -

If you have only recently bought the car and it has developed a miss on one cylinder ONLY, you should isolate that cylinder and do a compression test on that cylinder. These engines are known to bend pushrods if they have been sitting unused for a period of time and if they are running with old fuel. If that is the case the bent push rods can be replaced but if the issue continues to repeat, a valve job may be needed later. If the rough running is NOT confined to only one cylinder and after doing a thorough under hood inspection for disconnected ignition components and vacuum hoses etc. you may need to do a complete engine tune up. If you have no knowledge of any previous engine tune up or maintenance a general tune up is a good idea in any case. You should begin though by starting the engine cold and verifying that the carburetor choke is dechoking as the engine warms up. If the choke is not retracting as it should, the engine will receive too rich a fuel mixture as it warms up and will run very rough and the spark plugs can become carbon fouled. A shop manual is strongly recommended if you are going to be servicing and maintaining your Lincoln yourself. I hope that the above helps get you on the path to a speedy diagnosis.

As you can see from the above, your rough engine can be caused by any one of several problems therefore it makes good sense to check the easier to repair items first such as the choke and tune up suggestions. If you need any further advice or any repair parts please contact us at any time.

Sincerely,

Bill

June 11, 2012

1966 Lincoln Brake Questions

Bill,

I have a 66 Lincoln I got from a field in Oregon. I am working on the brakes and when I press the pedal it stays down. I hear air when I push it but no spring back. Does it just need bled or is something busted. It was damp but not a lot of fluid in the master.had to put a new rubber hose kit on the calipers. Any ideas?

Anthony

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Hi Anthony -

Your 66 Lincoln has a great braking system. The front brakes are very ample four piston disc design while the rear are the large drum style. As far as the condition of the brakes on your car is concerned your first sentence "I got it from a field in Oregon" says it all. If you have no knowledge of any previous brake maintenance and the car has been sitting in a field for an unknown period of time the complete brake system should be disassembled, inspected and serviced as necessary. Many of the movable hydraulic parts along with their seals can be seized, leaking or failing. The disc pads, rear shoes, rotors and drums and all lines and hoses etc. will be included in this inspection. When the system is serviced properly and is brought up to par you will be happy to have very safe brakes. If you plan on driving the car safely this is the only way that we would advise anyone to approach the braking issues as you describe them.

Sincerely,

Bill

May 31, 2012

1967 Continental Vacuum Questions

Dear Bill,

I have read much of your page and enjoyed your insight, and respect your knowledge. I am doing a complete restoration on a 67 Continental 462, which is getting close to finish (thank God). My partner described issues of cold start issues which I assumed was a carb choke related issue. While I was pulling parts to paint and replacing severely dry rotted vacuum lines I noticed a few issues. First the choke was disconnected at the carb. Initially I thought problem solved. As I got further down I noticed near the front driver firewall under some electrical connections what looked like an airbag with a valve inside which was rotted throughout. As I tracked it down via vacuum line I noticed it ran to the choke. Can you please tell me what this part is and where I might find a replacement. Also I found a rusted throughout (assuming metal vacuum line) that ran from the passenger side exhaust manifold to the carb. It looks similar to a metal brake line flanged at the ends fitting into a bracket bolted into manifold. Any info is greatly appreciated and please continue posting, I enjoyed your answers.

Matt

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Hello Matt,

We are glad that you enjoy the blog. The chokes on these 462 engines work real well if all is intact and adjusted as per the manual. As well we should have the necessary parts to service them if any parts are needed. An electric choke shouldn't really be necessary here. Someone possibly could have connected some of your underhood components incorrectly. If you send us some clear pictures of the areas that you are concerned with, we may be able to identify them for you. Do you have a proper shop manual for your 67? The manual can be very helpful for you and pay off big time in several ways. After we receive your photos Al or George will contact you with information on what you might need.

Sincerely,

Bill

May 29, 2012

1969 Mark III Issues

Bill,

I have a dilemma. I just finished restoration of our beautiful 69 Mark III. Every aspect was NOS with many thanks going to Lincolnland. It was a 5 year process. It is prepped for concours show. Funny story now, it is complete and it will not run. After 100 miles on the new motor it would just stop running, it would restart if I poured fuel down the carb
repeatedly. In the next 100 miles this problem got worse. After the 3rd new fuel pump I knew something was up. The fuel pump eccentric is not functioning. I expect the flat key has sheared. I am so disgusted I lost sleep over it. I fear that tearing down the front end of the motor will lead to scratches bumps and bruises. Everything was detailed down to
individual washers and bolts. The troublesome power steering pump doesn't
leak a drop though it took 3 attempts to get it perfect. The agony of this!! I am considering adding a electric 12V fuel pump with 4-5psi and bypass the mechanical fuel. Would I be foolish doing this? My mechanic says I should go with the electric fuel pump. I think he is in fear of the $6000 paint job too and the exquiste detail on the engine. What would you and Chris do????????????

Patrick, cursing expletives in east Texas.

Bill,

Let me add here in east Texas I only have ethanol for fuel nothing else is available. I have been having vapor lock problems with all 4 Lincolns, the Thunderbird and my Studebaker. It is 90-110 degrees 6 months out of the year anymore. The heat build up under the hoods is tremendous and we have had to sit for hours waiting for the cool down so as to get the cars started again. This was another reason I thought maybe I should give in and put a elec.fuel pump on at least one car and see how it goes. I've always been a stickler for 100% original but maybe I need to give in. Your thoughts are valued !

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Hello Patrick -

I have read both your first and second emails to us and will consider both in the reply. Your question "what would Chris and you do" is a good one because if it did happen to one of our cars in Florida here we would certainly discuss the options. If your diagnosis is correct and the fuel pump eccentric has failed and become non operative for some unknown reason as you describe, Chris and I would be concerned as to what further problems a loose eccentric and its associated parts etc. could possibly cause to the front of the engine as you drive the car with an electric fuel pump installed. I think that I can truthfully say that these fuel pumps and actuator parts are not known to frequently fail when they are installed properly and torqued down correctly. I also realize that even the best assembled components can sometimes fail and surprise the best technicians.

You also indicate the frustrations that you are enduring with several vehicles due to the hot weather and your desire to try an electric fuel pump in order to find out if this would be a solution to the vapour lock issues. You and your mechanic are on location there in texas and he probably has experience with the modern inferior fuel problems that we are all experiencing with our older vehicles therefore I would say go ahead and try the electric fuel pump as an experiment but try to install it in a manner that would allow you to possibly remove it at a later date if you change your mind. I am also sure that your mechanic knows as we do here that the engine cooling system along with the cooling fan etc. must absolutely be in excellent operating condition for proper engine cooling in extreme ambient temperatures.

To sum up, if you and your mechanic are convinced that an electric fuel pump is the answer to the vapour lock in your location give it a try but we would be concerned what could develop later with the abandoned loose eccentric. Chris may have some further advice to add to this reply or he may send you a separate email. Good luck and please let us know what you decide to do.

Sincerely,

Bill

1966 Lincoln Coupe Brake Light Issues

Hello there Bill -

I just bought my 66 Lincoln Coupe 2 door. Been chasing a brake light issue. I checked the switch at the pedal it works. Then the relay under the hood seems to work when you push the pedal you hear the relay trip and it registers with a test light but in the trunk at the harness it does not register. The blinkers running lights all work fine though.

Any thought would be greatly appreciated.

DJ

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Hi DJ -

We have recently posted suggestions for solutions to other brake light problems on the blog for a 66 Lincoln. The posts basically advise how to follow the circuit from the brake switch and relay, through the turn signal switch and then out to the rear lights. Many owners do not realize that the brake light circuit involves the turn signal switch and this somewhat complex switch can fail in several ways. A wiring diagram therefore is a big plus in order to quickly diagnose this type of issue. You can easily link to these posts on our blog. Hope that this helps.

Sincerely,

Bill

May 22, 2012

New 1966 Owner has questions...

Hi Bill,

My name is Brendon and I have recently purchased my land yacht from Modesto California for $2500 and it runs like a champ. I live in Vegas so I had a question about my oil leaking. Is there a thicker oil or something I can add to make a quick fix instead of dropping the oil pan and putting a new gasket?

The second question is, I just replaced my battery because it wasn't giving me enough cranking amps but held 12 volts, all my windows and everything worked before I replaced it with a new battery but now with the new battery installed my windows are very sluggish and my alternator light is always on would you have an idea as to why that would happen? And my final question, I don't have the window bypass switch or a core is there a way to bypass it? Or do I just leave nothing in it?? To allow all my windows to work.

Thanks,

Brendon

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Hi Brendon -

Good to hear that you are enjoying your recently purchased 66 Lincoln. They are great cars.

You don't say exactly where your oil leak is or how bad it is but using thicker oil in an engine to slow an oil leak really makes no sense because if you thicken it somehow enough to alleviate some of the leak it will probably soon prove detrimental to the actual necessary lubrication that some internal engine parts require. Thickening oil to slow down an oil leak is therefore not recommended. What does make sense though is to have a real good look at where the oil is leaking in order to find out if you have more than one leaking issue. Some of these leaks may be easy and inexpensive to repair.

Your second question says that everything worked fine before you changed the battery and now some of your electrical is sluggish. With that information I can only conclude that you have installed another battery that is in poor condition or that necessary wires were not reinstalled during the repair or that the alternator or regulator was damaged. Because this appeared immediately after the battery was changed you will need to carefully back track and recheck the installation and the related wiring. Keep in mind that all of the original ground wires are also very important here. If nothing is found to be wrong, the battery and the charging system would then need to be properly tested with the correct equipment.

Eliminating the power widow lockout/bypass switch is possible but is not necessary because we should have this part available for you. For further advice on this switch please contact Al at our warehouse and he can advise you according to what you want to do with this switch.

Sincerely,

Bill

May 17, 2012

1965 Continental Shifting Issues

Hello Bill,

I have a 1965 Lincoln Continental that will not shift out of 1st gear while driving. I recently replaced the intake manifold gaskets due to a coolant leak. Before I did this, I didn't have any issues with the transmission. Now there is no coolant leak at the intake manifold, but I have checked for a vacuum leak and the gauge shows 13-14 inches of mercury at idle. The manual says that it should be 18 inches of mercury minimal.

I have a few questions. First, is there any way to any way to correct the vacuum leak at the manifold without taking it back off? Second, would a low vacuum cause the issue with the transmission not shifting into higher gears?

Thanks,

B. Tucker

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Benjamin -

It is difficult to answer your first question regarding the vacuum leak because you don't say where at the manifold the leak actually is. If the leak appeared only after you replaced the gaskets though I would say yes it would need to be removed and checked for a gasket out of place or the possibility that the wrong gaskets were supplied to you. If you rotated the distributor during the manifold gasket replacement the resultant incorrect ignition timing can affect the vacuum gauge reading. If a vacuum fitting on the manifold was damaged or not reinstalled etc. etc. that alone could be the only cause of your low vacuum reading. The transmission does require vacuum in order to shift properly and in fact has its own vacuum supply from a fitting at or near the intake area to a valve known as the "Modulator Valve" at the rt. rr. of the transmission. This possible lack of vacuum and the possibility of the transmission kick down rod from the carburetor linkage to the transmission linkage being out of adjustment or not reinstalled will result in poor transmission operation. To sum up, a simple vacuum disconnect may be your only problem so I would advise you to diagnose very carefully before deciding to pull the manifold again. Good luck with a simple fix.

Sincerely,

Bill

May 7, 2012

1966 Brake / Directional Light Issues

Dear Bill,

I am writing to you in concern to a 1966 Lincoln Continental that a friend of mine is having a problem with. The problem is the rear passenger-side brake/directional light is staying on all the time and brake light switch was replaced and the problem still exists.

The driver's side brake light/directional lights do not operate at all. I am asking you for insight so that this problem may be rectify.

Thank you,

Amado

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Amado -
The rear brake lights receive power to the left and right rear bulbs through separate wires (left and right) from the turn signal switch. When the brake sw. is activated power travels from the brake sw. to the turn signal switch and depending if the turn signal switch is engaged or not these wires to the brake lights may or may not both receive power for the rear brake lights. Your description of the rt. rr. brake light staying on seems to indicate a problem with the turn signal switch itself or the wiring to the switch. If all the rest of the cars wiring is intact etc. a good test for you will be to unplug the t.s. switch at the lower steering column and then observe if the rt. rr. brake light then goes off. If the light does go off and the wiring from the plug to the sw. is o/k a new switch may be needed. If the light remains on with the t.s. sw. unplugged the body wiring from the plug to the rt. rr. brake lights will need to be traced for a short etc. with the aid of the correct wiring diagram. The correct wiring diagram and good automotive elecrical knowledge may be necessary as this circuit on these 66's can be complicated. Some vehicles have appeared at Lincoln Land with more than one fault and this of course makes diagnoses even more complicated. Keep in mind that a "four way hazard" flasher circuit as well as a brake light relay may also be involved in this issue. The turn signal switches though are usually the culprits with the symptom that you are describing. Also, there are two styles of turn signal switches on a 66 Lincoln depending on whether the car has a fixed or a tilt steering wheel. The installation of the switch for the tilt wheel style may be adjustable and if so should be checked for proper adjustment and operation before condemning the sw. itself.
I hope that the above helps you to a quick diagnosis. In the event that you require repair parts we will have these available for the job.

Sincerely,

Bill

May 3, 2012

The Old Thunderbird Fuel Sender Blues

Dear Uncle Bill,

Carter here, again.

In addition to the 67 4-dr I acquired in Florida at Lincoln Land last year, a 68 2dr Landau has found me and a new home. Turning into a very nice care, however; I have replaced the gas tank, and the fuel sending unit. The fuel sending unit twice... why? Because the first one sent the gas gauge to a point way past "full" and I thought it defective.... So, I order another one, same result. Help!

Your favorite nephew,

Carter

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Hi Carter -

If the other dash gauges are reading correctly and the new sending units that you have installed are not internally faulty I would suspect that the vehicle plug to the sending unit is not compatible with the new unit. You need to carefully compare the electricals on the original sending unit with the new ones that you are trying to install. I believe that there is some problem with some senders that was causing exactly what you are describing. Contact us at Lincoln Land Carter as you may need to send us your original unit as well as the new unit so that we can test both and configure the wiring on the new one to operate correctly for your car. "We'll git er done."

Sincerely,

Bill

April 27, 2012

1967 Continental Coupe Possible Carb Issues

Hello Bill,

I have a 67 Continental Coupe with the original 462. 73k miles, well taken care of car. Car runs just fine, except in one particular situation. After the engine is hot, if I sit at idle for a bit, like at a long stoplight, when I start to accelerate, the car will occasionally stall. It seems fuel starved when it happens. Sometimes it stutters for a few seconds and seems to recover. Other times, it stutters and dies completely, which is no fun in the middle of a busy intersection.

It always starts right back up though, and then will run fine. In cool weather it is very infrequent, but as it heats up here in Orlando, it becomes more frequent. My mechanic has checked the fuel system and carb and can't seem to find anything wrong. He has also had difficulty recreating the problem on test drives, mostly because he doesn't stay in the car long enough in the heat. Car is driven daily, so I would love to get this addressed before our weather warms up more.

Thanks, Bill!

Derek

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Hello Derek -

That sounds like a real nice car that you have there! After reading over your letter a few times and assuming that your engine is in otherwise excellent tune with regards to ignition points, condenser, spark plugs, wiring etc. and your fuel is of a good quality I would strongly suspect a carburetor problem and in particular an accelerator pump issue. Even if your carburetor was recently rebuilt or overhauled the accelerator pumps are known to be a source of annoyance especially with today's low quality fuels that we all are being compelled to use. When the car is initially accelerated from a stop it is the pump that supplies a quick generous spritz of fuel to the engine as it begins to rev up to ensure that the vehicle gets smoothly underway. If this extra fuel is not available every time the result will be exactly the condition that you are describing. If your carb. has not been serviced it may be needing a cleaning which would include a new accelerator pump. This of course should be verified by your mechanic who should be quite knowledgeable of carbureted vehicles. I hope the above leads you to a good repair.

Sincerely,

Bill

1973 Continental Sedan Lighting Issues

Hi Bill,

My name is Steve and I have a nice '73 4D Continental.The problem I've been having goes something like this:

When I drive the car with the lights on for about 10 minutes something happens.All the lights (tail,dash,markers) with the exception of the headlights, start to go out and on again until I turn the lights off and wait a little and turn them back on.After a while it starts again.My guess is that something overheats in the circuit where those lights are connected and I checked the book and it says that there is some kind of a fuse built in the light switch to prevent overheating in the light circuit.If you could help me on this.

Thanks,

Steve

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Greetings Steve,

The headlight switch has two circuit breakers within the unit. One is for the headlights and the other is for the dash,tail and marker lights. When they open the circuit these breakers will flash the lights and reset as you describe after you turn the switch off. This issue can be caused by several things and these are .....a direct short to ground in the circuit, fatigued breaker inside the switch, a bad connection at the switch (which will transfer heat inside to the breaker it self) and an overloaded circuit that is caused by the addition of more lights than the circuit will tolerate etc. If ALL of your lights are working correctly for a period of time before the breaker starts to open the circuit I would suspect in your case a fatigued breaker or a bad contact at the switch itself. Of course the problem needs to be thought out and diagnosed carefully. Let us know what you find and of course we have any parts available that you may require for the repair.

Sincerely,

Bill

April 26, 2012

1969 Mark III Vacuum And Acceleration Issues

Hello,

I have air release under my dashboard, possibly preventing the vacuum system from allowing my headlight covers to close. Do I need to remove the dashboard to get to it or is the air release coming from the engine compartment. I replaced all visible vacuum lines and I suspect the air release under the dashboard is rotted or cracked.

One more question related to acceleration. When the car sits for an extended period of time, I can't accelerate in 1st gear. The car revs really high like the transmission is shot, however after it warms up a bit, no issues at all. Also, when I accelerate up a hill or at a faster pace then cruising, I get a rattling sound under the car as if something is loose, however nothing is and once the car levels out or I accelerate enough, it's quiet again. Any thoughts? Any assistance you can provide would be great!

Gerardo

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Hello Gerardo -

By air release I think that you mean a vacuum leak and yes a vacuum leak at certain vacuum hoses or vacuum switches will prevent the headlamp doors from closing. I cannot tell you to remove parts to find the leak because finding and repairing the leak may not require any major disassembly at all. If you can hear a vacuum leak under the dash, it may be caused by any number of hoses that has disconnected under the dash as the 69 Mark has several. I would carefully try to locate the culprit by listening to the leak and following the hoses from the headlight switch vacuum section as they lead to and through the firewall to the vacuum motors. The sw. itself may have fallen apart. Let us know what you find.

A transmission that is slipping and allowing the engine to rev up when cold would seem to indicate that the transmission is low on fluid. If it is not low on fluid it may require an overhaul and if that is suspected a visit to a trusted transmission shop may be needed for further diagnoses.

I can't tell from here what your rattling sound is when accelerating but what you describe could be engine pinging from incorrect ignition timing or low octane fuel. Your Mark is designed to operate on premium high octane fuel.

I do hope that the above helps you to correct these issues that you are currently experiencing. If you need anything further in the way of advice or parts please do not hesitate to contact us.

Sincerely,

Bill

1969 Mark III Power Window Issues

Hi Bill,

I've consulted you before and your advice was a Godsend so here I am again! On my 1969 Mark, I am trying to get all power windows working. I know every motor works, but controlling them is a different story.

Here's the current situation: I can only open and close both front windows, and only from the drivers side switch panel. The switches on the front left panel will not open the rear windows, nor do the rear switches work. I can say for certain that the wiring has been tampered with by a prior owner, but to what extent, I'm unsure. When I purchased the vehicle, everything worked. Magically, now it doesn't.

So I consult my wiring diagrams and am overwhelmed to say the least. From what I can tell, there should be power at each panel (panel being the black connector that the switch plugs into) at terminal number 328 (for passenger front and both rear) and terminal number 400 "a" and "b" (for front master panel). Is this correct?

I also assume that the bypass switch has to in proper working order for this whole system to work, as from what I can tell, each switch is wired through each other starting with the bypass switch. I also notice that stamped metal plates go between two pieces of "paper" on each master switch assembly. I assume these are also necessary.

Here's the question I have - is there a terminal (or multiple terminals) I can test for power (12V) to rule out faulty wiring and prove an inoperative switch, and how do I test a window switch to make sure it works, or is there a better Troubleshooting procedure for my current issue?

Thanks in advance for consult!

Dan

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Hi Dan -

We are glad that the Lincoln Land blog was able to help you. Some of the problem areas can be complicated at times and the power window circuits can be one of these areas. The power to operate the motors must travel from the switch to the motor and then to ground from the motor through the same switch. For the out board windows (rt. frt. and both rear 1/4 windows the power must travel not only from and back to the drivers switch but also in and out of each remote sw. as well. There is no easy way to address some of these issues and accurate diagnosis is very important. The only way to correctly diagnose the system is to test the power path of the circuits with the use of a 12v test light and the wiring diagram. The switches themselves have proven to be a big problem and many owners just go ahead and remove all of their switches and have them serviced but being able to diagnose only the faulty ones can be a real dollar saver. All of the wiring etc. of course must be intact with good connections to the switches as you indicate yours is or was. In addition to all of the above the rear side windows can suffer with some of their own special problems such as binding from lack of use and gear issues. If necessary please contact us further and Al may be able to offer more advice.

Sincerely,

Bill

1967 Wiper Issues

Hello bill and thank you for your time,

I have just recently replaced the power steering pump on my Lincoln. During start up for the first time I allowed the system to run with just the wipers on to assist in bleeding the system. The wipers worked for a while then I had some fluid back up into the reservoir then the wipers stopped working. The wiper motor now when the engine starts sends the wipers to an upright position and they stay there weather the switch is on or off? This has been stumping me now for a while, do I need a new motor or is there a fix? Please help!!

Thanks

C M Lutz

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Greetings Chris -

You don't tell us if the power steering itself is now working correctly in all respects. If the steering is operating properly and is quiet it would seem that some unknown problem has developed inside the wiper motor. I assume that the wipers operated correctly prior to the pump replacement. If this is so and you have not disturbed the wiper arm alignment I believe that all you can do now is to check the wiper motor cable adjustment. The wiper motor would need to be replaced if a problem in the motor is suspected. Is the hydraulic oil filter intact inside the reservoir? Some debris may have entered the motor or an internal seal could have failed. Please let us know what you find.

Sincerely,

Bill

April 18, 2012

1979 Town Coupe Steering Wheel Off Center - Light Issues

Hi Bill -

I have a 1979 Lincoln Continental Town Car (Coupe) with a 400 V8. It has 2 issues at the moment that both bother me quite a bit. The first is the steering wheel. It is on at least an 8th turn to the right when I'm driving straight, so I was wondering 2 things about it. One is does it have a clockspring? And if so, would I be able to simply park straight, remove the steering wheel and put it back on straight? The other is does this car have an adjustable drag link? I'm unable to take this car to a garage so I want to try to fix it myself. My other concern is my cornering light. When my headlights are on, my right cornering light is on.....always. When I turn on the left signal, however, it goes off while the left one goes on, and when the signal cancels after the turn and the left one goes off, the right one goes back on? I've ran up and down the wires several times and changed the bulb. What could be causing this issue? Thanks

Tanner

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Hello Tanner -

Your steering wheel should be able to be centered by repositioning it as you suggest and the tie rods are adjustable under the vehicle at the steering linkage. This tie rod adjustment should only be performed by a front end shop in order to maintain the critical alignment of the front end geometry. This car does not have a clockspring.

The cornering lights should only operate with the light switch in the on position. The power to the cornering light bulbs originates at the turn signal switch when it is activated and if all of your car's wiring appears intact this sw. could be your problem. To prove this out you should unplug the turn signal connector while the cornering light is on when it should in fact be off (as you describe). If it goes off when the sw. is unplugged it would then appear that the ts. sw. has an internal short and would need to be replaced. After you check this out contact us as we have these available if needed.

Sincerely,

Bill

April 13, 2012

63 Brake Light Issues

Hi Bill,

It's starting to warm up here in MN and I'm back at it slowly restoring my 63' Continental. I can't seem to get the brake lights to work. Signals work and tail lights work. I've read on a couple forums that there is another fuse box connected to the headlamp switch but I can't get the switch out underneath the dash to check the fuses. Am I going about this the right way? Any advice would be of great help. Thanks Bill!


Sincerely,

Zac

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Hi Zac -

The best way to begin a check of the brake light circuit is to test for power at the switch itself and then with the brakes applied test for power from the sw. into the turn signal sw. From there the power should come out of the t. s. sw. to the brake lights. The brake light sw. or the turn signal switch may be the culprit here if the wiring is o/k. A 12v test light and a correct wiring diagram for your vehicle is a big help. Please contact us further if you would need any diagrams or parts for the repair.

Sincerely,

Bill

April 9, 2012

1989 Lincoln Continental Electrical Short

Hello Bill,

I live in the Bay Area and own Lincoln Continental 1989. Local mechanics just charging lots of money and problem still persists. I am so confused. I have electrical shortage recently which burned my radio and knocked out normal idle valve operations. It was rebooted and radio fused was changed. However here is whats happening. When driving car shows high voltage increase and decrease. Its like going up and down up and down with message "charge system. All became bright and then back to normal. Heating unit on and off. It does not affect driving though, but the last time car stopped on the freeway with my whole family aboard. What would you recommend? To change voltage regulator?

Would appreciate if you have a good advise,

Thanks,

Max

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Hi Max -

Sorry to hear that you are experiencing difficulty with your 1989 Continental. Some of these electrical gremlins can be difficult to properly and quickly diagnose and can become quite costly. The problem worsens as the vehicle ages and the parts become scarce. All mechanics cannot of course be expected to be experts with all of the difficult quirks that these electronic systems in all makes of cars tend to develop as the vehicles become older. The trick is to find a good electrical shop that is able to and is willing to take the correct approach to successfully diagnose your Continentals issue.

The problems that you are presently experiencing could prove to be as simple as a loose critical body or engine ground circuit (loose wire) or it could be an alternator, electrical contact, bad battery or an engine management module. The idea is to correctly identify the problem in the shortest time. My advice for you is to find a known trusted and competent electrical shop that is close to where you are located. You should visit the owner or manager with all of your vehicle's repair history receipts regarding this matter for him to review in order to find out if his shop is in fact capable and willing to correct your issues. You may need to visit several repair shops before deciding on which one is correct for your car.

If you would wish to discuss this repair with Lincoln Land, please contact John Harroll here at 727-446-2193. he will be aware of your e-mail to us may be able to provide some further advice.

Sincerely,

Bill

1979 Mark Bill Blass Headlamp Issues

Hi,

I am having issues with the headlamp covers opening and closing on my '79 Lincoln Bill Blass... The car has the autolamp feature,and didn't do this before (years ago), however the car had been in storage for a number of years, and was wondering if there were some seals or something that are prone to drying up and leaking or something.

I took the vacuum lines off of the headlight door actuators and tried some self diagnosis with a handheld manual vacuum pump, and the doors would open and close. After ruling out vacuum leaks there, I then reversed the lines on the left hand side of the engine compartment...just so I could have the "cool factor" of the doors being closed while driving...in the daytime at least...not so cool when it gets dark and you pop the hood to reverse the lines again lol. I'm hoping that it's not the headlight switch itself, seems to be very difficult to find for a car with the autolamp option.

Anyway, a little about the car; it's a '79 Lincoln Mark V, Bill Blass, white and dark blue with white leather and electric moonroof. As far as I know, it has all options except a CB radio. The car was purchased new by my Dad in either 1978 or 1979, haven't been able to find the original bill of sale yet, but it'll turn up. My Dad passed away in 2008, and my Mom sold their house, however her new house only had an 18' long garage, and my Dad wanted this car kept in the family, so I brought it from it's original home (garaged since new) near Vancouver British Columbia to my home in Lloydminster, Saskatchewan where it stays in my heated garage. It has 46,000 kms on it now. It's near mint...except on the RHS door, it has a small door ding where my bicycle fell over when I was about 11 years old...(my butt still hurts!!!) lol.

Attached is a couple of pictures, and thanks for your site...lots of useful information.

Kevin Jurovich

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Greetings Kevin,

Your car looks like a very nice well optioned Mark. Driving and maintaining it should give you many years of pleasure. The "Autolamp" feature issues that you are experiencing and some of the methods to diagnose them have been posted previously on the blog. George will provide you with the links to them. If you would need the original correct shop manuals for your car (these include the AUTOLAMP section in very good detail) , any further information or any parts for the repair feel free to contact us at any time.

Sincerely,

Bill


Kevin -

If you type "autolamp" in the search section of our blog - you will find numerous posts in regards to your issues as this is a common problem on Lincolns. After you have reviewed these posts - please feel free to contact us with further questions. I have enclosed a link to the Blog with Autolamp already in the search.

George @ Lincoln Land

Link: http://www.lincolnlandinc.com/cgi-bin/mt/mt-search.cgi?IncludeBlogs=1&search=AUTOLAMP

March 27, 2012

1969 Continental Cooling Questions

Hello Bill,

I came across your blog trying to source a radiator for my 69 Lincoln Continental with a 460 engine. I live in New York and deal with a lot of heavy traffic, stop and go. I am looking for something that would have better cooling performance/ efficiency. Do you think you would have any leads or suggestions on what to get. Any help would be appreciated. By the way your blog is great. It provides a wealth of information for people like myself. Thank you for your efforts.

Fred

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Hi Fred,

We are pleased that you enjoy the blog. The only radiator used for your 69 should be of the three core design as used with factory A/C vehicles. If you somehow would need better cooling capacity the best and easiest way for you is to discuss the possibilities with some "well known and trusted" radiator shops in your area. The right shop will be able to custom build you one.

Having said that I will also say that the cooling systems in these 69's and most other Lincoln vehicles are very well designed and have proven to be more than adequate to handle any high temperature service in the U.S.A. However this is only true if the complete cooling system is well maintained in all respects. If some other component of your engine cooling system is faulty a larger capacity radiator will not pick up the slack. I hope that the above helps you and please feel free to contact us further regarding your 69 at any time.

Sincerely,

Bill

March 26, 2012

General Advise For Autolamp Issues From Bill....

Hello Lincoln lovers -

When pursuing issues with the Autolamp and Auto Headlamp dimmer operation we advise to examine the circuit with the device switched to the Manual operation first. Many faults originate from the "easier to diagnose" manual side of the circuit and are wrongly deemed to be a difficult electronic issue. If a problem is found here in the manual position it can be corrected and the complete system may become perfectly operative again. Once the manual side is checked and found to be in working order you can then move to diagnosing the more complicated Automatic portion.

We cannot emphasize enough that a shop manual and wiring diagram is a must in order to help diagnose many of these electronic devices. Even if you are not doing your own repairs, your technician will appreciate the shop manual and schematics that you provide. The manuals can save you many dollars and time and if you ever sell your car they may prove to be a selling point.

Sincerely,

Bill and the Lincoln Land Staff

March 23, 2012

Website Issues Now Corrected!

Everybody - thanks for your patience, Bill's Corner has been experiencing technical difficulties since mid January.

We have been answering the submitted questions directly - and have posted them as a group today.

Please feel free to email Bill with your questions - and hopefully the issues will not occur again....


The Lincoln Land Staff

1978 Mark Auto Lamp Issues

Hello Bill, and thank you for all your help in maintaining my vehicle.

I have an issue with the high beams on my 1978 Mark V Diamond Jubilee. The only time that they go on is when the lights are turned on with the high beams on.

If I put the headlights on with the low beams on, the high beams can not be activated by hitting the floor switch.

Also, if the high beams are on when I pull the headlight switch and I hit the dimmer switch on the floor to change to low beam, they can not be switched back to high beams.

The car has auto-dim and delay, and this also does not work with the high beams. I was told that there was a relay somewhere on the steering column that may be bad?


Thank you in advance.


Tony

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Tony -

You will need to do some diagnostic investigation into the problem. If you go to "Search" section on this blog, type in "Auto Lamp" and you will find numerous similar posts that will help. If you are in need of a Shop Manual - which will help you greatly, please contact us.

Sincerely,

Bill

1978 Continental Fuel Concerns

Hello,

I just recently bought a 78 Continental, the Diamond Jubilee Edition. I was wondering what octane of fuel I should use? So far I've been using 93 and all has been fine, but with the price of gas going higher and higher I was wondering if it's even necessary. I've looked all around the internet on this matter and haven't found any answers.

Thanks,

Jimmy

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Hello Jimmy,

Your 1978 Lincoln was built to operate on regular fuel "of the day". In theory it should perform just fine with todays regular fuel if the engine is in good condition and in good tune. As we know however we are now faced with many fuel concoctions and cocktails that may or may not require some tuning to your engine in order to operate as with the older fuel. The best way for you to choose a good performing and economical fuel for your car is to try some regular gas from your favorite supplier. Pay attention to the engines performance and especially for the sound of excessive pinging. Because excessive pinging can be detrimental in time to the engine be prepared to compensate by adjusting the timing or to blend some higher octane fuel with the lower octane in order to achieve a nice comfort level for your engine and pocketbook.

Sincerely,

Bill

1966 Brake Light Switch & Rough Idle Issues

Hello Bill,

I just came across your blog, and first off, I wanted to say thank you for all the valuable information that you provide to Lincoln enthusiasts; just after reading a couple of posts and your responses it gave me a better understanding of what I'm looking for. My issue is this:

I have a 1966 Lincoln continental that I have owned for a couple years, the car is not a daily driver, just a weekend cruiser or special occasion vehicle. The car runs pretty good, other than a rough idle, and delay in throttle response if I'm at a traffic light.

The problem that I'm trying to currently fix I believe is the brake light switch, what happens is the brake light (driver side) stays on constantly! I've had to disconnect my battery every time I get out of the car to ensure that I won't drain my battery. I'm wondering is that the brake light switch? And if so would all I need to do is replace it, I was told that it's underneath the brake pedal or near the passenger side firewall? I have a shop manual but haven't had much time to look through it (original shop manual).

That's my main issue; other than that the car runs well, any advice about the brake light switch and the rough idle would be deeply appreciated.

Thanks again for the blog -

Nima

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Greetings Nima,

We are happy that you are enjoying the blog. The first concern with a rough idle condition should be all of the basic tune up items and their adjustments. These will be spark plugs, high tension wires, ignition points and condenser etc. Next will be fuel and carburetion conditions. If any of these has been ignored for a long period of time the engine idle can be adversely affected. If all of the above are o/k the basic engine condition will need to be evaluated. This includes compression readings and valve condition, etc.

If the brake lights are remaining "on" with your foot off of the pedal the brake switch or its linkage could be suspect. The brake switch however operates the left and right side at the same time therefore I am concerned when you say that only the one side is sticking on. If this is so and your right side is not operating it suggests to me that your turn signal switch may also be faulty. The power from the brake light switch runs through the t/s sw. before going out to the brake lights. The wiring diagram in your manual should guide you further as you test the continuity of the circuit. If we can help you further with any advice or parts please do not hesitate to contact us at any time.

Sincerely,

Bill

1985 Lincoln Town Car Signature - Message Center Fault

Hi Bill,

I'm the very proud and new owner of a great condition 1985 Lincoln Town Car Signature. I recently moved to the USA, with my family, from England (United Kingdom) on a 3 year Military tour and have indulged in what I view as a classic and great piece of US car history. Having read the owners manual over and over again everything on the car apart from the message center works. Can you recommend a good source for the car wiring diagrams or a reputable parts dealer or even provide advice on rectifying the message center fault? The electronic dash simply displays random lights rather than coherent numbers or symbols albeit the fuel gauge display and speedometer work fine. Any help is greatly appreciated.

Regards

Paul

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Hi Paul,

Welcome to the U.S.A. and congratulations on the Lincoln purchase. The first advice that I will give you is to purchase the correct shop manual for your car. It will pay off big time for you in the future. At Lincoln Land we find that the electronic modules have been the faulty cause of your current issue and we have had success correcting the problem by substituting good units from our parts cars. Unfortunately we cannot provide you with any of the parts at the present time. We will in the future therefore I would suggest that you acquire a manual and get acquainted with the electronics section. We would be pleased to send one to your address. Call us at your convenience to make arrangements.

Sincerely,

Bill

77 Town Coupe Speed Control Issues - Update & Thanks!

Hi Bill!

Thank you so much!!!

I can tell you Bill.... I have never ever experienced that explanations has been so distinct in both words and documentations without a single cent to pay!!

Its totally unusual in Norway!! - Support gives you indeed an idea of what possible can be wrong in Norway too, but its way out of range or mind to demand documentations without pay for it.

I am so delighted and so satisfied with your support. We Norwegians has something to learn from you Bill!!

The way you explain the issue together with 8 pages of documentations, I suddenly saw "the whole picture".....

I will follow each step of your explanations.... I'm already on my way to the garage!!......

Thank You Sir!

Sincerely

Per Rogstad

77 Town Coupe Speed Control Issues

Hi Bill!

I`m from Norway and have purchased a beautiful 77 Lincoln Town Coupe. I have a little problem with the speed control. When I reach a speed of - lets say 50 miles and set the automatic speed control, the speed slowly increases. I was wondering if you could give me some advice for troubleshooting the issue.

I have been told its an issue due to the vacuum system - causes some tubes or leakages somewhere - or is it something else I should been looking into?

Looking forward to your response!

Thanks!

Med hilsen,

Per Rogstad

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Per -

Congratulations an your recent Town Coupe purchase. The speed control does use vacuum but it does consist also of an amplifier, a servo unit and switches which are all electronic. The vacuum system for the speed control can easily be examined under the hood for leaks and cracks etc. but the problem that you are describing is usually caused by a faulty amplifier or the servo in our experience. The shop manual contains a section on the speed control that includes trouble shooting but may not show your exact symptom of slowly creeping to a higher speed in the "set" position. Here at Lincoln Land we sometimes substitute "good known" modules as part of the diagnosis in order to be accurate. Your vacuum circuit for the speed control should therefore be inspected first in all respects. As a courtesy we will include in our advice for you today a copy of the section of the manual that pertains to speed control. We will of course be available to you for further advice or parts etc. at any time.

Sincerely,

Bill

January 23, 2012

1962 Convertible Charging Issues

Bill,

I'm new to this, but I thought I would give it a shot.

I recently acquired a 62 Lincoln Convertible, it used to turnover and start on demand, then the battery went dead, but was still able to start by jumping it. Finally I bought a new battery for it (not sure if this is relevant or not, but the old battery had 750 CCA's, the new one I got and put in had 810 CCA).

I hooked up the new battery it fired right up, and all was well. Then the next day I go out to start it and nothing. Won't even turnover, all I get is a clicking sound when I turn the key. That clicking sound is coming from the breaker/fuse box on the passenger side firewall. I opened the fuse box and nothing's blown, then in the lower half of the box it all looks OK, nothing is loose and all connections are secure (I'm not sure what that part is called in the lower half of the fuse box, if you know please inform me).

The starter is new and all connections are good, so that shouldn't be the problem. If you could help me out in any way shape or form please feel free, this car is too beautiful to just be sitting there and not starting for some simple reason over a part that is easily replaceable.

Thanks,

Nate

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Hi Nathan -

Congratulations on your recent 62 Continental convertible purchase. These are great cars to own and cherish and can give you many years of happy ownership. They are however not known as low maintenance vehicles.

If the batteries that you are using are new and are in good order in all respects and if jumping the battery still restarts the engine it sounds to me that some electrical item is discharging your battery during the time that you are not starting the engine. Perhaps a light such as a glove box light or a courtesy light etc. remains on at all times that you are not aware of.

Another possibility is that the charging system may not be charging the battery or could have an electrical fault that is actually robbing power from the battery when the engine is not operating. In any case if you are not skilled in automotive electrical diagnosis and do not have a wiring diagram or shop manual I would advise you to fully recharge and then disconnect the battery when you are not starting the engine. This action will prove to you that your battery is or is not the culprit until you can find the "power draw" gremlin or locate a technician that can do the correct diagnosis for you.

Sincerely,

Bill

January 6, 2012

1986 Town Car Fuel Gauge Issues

Hello Bill,

I have a 1986 Town Car with 37K miles and I am having trouble with the fuel gauge. It has frozen up on empty and won't release to the correct position. I had it replaced in 2008 and the new one has done the same thing. I have been told its an issue due to the ethanol in the new gasolines available currently. I had a friend tell me to run some fuel system cleaner through it and it should clear it up. He said put three of the fuel concentrated bottles in one tank of gas and it should work. Is this recommended or should I pass on this advice? Looking forward to your response.

Thanks.....

Mark
Tuscaloosa, AL

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Hi Mark,

Nice car. I had an 86 Town Car and found it to be a great car. We are not experiencing the ethanol problems with the fuel sending units as you are describing. One of the most common failures that we see that cause an empty reading from the fuel tank unit is a float that has developed a leak. This causes the arm to sink and remain in the "empty " position. We can rebuild many of these units or supply the float if you would need it. If you believe that your issue is caused by the tank unit you could remove it and inspect the float. If the float is breached we can easily supply a new one. If the float is ok and the problem appears to be internal you could send the unit it to us for further testing and or rebuilding. I hope this helps you to a speedy repair.

Sincerely,

Bill

December 28, 2011

1961 Charging Issues

Bill,

I am working on a 1961 Lincoln Continental, and I am having trouble with the charging system.

I have had the generator rebuilt and replaced the voltage regulator with a new unit. At idle the generator light is shining brightly. Once I get the vehicle off idle the light goes out and the generator charges. Is there anything I can do to remedy this problem?

The car has to be close to 1000 rpm before the light will go off which is obviously to high for idle speed. Is there a spec as to how many volts the generator should output at idle? I understand generators do minimal charging at idle, and you can expect the light to flicker at a stop with the headlight or other accessories on - but at idle with a fully charged battery and no loads it should not be on brightly.

Have you ever had this problem?, and if so do you have any recommendations. I have checked the system over multiple times and I cannot find any problems. I am starting to consider finding a smaller pulley to speed up the armature. I am out of ideas otherwise. I would be glad to supply any other information or answer any other questions you have. Any help would be greatly appreciated.

Thanks,

Brian

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Hello Brian,

I agree with you that the generator light can come on at periods of idle and electrical loads, but should not be brightly lit at the higher RPM's.

If you believe that your charging rate is excessively low at idle and engine speeds above idle according to the generator warning light, you can verify the charging voltage with a volt meter hooked up to the battery terminals. The voltage to the battery as supplied from the charging system must be higher than the battery voltage in order for the battery to charge and that charging voltage must not be excessively high or an overcharging condition will occur.

I am assuming of course that the wiring on your Lincoln is correct and in good operating condition and has not been modified. The battery also must be in good all around condition and able to receive and store a charge, etc. If you feel that the above is correct then your next step is to revisit the regulator and generator. New regulators and generators can and do fail. If your rebuilder is local, he should be happy to verify that the generator and regulator are operating correctly for you on the car. If not, many local parts houses such as Advance or Autozone, etc., also offer this service at no charge.

I hope that the above suggestions help but if you are still having problems with the diagnosis or need parts assistance, please contact us at any time.

Sincerely,

Bill

December 20, 2011

1979 Mark V New Owner Questions....

Hello Bill -

I just purchased a 79 Mark V with 25,000 original miles. The brake lights were on and the brakes looked a little frozen, so I did a complete brake job (front and rear). I was able to turn the rotors. The brakes were original and rotors had never been turned.

The brakes work perfect but the brake light is still on, I replaced all of the brake fluid and bleed the brakes. This car does have the Sure-Track system. How do I know if this is a Sure-Track system issue? I did notice that the 4 Amp fuse was missing so I replaced that. The brake light is still on. Where do I start looking to trace this problem?

Also, under the dash, just below the radio is a female plug with 14 posts. Nothing is plugged into this. What is it? I cannot seem to locate it in the service manual. Is this a plug for some type of an electronic trouble shooting meter?

Everything on the car works properly, including accessories, radio, power sun roof, power seats, power windows, etc.

Thank you

Nick

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Hi Nick
I assume that you are speaking of the brake warning light on the dash and not the brake lights at the tail lights. The usual problem with the dash warning light remaining on is caused by the switch in the proportioning valve remaining in the unbalanced position. The brakes must be bled as per the MANUAL as shown in the brake section regarding centering the switch action to turn off the light. To prove that this switch is indeed the problem it is located under the brake master cylinder and can be unplugged to see if the light then turns off. If the light turns off when it is unplugged, the system will need to be bled as described above or the switch is frozen in position and will need to be unfrozen or replaced. After you investigate this issue further, if you need more advice please contact us directly.
We are not sure what your 14 pin electrical connection is or if it is a factory connection but it could be a part of a factory Citizen Band Radio option. The cars of that vintage did not have a diagnostic plug under the dash. If you can send us a photo we could probably identify it positively.

Sincerely,

Bill

December 6, 2011

66 Convertible Issues

Bill
I have a '66 Convertible (C-level, driver-type) in need of some minor repair and possible restoration so I wanted to get your ideas.

First problem is the driver side door handle is broken and the housing/console that holds the electrics has come detached from its mount. John Cashman (the Lincoln guy?) traveled thru Pensacola and worked on this and other issues a few years ago but it's now become totally detached from the door. I assume the entire piece will need replacement and have emailed the parts dept there to get info as well. Is that something a local shop should handle or is it too unique?

Also, I have ongoing battery/power issues and it even stopped while running once. Trouble shooting by my mechanic appears to narrow to electric window problems drawing the power down over time but he's really not sure. Never seemed to do this until over the last year. Any other ideas?

Just to add, I don't drive it that often, mostly on nice weather days and usually 1-2x a month but less now given these problems.

Last question, I'm not looking for show car level but if I really wanted to bring it up to a higher condition, I'm not sure how to go about finding someone, what would you recommend?

I appreciate your input.

Thanks,

Greg

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Hello Greg -

Welcome to our blog. I understand that John has already spoken to you regarding your armrest issues. Your ongoing electrical power problems should be diagnosed with the use of a correct wiring diagram for your 66. Suspected circuits can then be isolated in a logical sequence in order to "pin down" the faulty component. Popular items in our experience have proven to be.....Faulty battery, alternator, regulator or interior lights remaining on etc.

Your last question can take in as much territory as your personal needs and desires will allow. There are not many limitations as to the amount of time and money that can be spent in restoring an automobile such as a Lincoln Convertible. In your case a good strategy might be to pick out one or two items and bring them up to good operating condition during a period of time. You can then enjoy the vehicle in between these repairs. Or if you reside in a location where the weather is wintery and you wish that the car be left at a repair shop for an extended period of time then you must choose your restoring technician very carefully. He must be acquainted with the luxury aspects of your Lincoln and he must be willing to work with you regarding what your wants and needs are. Please contact us directly at Lincoln Land and ask for Chris or John and we will give you further advice based on your lcation and personal needs are.

Sincerely,

Bill

November 28, 2011

1988 Mark Gas Pedal Issues

Hello Bill,

I just bought a 1988 Mark VII Bill Blass in pretty rough shape cosmetically. It seems to run real good, except I noticed that the gas pedal is hard to push, and at distance drives, my leg and foot get tired from the forceful stance I have to take to keep an even speed. Is there a way to fix That?

Thanks so much,

Rob

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Rob -

If the accelerator on your Mark VII is actually more difficult than others to operate I would check it by disconnecting the accelerator cable from the throttle body at the engine to determine if the cable is the culprit or if the throttle body itself has become stiff. Doing this will tell you which part needs to be serviced. Another thought is that a previous owner may have modified the cable or throttle body to compensate for a poor throttle return issue. The above inspection should be easy to do and you can contact us again with the results for further advice.

Sincerely,

Bill

October 31, 2011

1966 Brake Light Issues

Hello Bill,

I bought my 66 Lincoln Continental Convertible about 11 years ago and have been slowly restoring and upgrading it over the years. One problem which has always haunted me is the brake lights. No matter what I do, I am unable to get them to work by depressing the pedal. I initially suspected the brake light switch and electrical issues. I removed the switch, depressed the strike plate, and the brake lights came on. So, fortunately there was not an electrical issue. I had a mechanic install a new booster assembly since I suspected the old one was on it's last leg, but still no change. I did find a minor leak on the rear brake hose and replaced it as well. I conducted a very thorough bleeding of the brakes once this was all done. There is a good solid pedal and good stopping. But still no change in the brake light situation. I have had several different recommendations as to what to do next, but I needed to consult with someone with proper knowledge first. I have been told to find a way to adjust the length of the rod, add an additional booster, etc. My only other remote suspicion is replacing the mess of vacuum lines throughout the car. I have discovered several cracked or split lines and repaired them, but there are many more to go.

Any help or advice you could offer would be greatly appreciated. Thank you for your time.

Thanks,

Jeremy

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Hi Jeremy -

Your 66 Convertible is a great car to have and is well respected among all of the car collectors. The brake light switch because of its design must be tested for continuity in the installed position with a 12v test light. While testing, the switch and its wiring must NOT be distorted so you may need a helper to depress the brake pedal for you. If the switch worked while you tested it off of the car and will not operate in the installed position the switch may still be faulty or there could be some missing switch installation hardware. A shop manual would be a real asset to you for any repairs if you do not already have one. Please try this test again as described above and call us with the results or for further advice.

Sincerely,

Bill

October 21, 2011

1978 Continental Electrical Gremlins

Hello Bill,
I bought a 78 Lincoln Continental. I noticed that when I turn my key to the on position that my warning lights don't come on such as the engine, alternator, washer fluid, in dash blinkers, etc. I changed my fuses and accidentally got the radio to play. The car sat since 1996. I noticed that every time I start it, something else starts working like the power seats and power antenna. I'm no mechanic but could it be simple enough for me to figure out or should I go to a shop. I stumbled across this site tonight and I'm loving it already.

Thanks,

Daryl

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Daryl -

From your description of electrical issues and the fact that some accessories are starting to operate on their own as you try them it sounds to me like you have a variety of bad electrical contacts. The car has been stored for a lengthy period of time in an unknown atmosphere that seems to have caused this to occur. The only procedure that I can suggest at first glance is to select an non operating item and carefully trace its electrical power path. For instance power from the ignition switch in the run position exits on a red wire with a green tracer and leads to the alt. warning light circuit and fuse number three in the fuse box etc. Testing the electrical circuit should be done in a logical sequence and most definitely with the CORRECT wiring diagram at your side. With the correct 12v test light you or your technician should soon be able to locate and correct any open and or poor contacts that you find. We hope that the above will get you started in the right direction. If you need any further advice etc. please contact us at any time.

Sincerely,

Bill

October 17, 2011

"Rolan! the damn car won't start"

"Rolan! the damn car won't start"

These were the words that myself, my brother and sister heard many times throughout our childhood and into adulthood.

It all started on a January morning in 1972. It was a cold that morning with a bright sun, snow was everywhere but the roads were clean. and in front of Northwest Lincoln-Mercury, in Schaumburg Ill. was a shiny 1969 Lincoln Continental Sedan, ready to come home.

My father was very proud, my mother happy as she just "one upped" her sister who drove a 1968 Cadillac Fleetwood Brougham..Mom had the newest car.

As we grew up, moms frustration with the Lincoln grew.. Dad was always at the short end of the stick, with no answers except, "I'll look at it"

You see, the car would start up fine when cold, after being driven a while, then turned off, and tried to re-start.... it would rawr, rawr, rawr and would not start. (slow starter drag) many times with a car full of kids and groceries, we would have to wait the allotted 15-20 minutes until it would start.

Once we got home, dad would get the wrath of mom... It was something we just got used to with the Lincoln over the next 25 plus years.

Fast forward to today - "finchie" has overhauled Engine/transmission/rear end/HVAC and all associated components... and guess what, she still has the same issues..

On my first trip out to Starbucks, and very proud to have car back from the shop, I got the same issue, rawr, rawr, rawr... That old feeling was back...

I could heard the echoes of my mom yelling at my father saying... "Rolan! the damn car won't start", all I could do is laugh, drink my Starbucks coffee and wait my allotted 15-20 minutes before the Lincoln will start... I even called my brother to tell him to guess what I was doing, we had a good laugh....

Bill - So what is it with these Lincolns??? My father is no longer with us, but Mom is and for some strange reason, I'd like to give her the answer that he never could.

Sincerely,

Rolan

P.S. The Lincoln and Cadillac occupy the same driveway space and are happy together....and a huge Thank you for all the technical support, parts sales!

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Rolan -

Are you sure that you want to spoil family tradition by correcting that starting issue? A 15-20 minute wait sounds like "coffee time " to me!

Hot starting issues indicated by "slow starter drag" as you state are usually caused by a high starter draw, a bad or weak battery or poor wiring in the starting circuit. If the car has had this problem since it was new we can probably rule out the battery but a wiring fault and or a bad starter motor could exist though for all of these years since 1969. Some factory defects can survive for the life of a vehicle if they are allowed to go on unaddressed. I assume that the engine timing and the general tune up conditions are in good order as these can and do contribute to hard hot starts. Another item that can cause hard hot cranking can be bad engine bearings. I know this first hand as my 1970 Lincoln suffered with this until I changed the bearings. It is of course well advised to begin by looking at the smaller easier to repair possibilities first as described above. Because this issue existed from when the car was new I would examine the starter circuit wiring very carefully as some wiring faults can be hidden deep within the insulation. Hope this helps.

Sincerely,

Bill

October 11, 2011

74 Mark Charging Issues

Good morning i have a 74 Lincoln Mark that won't keep a charge on the battery. I have replaced the battery, the alternator and temporarily bypassed the voltage regulator. At the battery while the car is running, I get about 13 volts unstable. With the replacement of the regulator cause me to get a good full and reliable charge?

Sincerely,

A.J.

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A.J. -

To answer your question simply, replacing the voltage regulator will solve a charging problem ONLY if it is faulty. The alternator, regulator, battery and their related wiring work together to keep the battery in a charged condition. Even though you have installed another battery and alternator the possibility exists that one of them could still be the problem. New parts can be bad. Because of this your charging system along with the battery should be tested using the correct equipment in order to pinpoint the failed part. Many local automobile parts stores offer this service at no charge. They will do these tests on the car or if you remove and bring the parts to them. At the same time I recommend that the battery be tested in order to verify that it can actually receive, hold a charge and be able to withstand a load test. If you are confident that the alternator, battery and the wiring is ok you may opt to install a new regulator as a test.

You don't indicate in your information if your battery is always undercharged, dead overnight or weak after several days etc. so another point to consider is the possibility of a power draw from another area in the vehicle. Many times in the past we have found that items such as courtesy lights, glove box lights, clocks etc. can discharge a battery after a period of time if they are faulty or remain on. We have also found that alternators that perform well with the engine running will draw power after the engine is shut down. I hope that the above helps to resolve your problem. If you need any further advice feel free to contact us at any time.

Sincerely,

Bill

October 10, 2011

New Owner 1966 Continental

Getting a 66 coupe in a trade.. always liked the 66 my dad had several of them when i was a kid and i wish he was still around to ask this question to,... Is there anything outside of the normal stuff that i need to look out for on this car? it has a rebuilt engine that seems to run strong except the carburetor needs a rebuild. it as a little bit of a coolant leak coming from the fitting that is indeed the back of the intake manifold.. looks like it could be a gasket. other than that every thing works.. and the body isn't bad. no rot that i can see anywhere.. . it drives well and stops on a dime. needs exhaust but hell, i would replace that anyway.. the only thing that i think doesn't work right is the AC.. it is all there but there is no freon in it.. (are there any good R-12 replacements out there). i cant think of anything else to tell you.. except it seemed to be running a tad hot when i opened the hood.. but with an engine that size i can see heat would be an issue.. I have never messed with a MEL but i understand some of the differences but not all.. Is there anything i need to look out for or be aware of?

I am getting ready to move to Modesto CA.. and I want to make this car my daily driver so any tips you can give me for reliability i would appreciate it..

Thanks a ton! Glad you guys are here for us morons! lol

Mike
Omaha NE

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Hi Mike -

Welcome to the forum and congratulations on your 66 Lincoln purchase. It sounds like it has been looked after and is in real decent shape. You have already uncovered an exhaust problem and a coolant leak so rather than give you a long list of possible other problems I will make a few suggestions since you are moving to another part of the country.

Even though the brakes appear to be in good working order they should be inspected for that long road trip. The steering linkage, suspension and tires should also be checked and all worn parts and tires replaced. If you plan on keeping the car you should consider also purchasing the necessary Ford shop manuals as they can pay for themselves in a short time. The Lincolns are all built with many "state of the art" (for their day) luxury devices that can eventually fail in time. Not all cars have the same parts and systems fail so it is best to get some experience with your car and make a list of issues as they appear. You can then tackle these items one at a time. As I stated above, your car sounds like it was looked after so many of the usual issues may have already been addressed. There is a popular site available on the Lincoln and Continental Owners Club ( LCOC ). It is a website that can easily be found and you can read about the many problems that others have encountered and their repair procedures etc. I think that you will enjoy the reading and gain more knowledge on all years of Lincolns on this forum.

In my opinion there is no real substitute for the r12 refrigerant but there are several refrigerants that have proven to be acceptable to many owners. If you ask twenty people you could get twenty answers. When you are located at your new address you can ask the other owners that visit the many local car shows in your new location. They will be aware of what refrigerant product is acceptable and legal in that State.

We sure hope that the above helps you and if you need any parts or further advice for the 66 you can count on us at Lincoln Land to help you.

Sincerely,

Bill

September 29, 2011

1968 462 Engine Rebuild Question

Hello Bill -

I'm having trouble with the #5 main cap to the crank shaft. I can't remove it. Is there a way to remove it that I don't damage the cap or the crank shaft.

Thanks,

David

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David,

Because of the design of the sealing surfaces on this rear main cap removing in can be very difficult in many cases. I consulted with Erik Dalemans here at Lincoln Land and he advises as follows. The cap has two threaded holes that serve as an attachment for the oil pan. He sometimes needs to thread in two longer bolts into these holes so that the bolts can be used as leverage to gently rock and pull the cap free. Tools such as vise grips etc. can be used on the bolts to carefully rock or pry the cap free and guide it down and out. Advising you with the situation that you are in is difficult at best without actually being there on scene. With a little patience and care you should be successful. I do hope that the above helps you. If you have any further questions please contact us.

Sincerely,

Bill

September 28, 2011

1969 Mark III Flashing Headlights

Bill,

On my 1969 Mark III the headlights will flash wildly and there is a weird buzz that occurs when the headlight dimmer trys to change either high to low or low to high. The headlights come on fine when first turned on but drive 3-4 minutes and the flashing begins. I no longer drive it after sundown.

Patrick

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Hi Patrick,

I assume that you have the Automatic Headlamp Dimmer option. If so it sounds like the Photo Amplifier unit is faulty. It is located outside on the cowl near the windshield. I would try unplugging this unit and then operate the headlamps to see if they then operate normally. If so you may need another unit as these are non serviceable. There is also a Power Relay unit in the circuit but your description sounds like a Photo Amplifier issue as discussed above. Have you tried operating the headlamps with the beams locked on low position. This as you may know is operated by the foot dimmer switch that is located at the left floor area near the left air vent outlet and is visible in the carpet. Pressing this switch with your foot will switch the beams from Hi to Low and you should hear no buzzing or experience any automatic Hi /Lo beam switching when in the Lo beam position. The Autodim feature only operates in the Hi beam position. You also don't say if there is a reaction when you adjust the sensor dial behind the headlamp knob as adjusting this this may help or change the situation. At Lincoln Land we would however try another relay and if that fails to correct the erratic operation we would then try the Photo Amplifier. If you have more information after trying the adjustment or would need any parts or further advice please contact us at any time. The procedure for troubleshooting the Automatic Headlamp dimming is provided in the Shop Manual. This manual would be a benefit to you.

Sincerely,

Bill

September 12, 2011

1957 Premiere Brake Issues

Bill -

I have a 57 Premiere with 64K miles on it.... Had the brake booster replaced and since then, it is undriveable. The brakes are so tight that anything more than 1/2 inch of pedal movement threatens to throw you thru the windshield. Very difficult to manage on an incline, so it sits in the driveway. How are these brakes adjusted so it is driveable again? I have other cars from the era so I know that power brakes and steering are different but not like this.

Thanks in advance,

Richard

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Hello Richard -

Brake issues such as you are experiencing should be actually road tested in person by anyone who is trying to diagnose a problem. If I am understanding your description though you are describing a harsh and very sensitive braking action that is hard to control. Your statement..... "had brake booster replaced and since then it is undriveable"..... may be the key to the problem. I believe that you should consult with the shop that rebuilt and or installed the booster and advise them what you are experiencing. This condition is not uncommon and in many cases the cause is an incorrect usage or installation of a repair part. The rebuilder will probably be concerned and will advise you exactly what action to take as this type of braking action is undesirable can be unsafe. If you can provide us with any additional information or would like to discuss this further please feel free to contact us at any time. I do hope that the above helps to quickly resolve your problem.

Sincerely,

Bill

September 6, 2011

1979 Mark V Hard To Start When Cold

Hi Bill,

I Have a 79 Mark V Collector's Series, 20K miles with a mystery problem I am at a dead on. When engine is cold it takes up to 50 pumps to get started. 3 years ago it took 10 to 20. Once started it runs perfect in every way and restarts when warm with a half pump.
Car has new plugs, wires, cap, rotor, gas and air filter. Linkage seems tight and normal, butterfly closes as it should on first pump. A good spray of carb cleaner into the carb helps it to start easier.

Logically it seems like gas in draining back and all the pumps are bringing fuel back to the carb but several people tell me this is impossible. Most parts on this car are original
Once it starts choke seems normal. Slightly higher idle for a few minutes, then normal
No gas odor, no exhaust smoke. No sign of flooding.

You can see why I need your detective work....

Thank you Bill,

Charlie

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Hello Charlie -

Some of these cold start problems can be frustrating but sometimes the answer turns out to be simple. An engine requires a strong battery, starter motor, good ignition and a fresh clean fuel mixture to start. When cold the engine also needs a richer mixture. Assuming that your ignition is in good order as you are indicating I think that you should examine the fuel system first. The choke on a cold engine start should be fully closed even while cranking. When the engine starts the choke opens slightly and continues to slowly open completely as the engine warms up. Fuel in the carburetor should be available in abundance at this time for the correct mixture. You tell us that the addition of carb. cleaner helps it to start easier. For this reason I think that you should hold the choke open on the cold engine and carefully observe the inside of the carb. with a light while pumping the linkage. This is of course is done with the ignition key OFF for the purpose of checking the fuel availability to the cold engine from the carb. If the ignition is strong and plenty of fuel is pumped into the carburetor at this time and the choke is operating as described above the engine will start. If fuel is not pumping into the carb. during this test you have a fuel delivery problem to the carb. or the accellerator pump inside the carb. is faulty. You would then need to check for a plugged fuel filter at the carb. and then perform a fuel pressure and volume test. This is outlined in the manual and will reveal if there are any problems for the fuel to be able to flow correctly from the tank to the carburetor. Fuel cannot drain back from the carb. and into the lines as the vehicle sits unused but if the car has sat for a long period of time the fuel can evaporate and deteriorate. In this case a few seconds of cranking will replenish the fuel bowl if the fuel delivery system is performing for you as designed. You may discover during the above tests that your problem is indeed a fuel delivery issue and that this ciircuit will need a complete inspection and maintenance. This service is normal for a vehicle of this age. I hope that the above provides you with "food for thought" and helps to quickly locate the starting problem with your MK V. If we can be of further help with any advice or parts etc. please do not hesitate to call.

Sincerely,

Bill

1962 Vacuum Issues

Hi Bill,

I have a 62 Lincoln which I imported from the States to Australia this year and now are trying to put back the Vacuum tubes to the right spots as many of the lines have been disconnected by the previous owner.

I have several Diagrams and workshop manuals of the Vacuum circuits but none of them explain clearly the second Vacuum tank under the passenger front guard. It has two lines coming out of it and am assuming one goes

to the right hand heater temp regulator valve, but not sure of the other line or if the Vacuum tank is partitioned off in the center making it act like two tanks as I've seen on a drawing with a line through the middle of the tank.

On my 62 the left hand tank feeds the break booster as well as the left hand heater etc.


Regards,

Dale

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Hello Dale,

That 62 will be a nice car for you in Australia. The vacuum tank at the right fender in front of the right front wheel is as you suspect, a dual tank in one unit. It is actually partitioned inside and is used as two separate vacuum reservoirs. One section is for the Heater or Heater/Air Conditioner vacuum supply, and the other section is for the Power Door Lock vacuum supply. The Heat and AC section at that canister is the ONLY vacuum supply for that complete circuit ( left and right heater ). The vacuum reservoir at the left fender is ONLY for the Power Brake booster. If you feel that any of your vacuum diagrams etc. are inadequate we should be able to supply you with further information. We hope that the above helps and we look forward to looking after any of your future requirements that you may have.

Sincerely,

Bill

August 30, 2011

1969 Mark III Questions....

Hi Bill,

Just had two quick questions for you.

On a '69 Mark III, I just replaced the blower motor. I've connected everything back together the way it came apart, and now air only comes out of the defrosters no matter what setting I have it on. I don't believe I missed anything. What could cause this?

Issue # 2: How do I get the wipers operational in that they shut off when I turn them off. Right now, I can turn the knob all the way to the left, yet they still remain on until they decide they want to shut off, i.e. I could be driving around for 4 days with them on.

Thanks in advance for any insight you may have!

Dan

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Hi Dan -

Both of your problems could be easy for you to correct. Your 69 Mark as well as others has an automatic default to the Defrost mode if the Climate Control system looses vacuum. When you replaced the blower motor you probably dislodged a vacuum line. The most likely place is at the ATC box or the recirc vacuum actuator as they are next to the right kick panel area at the firewall. You would have been working in that location. Check carefully near that or any other area where you were working for a vacuum line that is unplugged.

If the wipers are slow to turn off you should check the wiper motor cable adjustment which is located behind a small removable panel behind the engine at the firewall. The wiper motor hydraulic hoses can be seen passing through this panel. It is a simple cable control that can be adjusted for a more complete "off" position of the wiper motor control lever. The other possibility is the vacuum bleed for the windshield washer vacuum actuator. This feature sends a pulse of vacuum to the wiper motor when the washer button is activated to allow for several swipes of the wipers in order to clean the windshield. This vacuum is bled off after a few seconds and the wipers stop. If the vacuum fails to bleed from the vacuum hose the wipers will remain on. The small bleed off module is located in the vacuum line near the brake booster and is easy to clean and adjust. In some cases the wiper motor will need to be replaced if the adjustments do not correct the problem. If you are not familiar with this wiper system or the adjustments and need further instructions, call us at Lincoln Land and ask for Al Baker. He will be aware of your recent enquiry. I hope that this helps you correct the problems quickly.

Sincerely,

Bill

August 18, 2011

1979 Mark V Overheating Issues

Hi Bill -

Thanks so much for your time. Quickly about myself. I'm ASE and I-CAR certified in many areas. I own and run a small business in classic car restoration named 'Take It To Hart'. Auto repair and restoration has been my passion for well over 35 years. I eat, sleep, dream and at times bleed oil.

Much of the comprehensive work you will read isn't just due my dilemma. Moreso, this is just the way I tend vehicles and/or provide maintenance.

The vehicle: In using the 'Condition Rating System', I'd rate my Mark V continental as category 2. No real restoration has ever been needed. Other than belts, tires, carb., etc., things remain original and intact. This Mark was issued an appraisal several years back of over $12,000.

I am the second owner of this '79 Mark, with only 59xxx original miles. I know the original owners quit well. The Mark looks fantastic, rides and preforms just as fine as she purrs.
Over the last month; motor/trans. cleaned and detailed. Oil/filter, trans. fluid is either fresh or at manufactures acceptable range/viscosity/life expectancy...

Tune-up: new is/are the control mod., coil pack, resistor, cap, rotor, alt., wires and plugs. All air filters too have been replaced along with the snorkel tube and the likes.
Cooling system (no kinks) new: radiator just before I purchased made purchase, cap (16lb.) water pump and gasket, coolant; correct type correct with the correct mix balance, coolant hoses and clamps, second thermostat and gasket, all vacuum lines and a number of vacuum/sending units, (water valve and the like are operating as designed).

The A/C is 134a. I only operate the a/c for liberating itself. I want to recall the car having an air pump for emissions. I also want to recall not having a belt installed. If this is correct then the car has been this way prior my ownership, and long before any overheating / boil over issues. All other belts replaced and adjusted to the correct tension specs. Shroud is fully intact and without flaw. The fan too is undamaged. (I don't see, nor can I find any info. on-line as to a clutch like drive to the cooling fan. I want to recall however that when I replaced the water pump there was only a very small coil spring. Hum, maybe not. At present I would have to say the fan is directly driven off the crank.

Last week when I replaced the coolant hoses, I took off the heater core cover cap. There wasn't debris inside the case. All was resealed at re-assembly.
I haven't any fluids mixing together, nor do I blow smoke from the tail pipe at any point in time. No kinks and/or obstructions in the exhaust lines/pipes. I could stand to tighten the exhaust manifold to tail pipe a bit.

Am I missing something? Lord, I don't want to hear heads, or block in your reply.... just kidding on this last part. I can't tell you how appreciated any food for thought would be at present. A mere and measly 4xxxx mile is all I've been able to put on the vehicle since ownership. For over 6 years it's been one thing following another. Literally. The prior owner has no recall to overheating. They are even older school then I, and only provided service when something broke. Today I'll install a back flush. Old school thing for me be this un/necessary.

Again, many thanks!
Suffering from the Queen Mary blues
Darrell

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Darrell -

For your overheating issue I need to ask you a couple of important questions before replying. Does the overheating occur at a steady highway speed or is it during times of idling or in heavy hot traffic? When the overheating begins do you notice the Hot engine light is on or do you only notice Boiling over and steam etc. from the engine?

Bill

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Wow, Bill, what a quick reply. I was only hoping to have such a turn around time. I'd be happy to send you pixs of the Mark if interested. Thanks also for your compliments on my tending her and her needs. Most importantly, I've very excited to be a part of the group. I hope that in some way I can make my own contribution.
I'll be short and brief at this hour. As for your questions...

1. Does the overheating occur at a steady highway speed or is it during times of idling or in heavy hot traffic? The actual spew/boil over is when the car is shot off. I'm unsure if I'm spilling during idle. As you could imagine, I don't want to be idle when I've begun to smell the coolant, so, I'll slow up so I don't have to stop. During these conditions I do most anything to be making my way home. I've had this car towed 5 plus times as I was just too far from home. I'd hate to do any permanent damage. This car isn't new so a limp hope is more less out of the question.

2. When the overheating begins do you notice the Hot engine light is on or do you only notice Boiling over and steam etc. from the engine? I've learned to keep an eye on the instrument panel light but am always disappointed. The light lights, but never during the moments I'd expect it to. When the ignition is turned off, after about or around 1 minute, I begin to hear the boiling from the overflow can. I keep the hood closed as not to damage the paint. Once i know any possibility of spewing is over, I allow the hood open for a quicker cool down.

I hope I've answered your questions, Bill. So, in other words, I've not really allowed the car idle when on the road to know if spew, boil, boil over would occur if idle. I've NEVER noticed the instrument panel light on during any time I'd think it should be on. When cranking for motor start, the light in fact lights.

I'll attach one of my most fav. pixs of the Mark. It was taken a year or so back. Even then I was having issue.

Regards, and again, thanks so much Bill.

PS, I hope you enjoy the pixs I've attached.

Darrell

mk v.jpg

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Hi Darrell -

From your description of the parts that were replaced to correct the overheating and loss of coolant it appears that you have covered all of the bases . I also notice that you state that the radiator was replaced prior to your purchase of the vehicle. This suggests that someone was addressing an overheating or a loss of coolant issue at that time. Since you don't say if anyone has tried to diagnose the problem when it occurs and I am not there of course at the time I will give you a "laundry list" of possibilities for you or your mechanic to consider. These suggestions are based on our experiences at Lincoln Land with these conditions.

Coolant strength may be too weak

The thermostat could be installed upside down

The rad. cap could be incorrect or defective.

Engine timing could be incorrect.

The cooling flex fan could be installed backwards ( these 400 cid engines had a 5 blade - 18 ½ inch diameter blade )

The radiator ( even if new or newly re-cored ) could be incorrect, faulty or woefully undersized.

Internal engine gasket problems

As I stated above Darrell these are only suggestions and possibilities. In cases such as this we sometimes need to backtrack and carefully consider that there may be problems with some of the work that was previously performed. If all of the above is "correct" in all respects then and only then the engine should be inspected by a good known engine technician for an internal problem. I do hope that this helps you and turns out to be an easy repair.

Sincerely,

Bill

August 15, 2011

1989 Town Car Poor Acceleration

Bill -

1989 Lincoln Town Car. Starts and runs rough. Gas smell under hood, believe it is fuel injector o rings, but don't think that is my biggest problem. Can get response from gas pedal in park, but in drive poor acceleration. Little or very slow response from engine, even when pedal to floor in drive gear. New plugs, wires, fuel pump, fuel filter is one year old. Any suggestions?? Starts all the time, but may have to push pedal to the floor to start in morning.

Gerard

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Gerard -

Any fuel leaks are a priority as they can sometimes become dangerous in a very short period of time. Not knowing the history of your engine and because it has a sophisticated for its day "computerized engine management system" you will need the correct diagnostic equipment to pinpoint your problem. There are several sensors and controls as well as an EGR valve on your engine that may cause part or all of these symptoms and sometimes there can of course be more than one system failure.

For the above reasons I hesitate to hazard a guess that may send you down the wrong trail and strongly advise that you seek out a good Tune Up shop in your locality. In the long run you may be $s ahead. If you do require any parts, manuals or any further information do not hesitate to contact us.

Bill

1979 Mark V Ignition Module Questions

Bill,

Looking for some info for my uncle. He has 79 Mark V that has been sitting for years due to needing a new ignition module. He picked one up and installed it but is still having issues. He says that he only gets spark AFTER he releases the key (starter). He recalls this happening in the past, but the car would catch and start. He called me for some ideas and it seems that the info on these cars is pretty limited. Was this a common issue with these vehicles? If not, do you have any suggestions for troubleshooting? Also, are there any manuals available?

Thanks,

Teresa

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Hi Teresa -

I wish that I had a nice niece that could fix my cars. Based on the information from your uncle that the ignition system has spark Only when the key is released and assuming that the correct ignition parts have been installed, the circuit should be carefully tested using the appropriate wiring diagram. This condition is not unheard of but is not a very common problem. The culprit can usually be found in a wiring connector or the ignition switch etc. and for this reason the wire that sends power from the ignition switch to the ignition system in the Start (cranking) position must be tested in a logical sequence until the fault is found.

We do have the proper wiring diagram and or manuals available at Lincoln Land and can arrange for them to be mailed to your address. Ask for George or Chris when ordering as they are aware of your situation. I do hope that the above helps and I commend you on your accurate description of the problem on your uncle's Mark V.

Sincerely,

Bill

July 28, 2011

1965 AC Kicks In And Out - Update

Hello Bill -

I found the 20 amp breaker were you said it was and it is tripping out so i tried another breaker and it runs longer but still kicks out.I notice that there is a lite blue with red runner with the brown wire should this be there.Also since the breaker is kicking out this means to much amps is this right and what amps should i be seeing from the blower motor and then the AC compressor or is there some thing else i should check first that can cause problem.Also the black power wire is warm to touch and you said it can be ignition switch and the switch stud off the back of switch is warm to hot.please advise.

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Ron -

Slightly warm wires are o/k. Any wiring that becomes hot should be investigated. Since you have stated that the breaker only blows with the blower on high the blower could be drawing too many amps. If you have the equipment as well as the knowledge and want to do a draw test on the circuit, that test could be done at the breaker to the brown wire and the blue wire with the red tracer. I don't have a wiring diagram for that blue/red wire but it is possible that it is correct. Perform the draw test at that point with the a/c on and the blower on high. The breaker is 20 amps so the total amperage draw should not exceed 20 amps. If it does exceed or is close to 20 amps unplug the compressor clutch coil and recheck the draw. On start up the blower will draw 7-9Amps, then drop to 3-4Amps maximum while running. If it is still high turn the blower speed to a slower speed. By unplugging and controlling the load in certain combinations you may be able to isolate the excess power draw. I trust that you did install a New and not used breaker.
Hope this helps.

Sincerely,

Bill

July 25, 2011

1965 AC Kicks In And Out

Hey Bill -

I have a 65 Lincoln Continental I have been putting together and now I am getting the AC working and if the AC is on and the fan is on high the fan kicks out and compressor stops running. I can turn blower speed fan switch to low and go back to high and it works again then kicks out again. If I leave on low AC keeps running OK I can unplug compressor and run the fan on high and will not kick off. The compressor is new and don't know what amps the blower motor needs to be at on high. Then say it has a circuit breaker instead of fuse but don't know were this is at to see if it is kicking out and resetting. Have you seen this concern.

Ron -

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Hi Ron -

I agree with you on your diagnosis and that the circuit breaker is a good place to start testing. Use a 12v test light on each side of the breaker contacts when the a/c "cuts out" to find out if the breaker has actually failed. There are of course other possibilities such as too high a power draw from the blower or clutch coil but there is a good and better chance that the breaker has "fatigued" and will need to be replaced. This breaker feeds the a/c and heater circuit with a Brown wire and one Black Wire will be located behind the right kick panel inside the car. Test this breaker carefully and accurately as I have indicated and replace it if necessary with a new one. If the breaker tests o/k and does not open when the system cuts out the next step will be to test the blower switch as the a/c clutch power passes through this switch as well as the blower speeds. The whole a/c heater circuit receives power from the ignition switch and it also is a candidate for failure. In any case starting at the Circuit Breaker is a good any easy place to start. Please let us know how this works out for you and if any further advice, literature or parts are needed please contact us as needed.

Sincerely,

Bill -

July 18, 2011

77 Mark V Follow Up And New Questions

Bill -

I'm finishing up with my previous E-mail message to you about my Mark V stalling on the highway then restarts in a couple of minutes. Well................all of my electrical components were replaced, leaving just the fuel system to worry about. Before I spent the money on a fuel pump pressure test, however, I replaced the fuel filter. The old one seems to be ok (I could blow through it). Today I pulled my car out of storage after 4 years and drove it from Ocean Shores, WA to Tacoma, WA without any stalling problem. That Mark V is an absolute joy to drive.......one of my best cars of my life - ever.

Thanks for your advice Bill.

Tom -

P.S. Two more questions:

(1) Headlight covers will pop up after sitting awhile. Where is the usual vacuum leak located at?

(2) Although my front chairs will recline and straighten up.......and the lumbar system works as does all the other switches on my arms consoles..............neither seat will move forward or backwards. Apparently the same fuse control all systems...........so apparently this is not a fuse problem. Why then will my seats - both the driver & passenger seat - not move forward nor backwards?

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Hi Tom -

The vacuum headlamp cover system and its problems has been explained at length in several previous blog posts. The causes of failures can be more than one, so you can use the search feature on the blog to locate them.

As for the seats not working "fore and aft" or "front and rear tilt" etc. the problem "usually and commonly" turns out to be caused by dried out lubricant inside the seat transmissions etc. Sometimes these transmissions and gears can be TEMPORARILY freed up by lightly tapping the side of a suspected component. While these items are not serviceable - we could supply you with a good used assembly if needed. Other problems have been found sometimes in the switches, wiring and the seat motor areas. If you will need any of our available information literature to help diagnose any of the above please contact us at any time. Hope that the above helps.

Sincerely,

Bill

79 Mark V Power Issues

Good Morning,

I saw your postings on the internet and hoping you can help me.

The car has 118,000 miles on it. Everything is still original but hadn't started for 2 years.

I put a battery and gas in and started right up, however the front seats would "click" when the doors were open, but nothing was moving.

The next day I drove down the street to run some gas through it and this is where my problem starts.

Car sputtered when I got on the gas, I cranked it back up and then it sputtered and did the same thing. Knowing I need to get a fuel filter and also rebuild the carburetor.

Well my problem now is the car doesn't get power. I disconnected the power from the battery and re-connected it. When I did this, I heard the drivers seat "click".

I turn the key in the "on position and I get all my dash lights and the door buzzer. As soon as I turn the key once more, the drivers seat "clicks" , I get no dash lights and the car does not turn over.

I then shut key off and try it again....but this time I get no dash lights, no nothing. I have to physically disconnect battery then connect it again to get the "dash lights and the click in the seat"...again car does not turn on.

I went and bought/installed a starter solenoid and voltage regulator and still I get the same problems.

Gary

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Hello Gary -

The click sound from the front seats sounds like the normal sound of the seat back release solenoids. When the door is opened this feature enables a rear seat passenger to easily fold the front seatback forward in order to enter the rear seat area.

Your power problem sounds like the classic bad battery cable connection, bad battery cable or bad battery. The existing poor connection is able to handle an electrical load up to a point and then it heats and disconnects and at that point you have "no power" any where until you reconnect the battery again. You can start by fully servicing the battery cable connections and at the same time examining the condition of the cables. A battery load test and condition test may be a good idea at this time as well. Hope this helps.

Sincerely,

Bill

July 7, 2011

1988 Town Car Engine Rattle

Hi Bill,

I have a 88 Lincoln Town Car .... Love it !

The problem I have is a little bizarre... When the engine gets hot, the engine rattles like hell. It almost sounds like a card in a bicycle wheel spoke. I have owned many cars and trucks and have worked on them all, but have never heard anything like this.

When the car cools down ..... it's like nothing ever happened. I have changed the water pump, thermostat, and cooling lines. My next step will be to flush the coolant system. My mechanic mentioned a retarding system in the ignition to help cool the engine down, but I have never heard of this... Any suggestions? I'd love to hear some.

Thanks,

Bill
Upstate NY

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Greetings Bill -

I have not heard of a noise such as you are describing as many strange sounds need to be heard in person in order to try to diagnose them correctly. You also do not say if the noise can be heard only at idle or while driving. From your letter though you seem to believe that it is making this sound only when hot and that the engine is overheating. An overheated engine can indeed make strange noises and should be repaired ASAP. if it is in fact overheating.

Not knowing the maintenance history of your car two important items to consider are the Thermostatic Clutch on the engine cooling fan and the Radiator itself. This clutch unit is well known to fail and many technicians have been fooled by a cooling fan that appears to be cooling properly but in fact is not turning fast enough as designed because of a bad clutch. Your Lincoln is also old enough at this point to possibly have a radiator that is partially plugged enough to cause overheating. A radiator that is thought to be in a plugged condition would need to be disassembled and cleaned or re-cored. I am not familiar with a retarding provision on that vehicle help to cool the engine.

If the above does not appear to help and if you can provide us with some more information we may be able to help with further advice etc.. We do have parts on hand that you may require so please feel free to contact us at your convenience.

Sincerely,

Bill

July 5, 2011

1972 Continental Headlamp & AC Issues

Hi Bill -

We just bought a 1972 Lincoln Continental, all original. In great condition!! Couple little fixes and one of them is that the headlamps stay open when you turn off the car and the AC seems to blow cold, but then shuts off and then spurts cold air again.

The mechanic I took it to says we need to replace the valve fast idle cam (someone else called it a vacuum manifold?) its a 9 port and he says it controls the entire vacuum system.

I have read some of your older posts and wanted your opinion, we're having trouble finding the part. May have located an original.

Are we in the right direction on the repair, or any other suggestions? and any recommendations on where to get this part, or its part number?

Donna
Mammoth Lakes, CA

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Hello Donna -

Nice car to have! They look great and command plenty of attention. These two issues that you describe are not related and my opinions will be based of course only on the information that you have provided.

If your mechanic has diagnosed the vacuum headlamp cover issue correctly he is referring to the vacuum distributor that is located on the firewall on the engine side. It contains a vacuum valve that functions to lock vacuum in the Headlamp Cover vacuum circuit when the engine is off or at times of low engine vacuum. This valve can fail. We should have that item in stock in good used condition. Be aware however that any vacuum routing in the circuit also may be at fault and there could be more than one leak.

Your description "the AC seems to blow cold then shuts off and then spurts cold again" sounds like one of the two relays on the engine side of the firewall or its connection has failed. The High Blower Relay will operate the blower at high speed until the A T C begins to moderate to a point that the relay will hand over the High blower speed to the automatic lower blower speeds. It is at that point that these relays are well known to fail internally. We will have these in stock or we offer a service to test and rebuild your relays.

Again, the above is based only on your information as well as what we encounter here at Lincoln Land on a daily basis. Further diagnosis may be necessary. If we can help you further with any of the parts or services as described above or if you may require any Shop Manuals for your 72 Lincoln please do not hesitate to contact us again at any time. We do hope that the above helps you with your repairs.

Sincerely,

Bill

June 29, 2011

1968 Continental Issues With Acceleration

Hey Bill -

My name is Alfred and I read your post and I still couldn't find the right one for me so I decided to ask my own question.

I own a 1968 Lincoln Continental with a 462 Engine. I'm having an issue with either the Carburetor or vacuum related. When I got the car it wasn't running, and had many leaks within the cooling system. The problem I'm having is that when the vehicle is being driven and I begin to accelerate, the car acts like it wants to die out and shut off.

It starts up great and idles fine. Please help me... I believe I might need a vacuum diagram for the car.

Sincerely,

Alfred

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Hi Alfred -

Welcome to the Blog. Those 68 Continentals are really great cars. I drive a real nice 68 coupe in Florida for several weeks in the winter. The car belongs to Chris Dunn's Dad. I drive it in order to exercise it and have any maintenance work performed on it that it may need.

When you receive one that isn't running as you describe there is a good chance that there could be many issues that need attention in the "tune up" and carburetion area etc. Not knowing the history of your Lincoln or how long it sat unused, I can offer the following areas as "starting" points. A complete tune up which would include Distributor points, Condenser, High Tension wiring, Vacuum Advance and Spark Plugs should be performed. A sharp hesitation on acceleration as you seem to be describing is an indication of a worn out accelerator pump within the Carburetor. This will likely lead to a carburetor overhaul and fuel delivery inspection. The above basic items are good places to start as they must of course be in top working order on any engine.

You also express a need for an engine area vacuum diagram, while there is not a specific one for your 68, we do offer the 67 version which will be the same for your 462. I highly recommend that you purchase a Shop Manual in addition, as these manuals pay for themselves in a short period of time. I hope that the above helps and If we can assist you further please do not hesitate to contact us at here at Lincoln Land.

Sincerely,

Bill

June 17, 2011

1978 Town Car Dash Light And Head Lamp Door Issues

Hey Bill,

I have a couple minor problems with my 1978, but the two I am most concerned with is one, I have no dash lights and the a/c-heat switches don't illuminate either. The gauges work fine just not the lights. I've checked the fuses and they are fine. Haven't checked the bulbs but I figured if it was the bulbs in the dash then the a/c-heat switches should still illuminate as well.

My second question is for some reason, when I shut the vehicle off the head light flaps close but when I start the car or turn the ignition on the headlight covers open up even when the lights are off, almost as if something is wired backwards or maybe something with the vacuum? Not sure its been this way since I've bought it which is approaching two years ago and I am not fixing the minor details. I would appreciate your help, thank you for your time.

Nick

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Hi Nick -

The seventies Lincolns had some very modern up to date lighting systems available for their owners. You don't tell us if your Lincoln has the optional "Autolamp" option or not. Autolamp is an automatic lighting option that turns the headlights, park lights and instrument lighting on at dusk and off at dawn. It is explained in your owners manual and the Shop Manual. The Shop Manual also explains the procedures to properly diagnose the systems. In any case it would be better for you to start the process with the Autolamp feature in the "off" position as the power for the dash lights originates from the Headlamp switch and its dimmer rheostat coil. We have previously posted some Headlight and Autolamp diagnostic ideas on our blog and George will reprint these or post the links here for you to read.

We are not sure if you intend to perform these diagnostic tests yourself Nick, but it would be well advised for you or your mechanic to do so with the proper wiring diagram and at least a good 12 volt test light on hand. At Lincoln Land we do these tests with the Shop Manual at our side. These manuals can save a lot of time and money.

I do hope that the above helps to guide you to a quick repair. If you need any further advice or literature etc. or if you would like us to test any of your lighting components for you here at Lincoln Land please do not hesitate to contact us further.

Sincerely,

Bill


P.S. Here are a few links to previous posts - you can always use the Search Function on Bill's Corner to find previous posts on a given topic - George @ Lincoln Land

http://www.lincolnlandinc.com/blog/2011/05/1985_town_car_autolamp_problem.html

http://www.lincolnlandinc.com/blog/2011/03/1978_town_car_autolamp_-_auto.html

http://www.lincolnlandinc.com/blog/2009/07/1978_mark_v_headlamp_vacuum_is.html

June 14, 2011

1963 Continenal Vapor Lock

Hi Bill,

I just read this Bill's Corner blog article and the problem described sounds familiar to me:

http://www.lincolnlandinc.com/blog/2010/08/1963_possible_vapor_lock_issue.html

My problem is that when cold, my '63 Continental Convertible starts fine; but after parking it for a while, it won't restart until the engine is fully cooled again.

My fuel pump was replaced a few years ago (the invoice shows an "FP 6848" as the part) and it is missing the heat shield as described in the blog post.

It is also missing a return vapor line to the fuel tank - only 2 of the 3 hoses are connected.

(I've attached a photo of the fuel pump in the engine compartment for reference)

I'm wondering whether I should:
1) order the parts necessary to install a return vapor line (I have no vapor discharge valve)
2) order a heat shield (though the screw positions don't look like they'd match the aftermarket pump I currently have installed)
3) order a whole new pump and
4) or something else?
Your advice is much appreciated!

Thanks
C.Y. Lee
1963 Lincoln Continental Convertible

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Hello C.Y. -

Is your engine cranking o/k when hot? If not the starter and battery circuits must be checked and brought up to par. If the engine cranks fine while hot or warm but will not start then some basic tune up items need to be inspected (during the non start event). A fuel pressure and flow test should be performed and corrected as required as well as a complete ignition system inspection and tune up may be in order. An ignition system that has not been "tuned up" for some time will certainly cause hot start problems.

All of the fuel lines and hose problems should of course be restored as you are suggesting but your problem should be diagnosed properly in a logical order as described above. This will prevent unnecessary replacement of parts and extra expense. Your issues could well involve some of the items as indicated in your Lincoln Land Blog link but correct diagnosis is half the battle. I hope that the above gets you started in the right direction. We are available for further advice or any parts that you might need for your repair.

Sincerely,

Bill

June 9, 2011

1969 Mark III Right Hand Mirror

Dear Bill,

I have a '69 Mk III that has a right side remote mirror. I sent off for a Marti report on the vehicle and it didn't turn up on the option list as they said it was not even available from Ford, nor was it included on the original invoice for the vehicle.

The right side mirror assembly looks identical to the left side mirror assembly on my vehicle, only shaped differently. A left side mirror assembly could not have been mounted on the right side since it does not have the same unique mirror housing shape and angled mounting base.

For the Mark III's, the mirror base sculpturing is a continuation of the upper side chrome trim molding that runs the entire length of the vehicle. The chrome fender trim on both sides of my vehicle has been manufactured (not cut) to accommodate both mirror bases.

Both mirror assemblies on my vehicle look to be the same age and are identical to one another as far as fading, pitting and general chrome condition.

A remote knob is installed on the right side armrest exactly in appearance and location as the remote knob on the left side armrest. The car is black with the gray interior and the right side remote knob assembly looks identical to the factory installed one on the left side armrest, not added.

If it was not an available option, then somebody manufactured a uniquely designed mirror housing, base, upper trim molding and remote knob with cable for the right side of that car only. If it was not originally invoiced but available as an option, then I suspect that the right side door had been replaced with one that came with the mirror and a gray door panel/armrest at some point in the past, although it sure does look like the original door.

Could you shed a little light on this mystery?


Thank you for your time,

Darren

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Hi Darren -

The right hand remote control mirror on the 1969 Mark III was indeed an option. Chris Dunn has advised me that he has seen it shown in the Dealer order catalogs. It was probably an item that was not overly promoted by Ford or the dealer sales people. This happens to some good factory options from time to time. The right hand remote mirror is a very desirable option to have on your Mark.

Al at Lincoln Land also reminded me that the left hand mirror can be dissassembled and reconfigured to serve as a right hand mirror. Many have done this and they work very well. If your mirror bodies are cast as solid left and right as you have stated please send us pictures and we will identify these for you. Enjoy your nice Mark III this summer.

Sincerely,

Bill

June 6, 2011

1957 Mark Brake Vacuum Noise

From time I purchased this car a loud air noise occurs when applying the brakes. The car drives and runs, under all conditions beautifully including stopping. Is this a problem that historically occurs in the booster at some point while not impacting brake functioning, and what might be the fix? My thanks to you and your great service to all of us.

Bob

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Hi Bob -

We are pleased that you are enjoying the forum as well as your lovely Mark II. The noise that you are describing sounds to me like a vacuum leak within the Bendix Treadlevac booster as it occurs according to your description only during brake application. Among several other suspect parts inside this booster there is a rubber vacuum hose that can expand or rupture and cause this hissing ( this has happened previously with my 54 Capri ). Not knowing the maintenance history of your car though the possibility also exists of course that perhaps the booster and cylinder assembly may be overdue for a general inspection and overhaul. We can if you wish make arrangements to do this for you or have it done for you from Lincoln Land. If you have no access to this service locally please contact us and deal with George or Chris as they are aware of your issue.

I hope that the above helps you to a speedy repair.

Sincerely,

Bill

May 31, 2011

1965 Overheating And Knocking

Hi Bill,

I have a 65 Continental with a 430. After driving around for a little while, the engine starts knocking while I accelerate. It doesn't do it at idle or while driving, just while accelerating, especially around turns.

I did do something stupid. I was showing the car off to a friend and left the A/C running while the engine was at idle. The car over heated, and I've noticed the knocking ever since then. The other problem I have is with over heating. The engine doesn't have a
shroud (original owner lied about not having it, long story), so I had a custom aluminum shroud with an 11" electric fan built. I thought that would take care of the over heating, but it operated exactly the same.

I have replaced the thermostat, but not the water pump, or radiator. I have ran water through engine and it comes out just fine, with no back pressure. I have also ran water through the radiator, again it flowed just fine. I'm considering replacing the radiator, thinking the inner workings of the radiator might be clogged up.

Any advice will be appreciated. I have numerous other issues, but those two are really
keeping me from enjoying driving Violet around. :)

Thank you for your help and your time.


Josh
Norman, OK

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Greetings Josh -

I'm sorry to hear about your recent engine problems. It does sound from your description that your engine has been under a lot of stress and has reacted accordingly. In my opinion the overheating condition should have been properly addressed at a much earlier date. The description of "engine knock" takes in a lot of territory and needs to be examined by a competent technician with the proper test equipment. We of course cannot determine from here if the knock is a carbon related knock, upper engine tap or perhaps an engine bearing knock therefore an on scene inspection and an accurate diagnosis is necessary.

If your engine is actually overheating and from your description it is, this issue must be addressed as soon as possible. When your Lincoln was delivered to the first owner the cooling system was capable of properly cooling the engine in any weather condition in any State in the U.S.A. I have always believed in maintaining the the original cooling system to an optimum condition in any vehicle. Any deviations such as you have done are o/k as a personal touch ONLY if it works and the other basic components are in GOOD shape. The other basic components consist of among other items the radiator, the water pump, fan blade and its clutch and the engine coolant passages. The radiator could easily be partially plugged up along with the engine coolant chambers. What you observe flowing through the radiator could well be only 40% of what a clean rad. is capable of passing and cooling. A good radiator shop can remove the end tanks and "rod out" the rad or "recore" it completely. I don't know what your fan shroud looks like but your mention of an 11" electric fan in my opinion is woefully undersized for that radiator and engine.

I hope that the above helps you get started on the road to recovery and if you need any original parts or specifications do not hesitate to contact us further.

Sincerely,

Bill

May 20, 2011

1985 Town Car Autolamp Update - Interior Trim Questions

Hi Bill,

Thanks for your response. The head lights do come on manually. I have a manual, however it was unclear to me as to the to the next step to getting the autolamp to work.

Another question I have on my 85 Town Car is the common problem of the interior door panels. Two of the door panels are just starting to crack due to age not wear. They make door overlays and the local upholstery guy would try to fix it. Please let me know what is your opinion on repairs for interior door panels.

Regards,

Scott

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Hi Scott -

If you have the FoMoCo shop manual the diagnosis is fairly well stated. Which manual do you have and what steps are unclear to you. We may be able to help with better factory information. Sometimes a trained eye is also needed to clear up certain diagnostic procedures. There is also a possibility that some of your "used" parts may be defective and they may need to be sent in to us for some tests.

We have been successful to a point with certain repairs to many interior trim panels. Would it be possible for you to send us pictures so that we can better assess yours? We also have a limited selection of good used ones that may prove to be a better choice for you.

Sincerely,

Bill

May 19, 2011

1985 Town Car Autolamp Problems

Hi Bill,

I have a 1985 Town Car Signature Series with 34,000 original miles.The auto-lamp doesn't work. I have replaced both relays on the fender well, one for the auto-lamp, and one for the auto hi-beam, and I checked the fuse. I replaced the headlight switch and found a couple photo cells in the junk yard and still it doesn't work. Please let me know if you have any suggestions.

Regards,

Scott

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Greetings Scott -

If all of those used parts that you have installed are in good working order, and you have replaced the correct relays and fuse etc., then you should perform the diagnosis as outlined in the Shop Manual.

Do the headlamps operate manually? The Manual suggests as a first step to turn the Autolamp switch to the Off position and to operate the headlamps manually. If they do not operate manually then you would need to check out the simpler manual non Autolamp circuit. If the headlamps operate OK manually, then you need to continue with the Autolamp diagnosis.

We may have the necessary diagnosis information available if you require it. I hope that the above helps you.

Sincerely,

Bill

May 17, 2011

1978 Mark Hard To Start When Cold

Hi Bill,

I have a '78 Mark V, with a 400 engine, from California. It has become very hard to start at times when cold. It will turns over fine. When trying to start I depress the pedal to the floor and slowly release as per the owners manual. The car almost starts but won't run. On the second attempt I have tried holding the pedal to the floor, 1/4 throttle and not depressing the throttle but no go. When I leave it for about an hour it fires up great without touching the pedal. It acts as though it is flooded but holding the pedal to the floor does not allow it to start. When warm it starts great and when it does start it runs fine. I have pulled the spark plugs out when it won't fire and they do smell of fuel. The plugs are correct as per the local Ford dealership. It has an electric choke. Does the choke need adjustment? It did start just fine, seldom on the first attempt but always on the second attempt. The ambient temperature has gone up since I bought the car, early spring temps were around 0-5 Celsius to 15-20 Celsius. Could this also be a factor?

Thanks,

Carman

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Hi Carman -

Welcome to the forum. The first check for this problem is to remove the air cleaner before a cold start and observe the cold choke operation while manually operating the accelerator linkage. The choke butterfly valve should snap closed to allow for a fast start with a rich mixture and then open slightly upon starting and continue to slowly open fully as the engine warms up. If the choke circuit is o/k and requires no repair then you must check to find out if you have fuel immediately available in the carburetor. If not, a fuel pump and fuel system test is in order.

For a cold engine we usually give the accelerator pedal a couple of quick pumps to set the choke, the fast idle and to pump some fuel through the carb for a rich mixture and a fast start. Assuming that your ignition and other" tune up" components are in good order you must also have the proper choke and fuel operation as described above. I hope that the above helps you to future quick starts.

Sincerely,

Bill

1977 Mark V Engine Dies Out

Hello Bill -

I have a 1977 Lincoln Mark V which I have stored in my garage for several years, stopped driving it because all of a sudden the car developed a problem when traveling down the road then its engine would die. I have replaced all the electrical components.............wires, cap, rotor, modular, coil............not the condenser.....yet I still have the same problem. I will pull off to the side of the road..............then the engine will start up after a couple of minutes. Then drive a while longer until it once more dies.

What else can I replace in the electrical system that would eliminate this problem? This is NOT a CA car.

Thanks for your advice,

Tom

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Hi Tom -

The 77 Mark V is usually a reliable car and when these kinds of problems appear it is difficult to find a technician who is well versed in the all areas under the hood. I believe that the key for your repair lies with a correct diagnosis. Your description of a good running engine that suddenly quits and then restarts in that manner could have a fuel or ignition problem. If it is a fuel problem you or your mechanic should suspect a fuel delivery problem to the carburetor and a good place to start is at the fuel pump with a fuel pressure and volume test. Assuming though that you are correct and that the problem is in the ignition system you should be aware that your Mark has a very reliable solid state electronic ignition set up that was considered state of the art in 1977. These systems can and do fail with age and use. The system consists of electronic components that are located inside the distributor and under the hood at the fender apron area. The operation and diagnosis is described in the Shop Manuals.

Again Tom, the key here is to get an accurate diagnosis in your location performed by a good technician to avoid replacing items that do not need to be replaced. If we can help you further with advice or parts please do not hesitate to call on us.

Sincerely,

Bill

May 6, 2011

1979 Continental Hot Start Issues

Hello Bill,

I have a 79 Continental Collector Series W/ the 400. After the engine is at operating temp and I let her sit for a few minutes, when I go to restart her I get the (RA RA RA) slow turn over like it's either too hot or the timing is too far advanced or maybe a problem with the starter. I have replaced the starter,battery, checked the temp with a digital thermometer, checked the cables. Checked the timing and just recently the timing chain and gears. ( Motor has over 200,000 I'm sure and it was very loose) I thought for sure this was my problem but alas it's the same as before. I have over 30 tears as a professional mechanic but this has got me stumped. Other than that she runs just fine. Please help.

Thanx,

Jim

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Hello Jim,

Welcome to our blog. Some of those slow cranking hot start conditions can be a real pain. The vehicles of the seventies were just getting started with fancy ignition and engine controls and were evolving constantly. You stated that you have a new battery, starter and that the cables are o/k. I would first want to make absolutely sure that the battery is the correct size for that 400 cid engine and that is fully charged and PROPERLY load tested. The starter as well should be tested HOT for a high draw and the cables and any engine ground straps should be carefully re-inspected. I know that you believe that all of the above is o/k BUT new parts do fail and if by chance something simple with the above is missed or ignored you may be led down some expensive and time consuming path.

Another item to consider is the base timing. Dampers on some engines are known to slip on their rubber internals which then can cause a wrong timing reading. If your engine was over advanced, hard hot cranking and starting could be a result. The original FoMoCo DURASPARK ignition and engine management on that engine was designed carefully for that engine along with several sensors and vacuum items. All of these management parts contribute to the operation of the engine. If you do remove or bypass any items or replace any electronics with aftermarket parts, you should be careful with choice of brand name and know what you are doing.

You also state Jim that your engine has over 200,000 miles on it. I would be interested to know what the engine oil pressure is with the engine at HOT operating temperature. I hope that the above suggestions help and that you find something simple. If you are still having problems, post back to us with that Hot oil pressure if it is low and I will tell about the strange hot start problem and repair that I had to do on my 70 Sedan.

Sincerely,

Bill

May 4, 2011

Questions On Removing Trim On A 1973 Continental

Hi Bill,

My name is Steve. I want to have my '73 Lincoln Continental repainted ,and I'm removing all the chromed stuff from the exterior. I'm struggling with the headlight covers and the "CONTINENTAL" letters on the front. The book does not mention how to remove them.I could use a little help.

Thanks for all that you're doing for us, Lincoln fans here on this site.

Steve

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Hi Steve,

If the book that you are referring to is the owners manual, it will not show how the various mouldings are attached. The Factory maintenance manual however shows how most of the mouldings and scripts are attached. This is shown on page 47-02-01 of the volume 4 body manual. The Mark IV is also shown.

The "letters" are attached with barrel clips in the header panel. The headlamp doors are removed by unscrewing the two hex nuts on the pivot arms of the doors, once removed, they should pull straight out.

If you are in need of the proper manuals for your car, we can arrange for a set to be sent out to you. The correct manuals usually pay for themselves during the first repair.

Sincerely,

Bill

1978 Town Car Blower Issues

Hi Bill,

I have two beauties. A 1979 Town Car in need of some body work, and a 1978 that's as close to perfect for a 33 year old survivor. When I got the 79, the blower motor only worked on high, and after some research, I found it was as simple as the air conditioner fuse. Replaced it, and she blew as cold as she could, at all speeds.

My problem is I just bought the 78 and same issue. I figured "no problem. Replace the fuse when I get her home, and she'll work". Nope. No go. I did not have a circuit tester, so I swapped out the under hood/firewall mounted resisters and tested. Still only high fan. Have you seen this before? Could the issue be with the fuse box?

Perplexed,

Marc

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Hi Marc -

Your blower problem is a common complaint item on many cars as they age. The most common failure in the blower circuit on your Lincoln is the High Blower Relay or its connections which are located under the hood on the firewall.

At Lincoln Land we would usually start diagnosing in this easy to access area. When the high speed is engaged it sends battery power direct to the blower through a fuse link. When the lower speeds are selected the relay hands off the circuit to its lower contacts and the blower switch and resistor circuit. A test light and a shop manual are usually a requirement to quickly diagnose this circuit. If necessary we can rebuild these relays for you. Let us know if you need any further advice or possibly a set of shop manuals for this and any future repairs.

Sincerely,

Bill

April 27, 2011

No Heat In The 87 Town Car

Hi Bill -

I have one more question - I have a 1987 Lincoln Town Car and my uncle and dad decided to change my heater core because it started leaking. Now I don't have heat anymore.

Thanx,

Bret

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Hi Bret -

Sorry to hear that you have lost your heat after the heater core replacement. Some of those heater core repair jobs can be frustrating. I will assume that you had OK heater operation prior to the core change and will base my answer on that assumption.

It is unlikely but not impossible that another component has failed during the heater core change. The Temperature Control Sensor could have locked up in the full cool position and is causing the air to bypass the heater core but in my opinion this would be possible but not very likely. The engine thermostat could have stuck in the open position and is now causing the engine coolant to be overcooled. This has happened before. If the no heat problem was in fact caused during the Heater core replacement, then the fault lies with one of two things. The core itself is wrong/faulty or an error in re- assembly occurred. If a "used" core was installed it may be plugged. Vacuum lines may be re-installed incorrectly under the dash or the coolant level is low or air locked.

If what you are describing is only a loss of blower "fan" in the HEAT position and you have blower fan in the other control lever positions, this is usually caused by a failed Cold Engine Lockout sensor that is located in one of the heater hoses under the hood.

Their is no mechanic in the world that has not needed to occasionally "backtrack" or "double check" his work on a job to correct an error that occurred during his repair. I hope that the above suggestions help you and should you need any further help, repair parts or manuals please do not hesitate to contact us at any time.

Sincerely,

Bill

April 12, 2011

1987 Town Car Cutting Off While Running

Hi, Bill -

I have a 1987 Lincoln Town Car I have changed the water pump, starter, fuel pump, fuel filter, and the battery. I can drive it only for 30 minutes, and it will cut off on me but when I first got last year it never did. I really need your professional help because I do not want to sell it.

Bret

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Hi Bret -

This is not an uncommon problem for us, but of course it is quite troublesome when it occurs to you on the road. Not knowing all of the details in your case though I can offer the following based on our experiences at Lincoln Land.

The sudden shut off of the engine is usually caused by a failed electronic ignition component at or inside the distributor. The electronic ignition that was used on your era of Lincoln is an excellent design but age and use causes these components to eventually break down.

George Miller here at Lincoln Land has also offered that he had a similar problem with his that proved to be caused by the ignition switch itself.

Another possibility to consider is a sudden and intermittent fuel delivery loss that is caused by a failing fuel pump, or its electrical circuit.

In any case and in the interest of time and frustration, the system has a problem that needs to be diagnosed properly by a competent experienced technician at a local "automotive tune up shop" so that only the faulty part is replaced. I hope that the above helps you on the path to a speedy repair.

Sincerely,

Bill

April 4, 2011

1969 Mark III Questions

Bill -

My Mark III will not change from defrost, to heat, to dash vents, and I cannot turn heat off. Also noticed the rear vents will not operate. Can you give me some direction and what parts I should check for proper operation, and do you have these parts? Do you have a repair manual for my car? I would love to visit sometime!

Thanks,

Marv

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Hi Marv -

Very nice car and welcome to the Lincoln Land blog. We certainly would be pleased if you could visit our showroom and warehouse in Clearwater. You would be able to meet us and to see some very nice Lincolns and FORD literature that we have for sale and on display for fellow Lincoln lovers.

The description of your a/c problem sounds 99% like a classic loss of vacuum to the Climate Control and the Flo Thru rear vent systems. Loss of vacuum will cause the system to drive and default to full defrost and max. heat with the fan at high speed. The rear vent will also become inoperative at the same time. The Shop Manual set is very explicit on these complicated systems and is an absolute must in order to quickly diagnose the vacuum and electric features of all 1969 FoMoCo vehicles. If you wish, we can arrange to have a set sent to your address. I hope that the above helps and if you need any further advice or any parts to correct your problem please do not hesitate to contact us at any time.

Sincerely,

Bill

March 25, 2011

1978 Continental Sedan Hard To Start

Bill -

To start my Lincoln, I have to pump the foot feed to get it started. After that it, starts OK. No big problem but would like to start after a pump or two. Thanks for any help.

Ray

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Hello Raymond -

Any cold engine that requires excessive accelerator pumping in order to start needs to have the carburetor choke inspected first for proper operation. When the engine is cold the choke valve (aka butterfly valve) should be closed tight to provide a rich mixture for starting. Upon starting the valve will open a small preset amount to lean out the fuel mixture and then continue to open slowly to the fully open position as the engine warms up. The choke on a cold engine will operate in this fashion in a cold, hot or warm climate. If the above does not occur you will then need to correct the choke circuit as required as per the shop manual. Of course all other basic engine ignition and fuel items must be in good operating order as well. I hope the above leads you or your mechanic to a speedy repair.

Sincerely,

Bill

March 22, 2011

1969 Mark III Oil And Coolant Leaks

Hello Bill,

I know you're a whiz at this Lincoln stuff!!! A couple years ago, you solved an A/C Relay issue on my '89 TC while I was down in Clearwater visiting!!

I have a 1969 Mark which has a couple mysterious leaks which I cannot find the root cause for.

One is an oil leak, which leaks only after I shut the engine off, and only a couple drops, but enough so that I can't park the car in the driveway. It appears to be coming from between the Power Steering pump and front cover. I do have the seal installed correctly, put in place from the front of the cover, and the seal is brand new.

The other is an antifreeze leak which is allowing a small amount of coolant to pool in the valley (at the top) of the front cover, which leads me to believe its the front cover gasket.

All this being said, the engine was completely rebuilt last year and every gasket, seal, component is BRAND NEW.

Any insight would be greatly appreciated.

Thanks,

Dan K.

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Greetings Dan -

Any of these kinds of leaks can sure be annoying and some can be tough to find. The oil leak can be easier to locate if you clean the area completely and then observe that location after shutting off a hot engine. There is a need to determine if the oil leak is engine oil or power steering fluid, of course it is best seen with the front end of the vehicle raised if possible. The front cover to power steering pump seal is best inserted into the cover clean, dry and coated with a good contact adhesive on the front cover side that dries quickly and completely. We highly recommend this procedure.

The coolant leak must be correctly diagnosed as well in order to not misdiagnose and end up dismantling assemblies that do not leak. Coolant leak areas should be closely observed with both a cold and a warm engine. Ideally the use of a cooling system pressure tester is best used to pinpoint the suspected areas. These testers provide the necessary pressure to diagnose without starting the engine. A good radiator shop should be able to do this procedure for you.

Always remember that ACCURATE diagnosis is half the battle. We hope that the above helps of course if we can help further with any parts or advice etc. please contact us further.

Sincerely,

Bill

March 21, 2011

1987 Town Car AC Questions

Hi Bill,

Thanks for all of your good work on this very interesting blog. Thought I would jump in with a question on my 1987 Town Car. While out on its Spring shakedown run I noticed that the climate control system was not working in the "FLOOR" position (no fan operation) even with the engine fully warmed up. The system works perfectly (air temp is fine and fan operation is fine) on all other settings (for example, I can get plenty of hot air to the floor in the "MIX" setting). Any thoughts? Is there something specific I should be looking for?

Many thanks,

Garry

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Greetings Garry -

Welcome to our blog. Your no "FLOOR" air delivery situation is a common and annoying problem. In 99.9% of the time this is caused by an unplugged or failed CELO (cold engine lock out) or also known as TBL (thermal blower lockout). This unit is located in one of the heater hoses under the hood and its electrical function is to prevent blower operation in the FLOOR position until the engine coolant reaches a predetermined temperature so as to preclude unpleasant cold air delivery until the heater is able to provide heated air as required.

The two heavy wires at this sensor can be jumped together to eliminate the "LOCKOUT" feature which will allow for immediate blower turn on at any engine temperature or the unit can be replaced in order to maintain the full Climate Control function. If you have any further questions or if you would like us to arrange for the new part to be sent to your address please contact us at your convenience. We hope this helps you an thanks for joining our blog.

Sincerely,

Bill

March 15, 2011

1970 Continental Modulator Pin

My 1970 Lincoln Sedan's C6 transmission switches gears a bit late. The 2-3 gear shift occurs normally as soon as the gas pedal is released, then acceleration can be resumed.

I have changed the modulator and made sure the downshift linkage was not at fault. No
change. The only remaining sources for this problem are the following: vacuum leak, worn seals, but there is also this: there was no metal rod (pin) in the modulator housing
when I changed it.. could this explain the problem? If so, do you sell this part?

I have some 1/8" steel wire, can I simply make a rod of this exact length? Second, I have this excerpt from a ford manual which says to "adjust the modulator to average weight" (its spring tension), is this indeed necessary? I don't know if my 1970 C6 has a shift kit however.

F.P.

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F P -

The pin is indeed vital for the modulator to operate and fits many many years of c6. The original p/n is C4AZ-7A380-A. It is 1"11/16 long and 1/8" thick. If you can't find one in your area we could supply one if necessary. Let us know and ask for Chris if you call as he is aware of this reply.

We don't make those pins here as you are thinking of doing because of course we have plenty from our parts cars. They don't break, shrink, rot, rust or burn out, etc. Therefore a used one is as good as a new one. It is too small and inexpensive a part to quibble over and discuss making one. You say that you do not know if your 70 Lincoln has a shift kit or not. We also do not this and I can't imagine anyone ever wanting to install one on a 1970 Lincoln. The real BOTTOM LINE here is that if yours is actually missing this pin as you say it is, just get one, install it and road test the car. If the pin makes it shift properly, great, you are done. If not then then you move on to the next step from there.

Sincerely,

Bill

March 10, 2011

1971 Mark III Aftermarket Carburetor Issues

Hello Bill -
I have a 1971 Mark III, when I purchased it, it had a Edelbrock carburetor on it and a spacer plate that looked like maybe it came from a t bird (aluminum with a rear tube and coolant pipe tube running through it on the right side). I purchased a 4300 carburetor and want the OEM spacer that belongs on the car now with the correct gaskets on top and below the spacer, a stud kit and stud for carburetor with correct wingnut. It looks like the OEM spacer was in the trunk but with a broken nipple end on the rear, this one was not aluminum and with just one nipple in the middle rear. I am guessing this is the correct setup, the nipple in the rear of the spacer is for the PCV valve hose is it not? Would it be the same if you connected the PCV valve hose to the nipple in the rear of the auto lite 4300 carburetor? If not what is the original set up for these fittings? I really would like a vacuum diagram for the engine compartment on this car the Ford-Lincoln manual I have really doesn't show vacuum routing diagrams on this 460 any way these parts I mentioned would help out great and also the choke heating tube gasket the tubes that come out of the assembly on the outside that are bolted to the intake manifold are two pipes that are broken off or cut at about 4 inches long. The pipe that is inside the manifold is fine and in good condition and I'm guessing one goes to the choke connector and the other one goes to the under side of the air filter assembly correct me if I'm wrong and I would like to know if this car or carburetor 4300 came with a dashpot for anti stalling I'm not sure on that either. I am a auto and truck mechanic just not a Lincoln Mark III mechanic LOL if that matters . Thanks so much for your time in advance.

Paul

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Hi Paul -

Welcome to the forum and congrats on your 71 Mark purchase. At Lincoln Land we see these carburetion modifications from time to time, but we don't really endorse them to any extent because of their inconclusive success history regarding gas mileage and or performance satisfaction etc. Almost all of our customers because of the nature of the Lincoln automobile hobby prefer to restore or maintain their vehicles to original.

At the present time, we do not have a car that we can photograph the details of the engine topside for you. If you have the Ford shop manuals you have the same information that we have. I can confirm that the original carburetor was a Ford 4300 and that it did have an anti-stall dash pot at the left front mounting stud. If you would like to send us some pictures of what you presently have on your engine and/or would like to discuss acquiring the original carburetion and emission parts, please contact us further and mention your blog inquiry as a reference.

Sincerely,

Bill

March 7, 2011

1978 Town Car Autolamp - Auto Dim Questions

Hello Bill,

I have a 1978 Lincoln Town Car I recently purchased that has a 2 part problem with the Automatic Headlight Dimmer/Delay system. The first is the autolamp feature, when turned on, regardless of the position of the switch for the delay, the headlights never turn on, but the parking lights and instrument panel do, but turn off instantly, no delay, when the ignition switch is turned off. The second is with the automatic dimmer, when it detects oncoming light it will put the lights in low beam but does not return the high beams back most of the time. What do you think?

Dave

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Greetings Dave -

Congratulations on your recent Lincoln purchase. The popular Autolamp and Automatic Dimmer options are a real nice luxury option to have but of course can be a real pain when they fail. The diagnostic procedures are very well presented in the Factory Shop Manual and would be a great item for you to have now and in the future. Without being there on site to actually diagnose the system for you I can only at this time offer you some of the problems that we have encountered with them here at Lincoln Land.

If the parking lamps and instrument lamps are turned on Automatically as you describe but the Headlamps are not, this is usually caused by a bad connection or contact located inside the Amplifier module. Of course any wiring involved in that circuit can also be suspect. This is the reason that a proper wiring diagram as shown in the manual is a real plus in order for you to troubleshoot and pinpoint your problem.

The Automatic Headlamp Dimmer system is notorious for developing failed Amplifier Sensor units that are located behind the left headlamp assembly. This unit is completely sealed and not repairable. Again the tests for this option are well shown in the manual.

I do hope that the above helps and if you do require any manuals, parts or further information. please do not hesitate to contact us at any time.

Sincerely,

Bill


1979 Mark V Wiper Questions

Bill -

I'm enjoying your blog and have a question for you,,, My 79 Mark V has a wiper problem, I have bought another wiper motor and intermittent switch, is there anything else, like a timer box, that I may need to get the wipers working???

Thanks,

Mike

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Hello Mike -

We at Lincoln Land are real pleased that you are enjoying the blog. Your intermittent wiper system does indeed include an Electronic Control Module that is located under the dash and is in line with the Wiper Control Switch. Although this module is very well known to cause a problem such as you are describing we don't ever recommend to just "keep on replacing parts" without making the tests as shown in the Shop Manual. Of course we realize that if you do not have a manual or the necessary equipment etc. this may be the only way for you to proceed at this time. Other problem points to consider are as follows..... a poor ground circuit, an unplugged connector or a bad contact etc. somewhere that is causing the wiper system to receive no power at all.

Having said all of the above Mike, my hunch is that the above module is faulty as you already suspect. We can arrange at any time for one to be sent to your address whenever you are ready and if you need any further advice etc. in this matter please contact us at any time.

Sincerely,

Bill

March 3, 2011

1971 Mark III Transmission Fluid Change

Hi Bill -

I am busy replacing the oil of my transmission, and to do this in a correct way they told me to also empty the converter. I have removed the cover plate on the front of the transmission so I can see the converter. I turned the converter a couple times to look for a plug or something what looks like a plug . Now I saw something that looks like some kind of a plug , it is very small (smaller than the normal bolts on the converter) and it has a square type of bolt . It does not look like a normal bolt with 6 sides, this only has 4 sides (square). Is this the plug I need to empty the converter? I hope you can help me.

Best regards

Ray
The Netherlands

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Ray -

Excellent idea to drain the converter as well as the pan. This image is from our 66 manual and will show you the orientation of the drain plug. Although the drain plugs that we see are six sided and requiring a 7/16" wrench, yours could indeed be square. We hope that this information helps you.


Sincerely,

Bill

View image

February 22, 2011

1968 Continental Engine Questions

Hey Bill,

I was curious if you could help me out.

I have a 460 7.5L engine in my 1968 Lincoln Continental. The issue is, when I try to start it up it barely turns over. When it does try to turn over it blows white smoke out of the carburetor.

I can't figure it out. I changed the spark plugs and wires, checked the distributor cap and rotor and its fine. Any other ideas you might have?

Thanks,

Christian

***************************************************************************************************************


Hi Chris -

Welcome to the Lincoln Land blog. I am confident that we can help you out but first we would need some further information. When an engine is not starting at all it is important for us to know how long that it has been since it last ran and also what was the running condition when it was last running.

In any case, in order for an engine to start it requires a proper fuel and air mixture, a good strong spark at the exact time to the correct cylinder along with reasonable compression and a good strong battery and starter. Without knowing the answers regarding the above and the history of your engine it would be difficult to pinpoint your problem but I can offer the following possibilities ...... Poor or no fuel delivery at all to the carburetor, old deteriorated fuel that will not ignite, inoperative choke, or your tune up adjustments such as firing order, etc. may be out of adjustment in addition to any of the above. The timing chain could have slipped a tooth or two rendering proper timing impossible. Any one or more of the above will contribute to a "non start condition" and I do hope that your problem turns out to be an easy to correct repair for you. If the above possibilities do not help, please supply us with more information as described above and we may be able help further to diagnose your problem.

Sincerely,
Bill

February 11, 2011

1979 Mark V Issues

Hi Bill,

From browsing your blog, it seems like you are as close to an expert on Lincoln's as can be. recently I bought a 1979 Mark V. The driver's door lock is frozen and the key will not turn it. The knob inside will lock the door however. My thinking is it's the cylinder. The question I have is with that light thing on the outside of the door that's supposed to light the keyhole at night. I have the interior panel off but am reluctant to try to take the lock cylinder out as i cannot see how its connected or works with that light. Is the cylinder attached to the light or is this a special cylinder that has the light built into it? The previous owner left the shop manual and it tells how to take out a conventional lock cylinder, but it makes no mention of the light.

Also, another problem you might be able to point me in the right direction on is when either car door is opened, I hear a soft clicking every few seconds, I noticed the knob on the seat back jiggles with each click. Do you have any idea what this is all about? Seems like a lot of people on your blog have electrical problems with their Lincolns. Hopefully you will have come across these couple I have here. Well, I would appreciate you emailing me any info you may have on the above things.

Thanks,

Robert

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Robert -

I have consulted with our technicians regarding your problems and have found out the following. The lighted door lock cylinder assembly is removed in the same manner as a conventional non lighted one (as your manual describes) but with the addition that you must disconnect the electrical connector at the unit. Therefore, if you have determined that the cylinder has become seized and that the key that you have used is correct for the ignition cylinder and the other door cylinder then you should remove it and have a locksmith repair it for that key.

The cycling action of your seat back release solenoids has historically proven to us to be caused possibly by faulty solenoids. However if both sides are cycling when their door is opened I would test for a voltage drop in the system at the battery or any relay or switch involved. Our technician also has advised me that the Shop Manual describes the test procedure for these Automatic Seat Back release systems. Your manual if it is the correct FoMoCo shop manual should also show this for you. If you need any further info. etc. please do not hesitate to contact us.

Sincerely,

Bill

February 8, 2011

1979 Town Coupe Power Window And Locks Issues

Bill -

I just purchased this car and the power door locks and windows do not work. Finding it hard to believe that all the motors went at once, I ordered a new safety relay. Fuses were good and other items on the circuit work (such as power trunk). I installed the relay and once I plugged it in it clicked telling me it is energized. At the drivers door there is power at the switch. Where do I go from here?

Bill

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Hi Bill -

Congratulations on your recent purchase. These 79 Town Cars are great luxury cars and usually provide years of premium service ......if they are maintained. If however they are not maintained when problems arise these problems only add up and need to be dealt with eventually. From your description, it appears that your window and door lock failures probably occurred not all at once but slowly over a period of time.

I would initially approach both the window problem and the power door lock problem from the driver's door switches with the CORRECT wiring diagram and a Test Light. You will be tracing the Power path for each outage to determine if a switch, motor or solenoid is at fault. Proper diagnosis is imperative. Common failures of these two accessories are as follows: any wiring, switches, window motors and gears and door lock solenoids.

We hope that this will help get you started and if you do need any manuals or parts etc., for your Lincoln, do not hesitate to contact us further.

Sincerely,

Bill -

January 24, 2011

1991 Transmission update - and another problem

Bill,

The problem I had with the transmission on my 1991 Lincoln was that it was shot. I found a transmission at a wrecking yard, the used transmission was rebuilt by Ford. I had it put on the car, and it works fantastically.

Now I have to work on the front end air suspension. The car sits higher on the passenger side, than it does on the drivers side and the passenger front tire seems to bottom out when I hit potholes.. Any idea on what I should try with this issue? Thanks for your advise,

Lincoln
Ogden, UT

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Hi Lincoln -

Maintaining the nice Lincoln ride and steering is important to most of us Lincoln enthusiasts. If your Lincoln has the 4 wheel air suspension it is computer controlled and requires some advanced suspension knowledge and diagnostic equipment. The first item on your list if you wish to embark on your own repair is to obtain and study the correct FoMoCo shop manual for this vehicle in order to form a plan. These manuals pay for themselves in a short time. Keep in mind also that all of the other suspension and steering items should be inspected at this time as well. Contact us if you would like the correct manual or any parts etc. that we may have for you to complete the repair.

Sincerely,

Bill

January 13, 2011

Cleaning Question on 1979 Mark

Bill -

What can I use to clean the vinyl top and side moldings on a 1979 Mark 5 ? How do I have to redye the top and side moldings?

Chuck

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Chuck -

Most Car Upholstery shops in your area would be able to refinish your Side Mouldings and Top if needed. As far as cleaning, I have reposted a question from August of last year for your review.... Good luck!

Bill -

August 19, 2010
Mildew On 1979 Mark V Vinyl Roof

Hi Bill -

What can I use to get the mildew off my 1979 Mark 5 Cartier top?

Chuck in North Carolina

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Hi Chuck -

This type of damage to a vinyl top can really take away some of the beauty from these beautiful cars. You have probably tried some household cleaners already with limited success therefore I think that the best advice for you is as follows. Because we don't know the extent of the penetration of the mildew or mould damage into the actual depth of the vinyl I would show it to an experienced automotive upholsterer in your area. He will have seen such problems before and may be able to recommend an ideal product that works best in the environment that your car was in. Failing that, you can check on line and see if any specialty products are available that may suite your needs. Keep in mind though that you may be able to remedy only a partial portion of the damage or you may possibly find out that a new complete vinyl top will be the only answer. If you could possibly send us some photos we may be able to assess the problem better and render further advice. In any case we wish you good luck and please let us know how this turns out for you.

Sincerely,

Bill

January 11, 2011

What Have I Done To My 1969 Continental Now?

Hello Bill,

I have a 1969 Lincoln Continental. I just replaced the points, condenser, cap, rotor, wires and plugs. The point gap is set at .017, and the spark gap is set at .035 as recommended. I did not adjust the distributor/timing.

I also replaced the thermostat due to the old on being stuck open. The old thermostat that I removed was a 160 degree "racing" thermostat. I put in a 195 degree thermostat which the parts store said was recommended original temperature.

Since replacing these item, the engine now pings much worse than before. Also, once the engine is warmed up, it is very difficult to start once turned off, almost like a dead battery. Once the engine cools down, it starts fine and runs fine. Other than the hard starting and pinging, the engine runs great after the tune up. Could the warmer thermostat cause these changes? What else should I check?

Last question I have, would you know where I could obtain the turn signal / tilt arm with the cruise control? Mine is plastic and it is cracked.

I would appreciate any feedback.

Thank you,

Curtis

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Hello Curtis -

Since you indicate that the pinging and hard starting is now worse with the new tune up parts installed you must perform some critical final adjustments. Also be aware that the batteries, starting and charging systems in these 460 CID engines along with their associated wiring must be in very good condition in order to perform correctly. The points adjustment should be checked using a Dwell Meter and adjusted to 26-31 degrees. Next, the initial ignition timing must be adjusted according to specifications with the use of a timing light and the vacuum advance disconnected. If the timing mark is unreadable due to Vibration Damper slippage. the distributor can be rotated Counterclockwise in small increments to reduce the pinging. This can be done of course only while road testing the car. If the Vacuum Advance unit is the adjustable style, it should be tested to make sure that it is operating and adjusted correctly to approximately 3 1/2 turns from max. These adjustable Vacuum advances are shipped in the maximum advance position and will likely contribute to a hard ping condition if not adjusted to your 1969 distributor. This is done with an Allen key through the vacuum line nipple. The original advances are the "take apart style" and are adjusted with the addition or removal of washers and springs, etc. From your description, I believe that most of your concerns can be resolved with the above Dwell and Timing adjustments.

Your 195 degree thermostat is correct as these engines were so equipped when new. We hope that the above will help you to obtain a smooth running and easy starting car. Some of the above may seem difficult or unclear therefore if you feel that you need any further advice or Shop manuals please contact us at any time.

The Cruise Control lever is a very rare part - yours is a good example of most. We can not supply you with any better quality at this time.

Sincerely,

Bill

January 6, 2011

1991 Continental Transmission Issues

Hey Bill,

I just bought a 1991 Lincoln Continental. I was told that it needed a MLPS to get the car to drive. I put one on and I was able to move the car a little bit at a time. It doesn't seem to want to go any where. When the car is in neutral the car acts like it's in gear, but goes no where. When I give it gas it seems to bog down at a high RPM. When the car is in drive I can give it gas and it maintains a high RPM. I don't know if this is enough information for you. I Is there something else I should try? You have given good advise for my 1973 Lincoln Continental.

Thanks,

Lincoln
Ogden, UT

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Hello Lincoln -

The MLPS ( manual lever position sensor) and any linkage on an automatic transmission must of course be installed and adjusted correctly as you probably already know. Because of the description of your problem I would advise that you have a competent transmission technician sit behind the wheel of your car and give you an accurate diagnosis. Your description does sound to me like a transmission problem but one needs to be very careful that further damage is not caused by over revving a slipping transmission. An on site diagnosis by the right person will probably save you time and money in the long run. Let us know what you find out.

Sincerely,

Bill

January 5, 2011

1973 Mark IV Owner's Initials Monogram Placement

Sorry for the language, please where put these are plates on one Mark IV 1973?
Thanks,

Roberto from Italy

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Roberto -

What a great looking car..... The Monogram Plates were sold by the dealers, and could be mounted at the owners choice. However, most were mounted just below the pinstripe - at the center of the doors.

Sincerely,

George @ Lincoln Land, Inc.

January 4, 2011

64 Intake Gasket Installation

Bill,

I have purchased a 64 Continental that is missing a few parts including the intake manifold. I am trying to put an intake on it but am not sure about the way to put the gaskets on. The new gaskets have 2 open coolant passages and 2 restricted passages. The gaskets can go either way to restrict the front or rear passages in the heads. There are no markings on the gaskets to indicate which way they go and my service manual just says to install them with the word front on the gasket to the front of the engine. Do you know the correct direction to install them ?

Thank You,

Steve

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Hi Steve -

Our gasket set indicates that the front portion is the restricted section therefore the blocked off part on your gaskets should be to the FRONT of the engine. Please see attached photo. Hope that this helps.

Sincerely,

Bill

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1958 Convertible Cowl Shake

Hello Bill,

I have a 1958 Lincoln convertible and have serious cowl shake between 35 and 45 MPH. The car runs smoothly at low speeds and high speeds but the shake begins at 30 MPH and ends at 50 MPH. The car is fully restored and everything is adjusted to factory specifications. The car runs perfectly straight and smooth at 100 MPH. My Lincoln is an early 1958 production unit and does not have the engine compartment braces. Would installing these braces eliminate the cowl shake? Is there anything else I could do to eliminate or reduce the cowl shake? It is very annoying and makes for an unpleasant ride because most of my driving happens to be in the 30 to 50 MPH speed range where the cowl shake is at its worst. By the way I am also missing the front underside corrugated steel reinforcing plate located near the rear of the transmission. Could this be causing the cowl shake? Thank you very much for any help that you can provide.

JNT

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JNT -

The kind of cowl shaking and shuttering etc. that you are describing can really make for an unpleasant ride in a fine luxury car such as a 1958 Lincoln Convertible. I fully understand your desire to eliminate as much of this as possible. You mention that "everything is adjusted to factory specifications" so I will assume that the tires and wheels as well as the driveshaft etc. are in balance. I also will trust that there are no loose panels or doors etc.

This series of Lincolns and Marks underwent many, many running changes during their years of production. It is no secret to us Lincoln and FoMoCo lovers that the factory engineers at Wixom were scrambling especially during the months following the 1958 introduction to eliminate the structural problems in order to improve the cars overall performance, handling and ride characteristics. Therefore I agree with you completely that any bracing, dampening or isolating features that were installed on later production vehicles would somewhat improve or eliminate many of the above annoyances that you are experiencing at this time. Chris Dunn has advised me also that some of the early production models - will likely continue to experience some of these issues, even if modified. I would seek out any of these "factory fix " items that can be located and have them retrofitted to my Lincoln. If you like, we at Lincoln Land will assist you in any way that we can to source out any of the required parts. Feel free to contact George or Chris here at Lincoln Land at any time for further help or advice.

Sincerely,

Bill

December 20, 2010

1973 Continental Timing Chain Questions

Hi Bill,

This is Steve again.I checked my thermostat in my '73 Lincoln Continental and I saw that it was stuck in the open position. I just replaced it last year. Now I replaced it again and it works fine. I have another question: My 73 Lincoln has 96,000 miles on it and I wonder if there is a way to find out if the timing chain was ever replaced on it, or if I need to replace it at all. Is there a way to check if it's worn out without taking it apart? I heard something like you have to turn the crankshaft by hand and watch if there is a dead play compared to the distributor rotor. It's a big job, that's why I ask. If I'll have to, is there a timing chain kit brand that you recommend?

Thanks,

Steve

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Hi Steve -

We're really pleased that you have found and repaired the cold engine problem. The timing chain and gear concern is a topic that has many opinions.... Some will advise that one should "not even drive" an older recently purchased car without tearing the front cover off and replacing these parts. It has been my experience however that a vehicle that has been maintained properly and driven in a non aggressive manner will not require immediate replacement simply because of the experience of other car owners. Vehicles that have been idle for years with old acidic oil sitting in their engines as well as those that have been exposed to heavy acceleration may indeed require replacement (or not). If you are embarking on a long journey with your car, and are really worried, or strongly suspect a problem in this area, then a replacement might be a good choice. The brand name of a good kit can also be a matter of opinion but I would definitely not buy on price. I would want to buy a "made in the U.S.A." product from a trusted supplier. We hope that the above helps you with the correct choice.

Sincerely,

Bill

1991 Town Car Belt Issue

Hello Bill -

It's been awhile. I have a 1991 Lincoln Town Car that "eats" a the single belt about once a year. We replaced the alternator awhile back and discovered that we had to change the alternator pulley because of the belt's groove configuration. However, I have had to replace the belt within the last 2 weeks after about a year's use. The engine side of the belt was coming apart. It has been suggested to replace the belt tension pulley system as it may be pushing the belt unevenly. Any thoughts or suggestions on this?

Thanks,

Gregg

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Hi Gregg -

Welcome back to the blog. Replacing a serpentine belt every year is excessive unless you are running up many,many miles. I can offer the following suggestions without actually viewing your engine. The alignment of ALL of the pulleys and idlers to each other must be correct or the belt will continually Scuff in one area and wear out prematurely. The pulleys themselves must also ALL be correct for that 1991 engine. Finally, I recommend only a Premium quality belt be used. A competent well "seasoned" technician should be able to inspect any of the above for you and locate your problem. I hope that these suggestions help you discover an easy to repair defect. Please let us know what you find.

Sincerely,

Bill

December 14, 2010

1971 Mark III Shifting Issues

Hi Bill

I have a problem whit my automatic transmission of my 1971 Mark 3. It looks like my transmission will not shift in gear properly? If I drive the car my gear will not shift up like it is supposed to do?? It will only shift up when I go down on the throttle, as soon as I let the throttle go and the rpm goes down it will shift into the next gear. I have to do this with all gear's. I also sometimes (lets say always !) have to move the gear lever up en down a couple of times to get the best position to go in to his drive gear. I have checked my vacuum hose and it has vacuum on it?? I hope you have some answers for me.

Greetings,

Ray
The Netherlands

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Hello Ray -

Welcome to the Lincoln Land blog. If I am understanding you correctly I think that you should first check the vacuum line which is located at the Modulator valve under the car at the right rear of the transmission. The steel line and rubber hose should not be damaged or deteriorated in any way and adequate engine vacuum should be available there with NO evidence of transmission fluid in the lines. Any internal leaks at the Modulator will require that a new Modulator valve will be needed. Secondly the transmission "kick-down" Rod should be inspected (with the engine OFF) for proper operation at full throttle position of the carburetor and for a return to the idle position (by a separate spring located at the carburetor) when the carburetor linkage is allowed to return back to the engine idle position. If this rod does NOT return as designed, the transmission is locked in a full throttle position. This Rod is located at the left side of the carburetor and connects to the transmission via linkage at the left side of the transmission. The above two items are important controls for the shifting of your transmission and are the first items that we at Lincoln Land would be examining on a vehicle with a shift problem such as you describe. As far as a problem with shifting into DRIVE is concerned, you should check and adjust your manual shift linkage as required as well as inspect for loose bushings etc., in this linkage. I hope that the above leads you to a speedy repair and if you should require any parts or further advice etc. we are at your service.

Sincerely,

Bill

December 10, 2010

The '63 Won't Start....

Hi Bill,

I have owned my Lincoln for 12 years now and in the recent 3 years I haven't driven the car and now she wont start.

Before turning the car over I did the following: Drained and replaced all the fluids, including gas, oil, and power steering. I then replaced all the spark plugs and applied a little WD40 to each piston, then manually cranked over the engine about 30 rotations.

Here's the issues I am having.

1. Tried to turn the car over and a wiff of smoke came out from the fuse box and the ignition switch got hot and also produced a wiff of smoke. The key is now stuck and I cannot remove it. I tried sticking a metal rod into the hole next to the key but nothing has made it budge so far. We checked all of the fuses and none of them have popped.

Question to you: Do have any suggestions on what may have been smoking and should I replace any of the relays near the fuse panel.

2. I towed the car to a mechanic and today and he began by replacing the starter cycloid. When cranking the car over using the cycloid we are NOT getting any spark to the distributor.

One of the mechanics feels that it's the coil.

Question to you: Do you have any suggestions we should look at other than the coil?

And one last question, can you tell me where the ballast resister located?

Thanks so much for your time!

Best regards and happy holidays,

Don

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Greetings Don -

The ignition Resistor is encapsulated within the wiring harness under the dash and inline with the ignition switch wiring. If you are not familiar, a correct wiring diagram is necessary for reference.

As for the rest of your non starting problems you need to approach the situation with a logical sequence of testing in mind. As well as an excellent battery, starter, compression and wiring, you need proper (fresh) Fuel and Ignition in order for an engine to start and run. The above tests should be easy for a competent mechanic to accurately perform WITHOUT GUESSING. If your diagnosing provides you with more information on the problem please contact us further if you need to.

Sincerely,

Bill

December 6, 2010

Update 1973 Lincoln Warm Up Issues

Hi Bill!

It's Steve again with the 73 Lincoln warm up problem. I checked the engine during warm up, I took the radiator cap off while the engine was still cold and I saw that the coolant was circulating in the radiator. It's not supposed to do that, is it? The circulation in the radiator should start when the engine warms up and the thermostat opens up in the upper hose, right? I think my thermostat is open all the time. It's a brand new one, and I replaced it because I was having the same problem; slow warm up. Can it be installed in the other way, backwards?

Thanks,

Steve

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Hi Steve -

If you can see coolant vigorously circulating through the radiator tubes at the filler neck with the cap off after start up and with the engine definitely COLD as you describe, then you are correct in your diagnosis. The thermostat is either faulty or nonexistent. A thermostat installed upside down usually results in overheating because the heat sensing element in the thermostat would then be sensing the cooler coolant at the upper radiator hose instead of the hotter coolant at the intake manifold passages. This would cause it to remain closed longer. I would purchase a new Premium quality thermostat rated at 190 degrees and replace your present seized or defective one. Let us know how it works out for you.

Sincerely,

Bill

November 29, 2010

Warming up the 1973 Continental....

Hi Bill

I have a '73 Continental with a 460. The problem is that it takes around 20 minutes to warm up the engine. When I go and take the highway the coolant temperature starts dropping into the cold zone and stays there until I stop for a couple of minutes and it starts warming up again. I've replaced the thermostat, but I can't think of anything else that could cause this problem. I need some help.

Thanks,

Steve

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Hi Steve -

Welcome to the Lincoln Land Blog. The function of the thermostat is to regulate the temperature of the engine as you already know. I like to see these gauges read somewhat above 1/4 and definitely under 3/4 at full operating engine temperature. It is necessary that the thermostat be of a good quality and should have a rating of 190 degrees. If your thermostat meets the above specifications and the engine does not seem to heat up properly according to your dash indicator, then the gauge circuit itself needs to be properly tested for accuracy as per the Shop Manual. If you require further information on the above or a shop manual please contact us at any time.


Sincerely,

Bill

1989 Town Car AC-Heat Concerns

Hi!

I'd appreciate any ideas re: A/C cooling O.K. Heating on at any position and we get steam in the car. In the VENT position if the control is in the cool area we get cool air coming in. If it's in the warm or hot position we get hot air.

Have a diagram for the vacuum hook up??

Thanks,

Gary

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Hello Gary -

Steam in the vehicle from the AC / Heater unit is almost always an indication of a leaking Heater Core or its immediate tubing. The leaking coolant is evaporated as the air passes through the core and then distributed into the vehicle from the AC vents, the floor ducts or the defrost ducts as a vapor. Only a small tiny leak can produce this effect and you may not even notice a drop in the vehicles coolant level. A new heater core is the answer for this problem. The vacuum diagram and all of the procedures are shown in the necessary Shop Manual. We are posting the AC / Heat vacuum schematic for your convenience. If you need any further assistance such as parts or manuals etc., please contact us at any time.

Sincerely,

Bill

ac.gif

November 11, 2010

1977 Continental with multiple issues....

Hello Bill,

I have a 1977 Lincoln Continental Town Coupe. It has a couple of issues, some I have addressed, some successful and other not so. Installed new, not refurbished carburetor, new master cylinder, battery and A/C compressor and have the A/C system converted to the new R-12 coolant. My lingering issues are brake light came on on the dash, break pedal seems to be not as positive as before, car still does not start as it should by setting the choke as instructed in owners manual. I have to pump and pump the gas to get it to start. A/C still does not blow cold; I have a shutter when I apply power to the car. I checked the drive shaft and the two piece drive shift universal joints seem loose is the fix, to just change all four joints? Another question is do I have to take the steering wheel off to get to the light bulbs behind the gauges behind the dashboard?

Thanks,

Ted

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Hi Ted -

Those 77's are real nice running cars and when all of those problems that you are describing are eliminated from your car yours will be too. The brake light warning light remaining on is USUALLY one of the following. 1) Improper bleeding of the hydraulic brake lines, or failure to bleed at all after repair. 2) Loss of hydraulic pressure in the front or rear lines. 3) Internal failure inside the brake master cylinder. We have never needed to remove the steering wheel to change any bulbs behind the dash although some bulb changes may be difficult.

Your other problems can only be diagnosed with more information from you or actually seeing and hearing the component operate. For instance, for your Air Conditioning problem the R12 refrigerant that you mention IS in fact the original refrigerant. There are several substitutes being used by AC shops and I do not know what was installed in your system or the condition of the other components in your AC system. These AC systems are diagnosed with the use of AC gauges hooked up to the high side and low side lines and the pressures are checked and evaluated along with the outlet temperature at the vents inside the car. The problem could be a control problem or an actual refrigeration problem. Any one or more of a dozen or so faulty conditions are possible here that can cause poor AC performance. Your other symptoms also require knowledgeable on scene diagnosis by competent technicians. If we can receive detailed information from you regarding these problems, we may be able to assist you further.

Sincerely,

Bill

November 9, 2010

1962 Continental Runs Rough After Warm Up

Hi Bill,

I have a 62 continental that runs fine when it is cold, but after it warms up, and I drive it a few miles, it begins to run very rough, almost like some cylinders are not firing.. I've replaced the plugs, wires, cap and rotor, but that did not help. It is even more pronounced when I brake, the whole car shakes violently. This circumstance sometimes fades away after awhile and then comes back, but the car always runs fine initially. Any ideas?

Thank you,

John
San Jose, CA

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Greetings John -

Your statement "It is even more pronounced when I brake, the whole car shakes violently" is a big clue here. When you brake you are actuating the Power Brake Booster and it is applying the brakes with the use of engine vacuum. The booster is supplied vacuum from the intake manifold via a large vacuum hose. If the Booster is leaking internally during such times as a brake application, a large amount of vacuum will be depleted from the manifold. When this occurs the proper air/fuel mixture will be greatly upset to the engine so as to cause your violent shaking. Your power brake unit needs to be inspected as a first step John as soon as possible according to your above statement and my suspicions.

I also would also advise checking the condition of the ignition points and condenser along with the vacuum advance. This checking should include the dwell meter test of the points and the engine timing as well. We hope that the above helps you John. If you have any further information on your problem or require any parts for your repair please contact us at any time.

Sincerely,

Bill

November 1, 2010

1958 Window Issues

Hello Bill,

My name is Mike, and I live in Houston,Texas. I had a question regarding my '58 Continental.

When I got the car, all the power windows worked and would roll up and down from the switches. The rear breezeway window was frozen to the tracks. I took the backseat out and got the window unstuck. I was using a 12 Volt car battery and jumper wires directly to the window motor to roll the window up and down. Immediately after I put everything back together, I tried rolling the other windows down from the switch and nothing works anymore. I am thinking I fried a fuse or breaker of some sort, but have been unable to locate a fuse box in this car. Any idea where it may be or what may have caused this to happen? Any information you could give me would be greatly appreciated.

Thank You -

Mike

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Hello Mike -

The 58-60 Lincolns and Marks are great cars, and excellent cars to have and enjoy today. Because they were very innovative and constantly evolving during their production it is necessary for you to have the maintenance manual to diagnose and repair many items. A manual will pay for itself many times over. The circuit breakers and fuses can be fatigued at this time and certain switches can be internally corroded etc. We are going to send you the wiring diagram for the power window circuits for you to use. We need to know first however if yours is a 4 door or a 2 door as the wiring is slightly different. Please let us know so that we can send this info. to you as soon as possible. If you wish to order a manual instead please contact us and we can arrange for one to be delivered to your address.

Sincerely,

Bill

October 29, 2010

1979 Mark Back Up Light Access

Bill -

Just purchased a '79 Mark V from one of your customers. Car was shipped and received the other day. However, I noticed that the back-up lights are not operating. Please advise how to gain access to change those bulbs. (I purchased bulbs, just need info to gain access.)

Thanks -

Jerry

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Greetings Jerry -

Both Back Up Light bulbs being burnt out can be a possibility and I will ask George to publish a picture and information on their replacement (as I am currently on route to Florida). My first test however would be to check for available power to the bulbs at the rear of the car with the possibility of a faulty Back Up Light switch or a maladjusted switch in mind. This also is a possibility and this sw. is located under the dash on the steering column. Good Luck on the repair but if replacing the bulbs does not correct your problem Jerry a proper test of the Back Up Light circuit may be in your future.

Sincerely,

Bill

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Jerry -

Here's the illustration from the Shop Manual, it doesn't show it that well - but you will find flaps on the back side of the bumper. Lift them up to access the sockets which will twist out......

George @ Lincoln Land, Inc.

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1979 Mark V Stalling Issue

Hi Bill,

I just stumbled across your site while searching for information on a problem I am having.

I purchased this vehicle about 2 years ago mainly as a car to store and drive occasionally. The last three times I have had it out I had a problem, after it runs for 15-30 minutes it just shuts off. I can crank it and nothing happens. My mechanic told me there was a problem with the California emissions on the car so he disconnected it and it was supposed to be fixed. Well I had it out today and about 30 min into my drive it stalled out again, same problem.

After my mechanic came and looked at it he said there was a problem with some small part located right next to the ignition box on the driver's side fender well under the hood. He couldn't find out what the part even was but swore it had to do with the California emissions but that he couldn't find any part number for it or anything. His suggestion is to change out the ignition box for a new Mallory distributor the cost of which is about $330, I was hoping with your experience on these cars you might have a different solution.

Thanks,

Sean

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Hello Sean,

The condition that you describe is not uncommon with the electronic ignition systems of that era and the yes any of these electronic parts could be your problem. Although the system is excellent, the vehicle is over 30 years old and is probably overdue for some service. Under the hood there is indeed a unit known as the Ignition Module. It operates in harmony with other electronic items that are located inside of the distributor cap. Replacing parts without testing may result in success or could be costly if you end up with the same problem if the parts that are replaced are NOT defective. Another difficulty is that many of these quality original parts are now obsolete from Ford. If you would like to receive a complete set of manuals for your Mark V (recommended), contact us at any time. I hope the above helps you to a fast repair.

Sincerely,

Bill

October 19, 2010

2000 Town Car Radio - Compass Issues

Hello Bill,

I have recently purchased a 2000 Lincoln Town Car in good condition.

Recently the radio / compass quit working (radio stopped playing - display goes out for clock and compass). Upon a check of the 5A fuse for the radio, I removed the fuse from the fuse box and checked the fuse - not blown - I re-inserted the fuse and the radio started working.

Later the radio / compass stopped working again - the display for the clock / compass goes away - if I push the fuse box under the dash, the radio / compass will start working - display comes back up again. Also the radio does not lose power because the preset radio stations remain as well as the clock. Any ideas what could be causing this issue?

Thanks for your blog and advice,

Steve

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Hi Steve -

From your statement "If I push the fuse box under the dash the radio/compass will start working" is the key to your problem and the repair in my opinion. If the fuse contacts and the fuse itself are ok the radio fuse wiring in and around the fuse box that "moves" when you push it needs to be very carefully examined. This could be a poorly connected wire or a faulty wire behind the fuse panel that originated at the factory in 2000 and is only now appearing years later. It would not hurt to replace the fuse also in case the fuse is faulty internally. When you have an intermittent connection such as this, it is the same as turning the radio off. The memory in the radio is retained because there is a separate 12v supply at all times to the radio for the station memory and the clock. Again Steve, that point that you push at the fuse box tells me that a bad contact is lurking somewhere at that location. I hope the above helps you find it quickly. I'm intrigued with this problem so please keep us posted on this one.

Sincerely,

Bill

September 23, 2010

Thanks Bill

Bill,

I APPRECIATE whole-heartedly the information you have sent me regarding My Interior Light Issue's..........

Does Lincoln Land have this "Illuminated Entry Delay Module" on hand for sale?

THANK YOU !

I am Humbled by your Reply.

Dale
Las Vegas

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Hi Dale -

Thank you very much Dale for the kind reply. We would definitely have a good used module available for you in the event that this in fact proves to be your problem.

Sincerely,

Bill

September 22, 2010

1971 Mark III Concerns And Questions

Hello Bill,

I recently bought a 1971 Lincoln Mark 3. I bought it in great condition. I'm the furthest thing from a mechanic so I took it to a local classic car shop to have it looked over for issues. They said the car was in excellent condition but recommended I do the following:

A. IDLE AND CARB TUNE AND ADJUST-----------------$225.00
B. REAR WHEEL SEALS LEAKING-------------------------$350.00
C. TRANSMISSION LEAKS 1. OUTPUT SEAL
2. SHIFT SHAFT SEAL----------$275.00
D. OIL PAN GASKET LEAKING-----------------------------$495.00
E. POWER STEERING PUMP LEAKING-------------------$295.00
F. WINDOWS INOP 1.RIGHT FRONT----------------------$185.00
2. RIGHT REAR---------------------------$185.00
3. LEFT REAR-----------------------------$185.00
G. MISC PARTS AND SUPPLIES-----------------------------$100.00

Once the repairs were done, everything began going wrong with the car. It now runs like crap and leaks worse than it did before. Now, a 'SURE-TRAC' light is on and they claim its just a electrical issue, but the brakes feel spongy. Once over 60 mph the car begins to overheat. Do you have any advice on how to fix the overheating and sure-trac light?

Thanks,

Raheem


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Greetings Raheem -

Those Mark IIIs sure are a great looking car and a good choice as a collector car. Both of your problems are standard procedure repair items that are common to all cars. Although you don't elaborate too much on the symptoms I can offer the following.

The illuminated Sure Trac light is generally an indication of an upset in the front to rear brake pressure due to loss of hydraulic brake fluid in the front or rear brakes. It can also be caused by a failed master cylinder that is by-passing internally. Again, the light is reporting a problem to you. After the repair is made the system needs to be bled to center the valve that turns the light on. If the vehicle was purchased with this brake warning light already on, it is possible that a previous repair was made and the system was not bled. The spongy brake pedal feel tells me however that a problem still exists. In any case a good brake mechanic will be aware of the correct procedures.

I do not know the condition of your cooling system or all of the conditions in which your car overheats therefore I will list the common problems as follows:

low on coolant
radiator plugged
thermostat seized in the closed position
cooling shroud missing
incorrect fan blade
faulty fan clutch
incorrect temperature gauge reading
engine coolant passages plugged
rad cap failed

I hope the above will give you some insight into what needs to be inspected to correct your problems. I also understand your situation when you state that "you are the furthest thing from a mechanic". In your case a set of proper 1971 Shop Manuals would be a real plus in the form as a time and labor saver for anyone who is working on your car. Whenever you drop your car off at a shop, the manuals can be made available for the mechanic to use. If you do require any parts or Manuals please contact us at any time and Good Luck.

Sincerely,

Bill

79 Town Coupe Interior Light Update #2

Hi Dale -

After re-thinking your courtesy light problem, I have thought of another item for you to consider. This item is a small module located above the glove box called the "Illuminated Entry Delay Module". It would be well worth the time and effort to locate and unplug this item to find out if your courtesy lights then turn off. This module may have failed internally to a continuous "on" position. We are posting the diagram along with the wiring colors to assist you in locating this item. This module should be located on a panel above the glove box.

Good Luck,

Bill -

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79 Town Coupe Interior Light Update #1

Hi Bill -

Really enjoy the blog!

In regards to the 79 Town Coupe with the interior lights staying on.

I had a 1979 Mark V Cartier that I loved, but one day after I locked the car and started to go in the house, I noticed my interior lights would not turn off! I checked the headlight switch out, thinking I may have accidentally turned the knob, but had not. I even ended up taking it to our local Lincoln Mercury dealer several times. They ran tests, and went through the entire electrical system and the problem persisted. The lights had to be disconnected and the cause of the problem was never found, even after a trip to another garage that specialized in electrical problems!

I was telling a fellow car enthusiast about my frustrating situation and he offered to buy the car, as he did not care that the interior lights no longer functioned. I sold it, but miss it! Fortunately, have not had that problem with my 80s Town Cars. Good luck to Dale in finding the problem and fixing his Town Coupe. If the problem is found, please post it on your blog-still curious. Take care and hello to Sandy, John and Al.

Michael

California

August 30, 2010

1979 Town Car Issues

Hello Bill,

I'm having issues with my 1979 Lincoln Continental Town Car. 1st the door locks do not work .. It's weird, only one works and it's not very good.. fuses are all good. I don't understand what's wrong with those.

Also my fuel gauge doesn't work. I have got power to the gas tank and its a pulsing power .. on off, on off.. so I'm assuming it's the sending unit in the tank. Do you think I could just pull it out and fix it? Or is this not the problem.

Please Help me Bill!

Joe K.

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Hello Joe -

Power door locks are a great convenience.......until they stop. Your PDL problem is very common on all cars as the system ages. If you do have one that works somewhat it tells me that the system is powered up and the failure is probably the door lock motors themselves. Fortunately we have these motor assemblies available new and with a full one year warranty. They come with instructions to adapt them to several years of Lincolns and of course the use of our tech. hotline for further installation advice if necessary. The best ultimate repair is to replace all of these motors and to clean and lubricate the door locks themselves during the replacement. You can and should check for the appropriate power to each of the motors inside your doors before going this route but experience tells me that they have probably failed. We have had little luck in repairing any that have failed. Therefore I think that you should verify the problem in one of the doors first and then be prepared to replace them all. Cleaning and Lubrication of the door locks will also reward you with quick smoother operation with the new motors.

If you have pulsing power at the fuel gauge, connect a 12 v test light to the wire at this pulsed power at the tank with the key in the on position. You should see the gauge on the dash rise. If it does rise and will not move when plugged in with adequate fuel in the tank and the Ground wire at the plug is attached properly to the car body, your tank sending unit has failed or its float has punctured and has sunk ( very common ). This sending unit itself can be tested as per the manual if you are so inclined. We can offer new units or a rebuilding service for your convenience if required. You may however be lucky and need only the inexpensive Float as described above.

I hope that all of the above will get you started on a quick path to the cause of your problems Joe and if you have any further questions or wish to order any parts, please do not hesitate to contact us.

Sincerely,

Bill

T-Bird Crossover Parts

Hey Bill -

It's Lincoln from Ogden, UT again. I have to say what OUTSTANDING Lincolns you have there. I need to replace the headlight vacuum motor on my 1973 Lincoln. I was wondering if you knew if part number D8SZ-13A167A would work, I know someone with one that's new OEM still in the box. I'm sure glad for all your help you offer.

Lincoln
Ogden, UT

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Greetings Lincoln -

Glad that you liked the Lincoln pics. These cars are great drivers and give us a lot of pleasure.

Your posted part number is for a 77-79 T-Bird according to the FORD archives from my contact. The part number needed for your 73 Sedan is DIVY-13A167-A and will fit 70-73. You would need to do a side by side comparison but I don't believe that you could easily adapt it in my opinion. Hope this answers your question and Good Hunting in the future.

Sincerely,

Bill

1971 Mark III Heater Core Installation Question

Hello Bill,

Seems that you are the guru of these old Lincolns.

I have owned my 71 Mark III for about 25 years though it still only has 89,000 miles on it. I'm essentially the second owner as I bought it from the selling dealer's sister. The dealer had kept it for a few years as a family vacation car before selling it to his sister and her husband. Anyhow, it has all the options offered including the sun roof and is rust free and still has a good original vinyl roof. As you can guess it has seldom sat outside much. A while ago the heater core started leaking a bit evidenced by some steam on the windshield. I looked at my 1969 Ford shop manuals and read the description of how to remove and replace the heater core, assuming that my car would be the same as a 69 Mark III but some things look different.

Do you by chance have a 71 Ford shop manual showing the procedure? Is it the same as the 69? I note just glancing at the engine side that the icing switch is off to one side vs. the center position of the 69. Also looking through the glove box with the liner removed things don't look the same as the drawings suggest in the 69. Somehow, it looks like the whole thing can be done from the engine side or am I just getting my hopes up?

Thanks for taking the time to reply. I sure would appreciate it.

Leigh
Calgary, Alberta

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Greetings Leigh -

These heater cores are a fairly common item and are not as hard to replace as they appear. The only real difference between a 69 and the 70-71 is that the emission tube located at the rear of the engine connecting to each of the heads must be removed on the 70-71 to allow for removal of the heater plenum that the "Core" resides in. See the illustration below:

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The 69 does not have this tube. Other obstructions that must be removed or disconnected are the oil pressure switch, the hydraulic wiper motor hoses, and any vacuum hoses, etc. The evaporator front cover should also be removed and that cover also houses the de-icing switch on all three 69-71 Marks. A previous owner may have relocated the de-ice switch on your car (as you indicate) for some reason. When these items are set aside the cover along with the core can be eased out as a unit.

I recommend using a new core as these heater cores are still available new and we sell many of these every year. Do keep your old core on hand though to use as a possible spare for future repair if necessary. I do hope that the above will assist you in your repair and if you do require any further advice or parts please contact us at any time. Calgary is well within easy shipping range for us.

Sincerely,

Bill

August 25, 2010

By Popular Demand.... Here's Bill's ( at least some of them :) )

By request, here are a few of the fine automobiles owned by our "go to" Lincoln Answer Man, Bill Gray.....

George R. Miller
Webmaster @ Lincoln Land, Inc.


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Bill's spotless 1954 Lincoln Capri earlier this summer, also in the photo is Erik Dalemans, our talented restorer here at Lincoln Land....

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The Interior of the 1954 Capri - the Factory AC will freeze you out of the car

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Bill's 1969 Lincoln Continental Mark III, with the rare vinyl roof delete

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Bill's 1970 Lincoln Continental Sedan

We'll post more photos of the other cars in Bill's collection as time allows......

August 24, 2010

A Nice New Car - And A Very Understanding Companion....

Dear Uncle Bill,

Kim and I recently flew from Washington DC to Milwaukee to purchase a
'72 Mark IV, 24,000 original miles, all white with tobacco accents,
spectacular condition.

We drove it home, or almost home to Mt. Lake Park, MD. The car ran
flawlessly until 60 miles or so the other side of Wheeling, WV (130
miles from home). I had run the car until the tank was almost empty
(recall the car had been running perfectly the first 700 or 800 miles)
and stopped and filled up with gas (high test, Amoco). After about 10
miles the car developed a "chugging and surging" feel. I immediately
thought, "clogged fuel filter".... had another one in the glove
compartment, found a shady spot (I had the necessary tools with me....
old cars and all) and changed the fuel filter... while under the hood, I
noticed that the vacuum advance was unhooked, which explained the
higher than normal idle, and a cracked vacuum cap on a manifold port.
Feeling delighted I had made such discoveries and was able to correct
them; we set off, again, for home. The car ran okay for a few miles,
and then it started chugging and surging again. I thought it must be the
fuel filter again and that I had stirred up so much junk in the tank.

So it went... I stopped 3 times for fuel filters, and each time the car
seemed to run fine for a short period and I was totally convinced it
was all fuel delivery issues. By the time we made it to Wheeling, we
had become familiar with several small towns' NAPA auto parts stores.

In Wheeling, I had decided to put an in line filter on the gas feed
line, and THEN hook it up to the regular fuel filter. Now the car would
hardly run and I began the search, on foot, to find someone to flatbed
it to Mt. Lake Park. It was a Thursday afternoon, 102 degrees and I
could only find someone who would do it for about $500. This, of
course, bothered me and I walked back to the car where Kim had been
reading and being the finest sport about the whole thing.... she told
me she had started the car, and it had been idling fine for about 10
minutes.... I said; "let's go!" and on the interstate we went (we enjoy
and had been traveling secondary roads the entire trip with the
exception of Milwaukee to Chicago).

We traveled about 5 miles, and then the car began coughing, backfiring and
soon there-after, quit all together. The highway patrol came (WV
highway patrol are the best!) and recommended a towing company. They
came, towed us to a Lincoln-Mercury dealer that happened to be at the
next exit and we thought; "our troubles are over"..... Nope, they had a
mechanic out with heat stroke, another out sick, and a stack of work
orders and could possibly look at our car middle of next week.

The towing company, a delightful, family owned (back to the 1930's)
came to the rescue. The driver, who was a grandson of the founder,
said he couldn't tow us all the way to Mt. Lake Park with the truck the
car was currently hooked to. So back to their shop, put the car on a
Flatbed and off we went. Kim on the back seat, reading (it was a brand
new International that was very nice), me up front with the driver, and
being glad we were finally going to be home.

We made it to Shaffer Ford in Oakland, MD in about 3 hours and life was
good again ($450. poorer, but good). Shaffer Ford looked and looked
(based on my fuel delivery diagnosis) then went on their own and
discovered the points were burned, the coil shot and the vacuum advance
totally non-functional. And, there was absolutely no problem with the
fuel delivery.

Finally to my question: Could my hooking up the vacuum advance (which
was, and is not functioning properly) have caused the points to burn
and ruin the coil? The car ran perfectly (without the vacuum advance
being hooked up at all) before I "fixed" the vacuum leaks. It is my
opinion that the prior owner (now deceased) was aware the vacuum
advance was bad because it was unhooked. The car runs horribly with it
hooked up, so unhooked it is.

Next problem. A vacuum advance is made for every year on record, but
not 1972. Is my only option to replace the entire distributor (the
rebuilt comes with a new advance)??

Also, where can I find out where all the vacuum hoses go? There are
(3) ports on the thermostat housing, and two others on another valve or
sensor to the left (facing the engine) of the thermostat. Can you tell
me? Is there a diagram available?

This car is so nice and original, I would very much like for it to be
the way it was built, and would like to have all that ugly, but
correct, plumbing back in place.

Also, the receipts that came with the car indicate that the blower was
replaced about 2,000 miles and 20 years ago, as was the heater core.
Now, the heater core is leaking (again) and the blower does not work.
Seems strangely coincidental that they are both not working again.
What are your thoughts? How hard is it to change a heater core on a 72
Mark? What's the best way to check the blower?

Bill, thank you so much for being available to ask all these questions!

All the best and hope to see you soon,

Your favorite nephew,

Carter

Mark resize.jpg

Whaddaya think?

I sure would enjoy seeing some pics of your cars, the 70 Sedan in
particular.

Thanks Bill!
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Hi Carter,

That was quite a ride home for you both. It does sound like it will soon be a real nice car for you. It's a good thing though that Kim was such a sport. I hope that the book she was reading was entitled "How I learned To Understand A Car Buff And The Ways To Convert Him Over To Basket Weaving".

A 1972 Mark with 24000 miles is a real nice find but it also has 38 years of aging as you are already aware of. For all we know these 38 years could be 38 years of short drives and low or no real regular maintenance. The problems that you describe appear to stem from not one but several items that may need your immediate attention. I can tell you that the ignition points did not burn from an inoperative or disconnected vacuum advance in fact they may just be the original factory points. This has happened before to very low mileage vehicles so therefore I believe that a complete tune up is in order at this time and that tune up will include an inspection of the interior of the fuel tank and possibly a carburetor overhaul.

The Blower Motor along with the rest of the Automatic Climate Control system is a fine but complicated system. The blower is located under the dash forward of the glove box and you can check there to see if the blower is receiving power. If there is no power there for the blower with the system switched on you then must trace the electrical circuit. I have repaired many of these systems and to this day I always have the correct manuals at my side. To attempt otherwise is not a good idea.

So Carter the above is based on the present possibilities as they appear to me and the fact that you may not know the cars maintenance history. Get a proper set of manuals and if you need further specific vacuum diagrams etc, we can print these off for you. A set of manuals will pay off in dollars and time saved and if you have a mechanic, he or she will love you for having them available for use. I hope that the above will get you started on a smoother running Mark IV.

Sincerely,

Bill -

August 19, 2010

Mildew On 1979 Mark V Vinyl Roof

Hi Bill -

What can I use to get the mildew off my 1979 Mark 5 Cartier top?

Chuck in North Carolina

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Hi Chuck -

This type of damage to a vinyl top can really take away some of the beauty from these beautiful cars. You have probably tried some household cleaners already with limited success therefore I think that the best advice for you is as follows. Because we don't know the extent of the penetration of the mildew or mould damage into the actual depth of the vinyl I would show it to an experienced automotive upholsterer in your area. He will have seen such problems before and may be able to recommend an ideal product that works best in the environment that your car was in. Failing that, you can check on line and see if any specialty products are available that may suite your needs. Keep in mind though that you may be able to remedy only a partial portion of the damage or you may possibly find out that a new complete vinyl top will be the only answer. If you could possibly send us some photos we may be able to assess the problem better and render further advice. In any case we wish you good luck and please let us know how this turns out for you.

Sincerely,

Bill

August 12, 2010

1963 Rear Main Leaking After Rebuild

Hi Bill -

I started working on the 63 Lincoln a little while ago, and I took the engine into the machine shop and had it machined .030 over and had them assemble the rotating assembly. I got it back put it back in, and the rear main was leaking. I took it back in to the machine shop and he replaced the rope seal with a two part rear main. I put it back in and it's leaking again. What is he doing wrong? What can I do when I put it in the third time to do it right?

Kendall

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Greetings Kendall -

Some projects do turn out to be much more problematic than we expect. Your project on your 63 engine appears to be one of these. You ask the question "what is he doing wrong"?. There really is no way for us to know what the machine shop is doing wrong or not doing wrong without us actually examining the engine on site and knowing more specific history details of the engine.

In all fairness to you Kendall what usually happens in a case such as this is that the machine shop is notified by you that the engine still continues to leak after two attempts to seal the leak at the rear main. The owner or service manager of the shop (I assume the shop is reputable) becomes interested and asks that you bring the car to them so that they can observe the leak first hand and diagnose the problem. At this point they may see that it is indeed the rear main then proceed to disassemble and correct it at their shop or they advise you and show you that the leak is actually originating from another location that they cannot be responsible for. All of the above is good and fair business practice and normally results in success and satisfaction for both parties. I do hope that the above helps to resolve the issues on your 63 Lincoln and if we can help you further in the future please be sure to contact us here at Lincoln Land.

Sincerely,

Bill

July 15, 2010

1972 Signal Light Questions.....

Hi Bill,

Enjoy the blog immensely. Had great service and chat with John in parts recently with regards to power window switch purchase for '72 Continental, picture attached.

Now this is a question that is sure to tax all your mental resources.

Where does the signal light flasher mount on this Continental? Presently it hangs off its wires, behind/below the dash underneath the radio. I have service manual set, owners manual as well as owner light repair and I cannot find this.

Many, many thanks,

Robert

Greetings Robert,


Thanks for your support of the Lincoln Land blog. The Turn Signal Flasher unit, as well as the Hazard Warning Flasher unit, are both shown to be located on the fuse panel on your 72 Lincoln.

The fuse panel is located under the dash at the left side and 8-12 inches above the headlamp foot dimmer switch. The Turn Signal Flasher is shown on my wiring diagram as being the lower unit. If you have the FoMoCo shop manuals you will find a drawing of the fuse panel on page 34-30-04.

I don't know what you are seeing under the dash in the radio area but if you can send us a picture (with a Sony camera), or a better description and the color of the wires etc., we may be able to identify it for you. Hope the above helps you.

Sincerely,

Bill

July 14, 2010

A Tough Question From A Lincoln Lover - An Opinion From Bill

Hey Bill,

I was reading your Blog and I wanted your opinion on something. I am 27, young compared to most Lincoln fans, but I grew up loving them, since I was able to talk I pointed them out to my Dad.

All I have ever owned are Lincolns from a 1975 Continental, to a 1985 Town Car. (And no I have never ruined one by putting rims on it or raising/dropping it).

What bothers me is the way that Lincoln is going today! How do you feel about Lincoln today? All their cars are small and Asian looking. WHY?!?!? For me, Lincoln is the staple of American Automotive design, but the cars are getting more and more Asian looking.

I know that in today's market with fuel prices the way they are the company has to adapt, but there has to be a happy medium. The MKZ looks like a Toyota to me.

I have to compliment Chrysler for the design of the 300. Other big cars have been succeeding as well; the new Charger, Camaro, and Challenger have done well. I keep imagining a new Town Car in the vein of the Chrysler 300, and it would be amazing!

I love Lincolns, but I have to say that any thing past the 1985 Town car doesn't really interest me. (Well, there are some pretty sweet 2000- 2005 models).

How would you like to see the company evolve?

Thanks for your great site and service.

Bryan

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Hi Bryan,

We are glad that you enjoy the Lincoln Land blog. Your views and questions take in a lot of territory, and are shared by many of us in the old and classic car hobby including myself.

I also grew up as you did being able to recognize car brands from a distance and wowing my Dad by calling out names and models. It is difficult to describe why certain things become important to us in life, but many of us learned at an early age that a real nicely maintained and good looking machine was something to admire - and to be proud of if you owned one.

Many of the older cars that we now love to collect and drive have a look about them that lets you believe that they could actually fly you to the moon. All of that type of styling and design is now lost, as the newer vehicles have evolved into utilitarian and really not very attractive people movers. I have tried to like the newer Lincolns, Cadillacs and others but I just can't see any real value in them. The above is only my opinion of course and I am sure that many will have an opposite opinion.

One thought that I am sure of though is that many of our older Lincolns are things of beauty and to us in the old car hobby, "a thing of beauty is a joy forever".

Sincerely,

Bill

June 29, 2010

1978 Town Car Issues

Hi Bill,

The other day I barely made it into the driveway after a 25 mile trip with
my 1978 Continental Town Car 400 engine with 40k miles.

A new gas filter proved not to help. Since it had the original plugs, I replaced them and put on the second set of wires, and replaced the cap and rotor. No change. I have checked all vacuum lines and they prove OK. Today, I blew back the gas line
even though the gas was leaking out at the fuel pump when disconnected. I put
pressure on the line from the gas filter to the fuel pump and it was clear.

The fuel pump was replaced about 5k miles ago. The car was not easy to start so I turned up the idle. It runs smooth pretty much at high idle after about 5 minutes, but when putting it in gear, it goes down to a shake if warmed but will stall on choke.

Also I checked the gas cap by removing it and still no change. I have used carb cleaner on all vacuum lines going in and into the carburetor and the carb shows they are clear by increasing the idle. I have also used carb spray directly into the carb with no change. Am I missing something stupid or do I need the carb rebuild?

Thanks.

Ed

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Greetings Ed -

Sounds like you were lucky to make it back home. A car that had the original plugs and wires still in use after 32 years could also have the untouched original and never serviced carburetor on the engine. It could very well be and likely is that the carburetor is in need of a good cleaning after this amount of time and 40,000 miles even though it may not actually be your problem as described.

Since you have checked part of the fuel delivery system I think that you do need to continue and do a fuel pressure and volume test at the carburetor inlet. This will show that the pump is able to draw fuel from the tank through the screen in the tank through the fuel lines and then pump it to the carburetor. If this test proves ok and the fuel delivery is in good order I would move to the carburetor at this point. You can check to see if the choke is operating properly first. The choke must be closed upon starting a cold engine and then it must open slightly when started and then continue to open fully as the engine warms up. The carburetor inside could be gummed up or the floats and needle valves could be faulty and allowing the engine to flood with fuel (too rich a mixture). Of course other problems can develop inside a dirty carburetor as well. If you agree that the carburetor has never been cleaned, I think that it is overdue for this service.

Another problem that could cause this stalling on your 78 Lincoln is a failing ignition system. Your car has an excellent fully electronic ignition system. Electronic parts can and do fail and the problem may first appear as a stumbling or stalling condition. Some failures may cause the engine to shut off and not start until repaired. Your particular problem could of course possibly be the first scenario.

I would first approach the situation with a complete fuel system check as described above including a carburetor service. After that and if the problem persists I would then check the ignition system. A seasoned tune up mechanic may be able to pick out a problem quickly as he will actually see and hear the engine running. We hope that the above leads to a speedy repair for you and if there are any parts or advice that we can provide, please do not hesitate to contact us at Lincoln Land.

Sincerely,

Bill

June 18, 2010

Questions Regarding Proper Oil For His Lincoln

Bill,

I sure enjoy the advice you offer. Your blog has been my go to often. My question this time is about oil weights. I have been told by different people to use a certain weight. My car has about 103,000 miles on it. What weight do you suggest I use. Also a brand of oil, etc.

Thanks so much,

Lincoln
Ogden, Utah

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Hi Lincoln -

Nice looking Continental you have there and we are happy that you enjoy the blog. When you ask about oil choices you will get hundreds of different answers so I can only give you my own opinion. Other opinions will also be valid and may also apply.

When asked about oil and oil changes I have a saying "oil is cheap, metal is expensive". I believe in having uncontaminated and clean looking oil in my engines at all times Assuming that the 460 engine in your car is in good shape at 103,000 miles and is not using any oil, or excessive oil. I would use 10-30 weight. If you drive it in winter time around town the engine would appreciate 5-30 during these cold periods. When you embark on a long road trip during a hot summer, 10-40 would be a good choice at that time. I prefer full synthetic oil in all my Lincoln engines from the 54 Capri to the 93 Cartier. They have all been changed to the synthetic product at this time. I always use a premium brand, and I like Ford's Motorcraft brand of oils and filters. I believe that other national brands of oils and filters are also of an excellent quality, but I still believe in the quality of the Ford name.

There is still the question of certain additives being absent in today's modern oils that were necessary to satisfy the needs of the engines in our older cars. For me and in my own personal opinion the jury is still out on this verdict. I have seen no evidence of any lubrication problems caused by oil in any of my engines. The manner in which most collectible older cars are driven of course may be different than a daily heavy use vehicle. This is why I do respect and appreciate others opinions but of course in the end you must make your own choices. I hope that the above helps you to make the correct decisions for your Lincoln.

Sincerely,

Bill

June 7, 2010

1973 Continental Sedan Concerns

Hi Bill!

I have a '73 Continental 4 door Sedan. The two power windows on the rear don't work. If I turn the switch I can hear the motors working but the windows are not moving. I'm able to push the window glasses down in the door and pull them up by hand. Are my window motor gears worn out or it can be something else? I looked up the plastic gears on eBay, but I wasn't sure which one was for me, 9 or 7 teeth.

I'm also having a problem with the driver side mini-vent window. It doesn't go all the way up, stops about an inch and a half before it suppose to. I adjusted on the 'up stop' and on the 'vent equalizer', but I don't see any more possibility for adjustment in the service manual. Is there more?

I'm also having problem with my fuel gauge. Most of the time it does not work, but if it does it's not accurate. When I gas up it shows that the tank is full, but the needle gets down to the 'E' when the tank is still half full of gas. I appreciate if you could help me, thank you.

Steve

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Hello Steve,

Welcome to our Blog. If you can raise and lower your windows by hand it sure does sound like the gears have collapsed inside the motor assemblies. We have these parts on hand right here at Lincoln Land as this is a common failure. At the same time as the gears are replaced the moving window parts inside the doors should be cleaned and re-greased. Another problem that I should mention at this time is that many Lincolns of this era suffer from slow operating windows. We have found that this is due to the design of the power window electrical system that allows reduced power to reach the motors. We have in many cases installed relays for the motors on some customer's vehicles so that the windows operate on increased electrical power. The result is a vast improvement in the power window operation. However, this is not a project for the timid, and may be something for you to consider in the future. Your vent window problem sounds like lack of lubrication or possibly a weak motor. It should be re-inspected with this in mind.

The fuel gauge concern in my opinion could be caused by the float that is located on the sending unit in the fuel tank. It is not uncommon for these to leak and sink. The result is a false gauge reading. If that is the case we have them in stock and they are inexpensive. Another common possibility is that the sending unit itself is faulty and requires replacement or overhaul.

When you get further into these above concerns, please contact us for further advice, etc.

Sincerely,

Bill

June 4, 2010

1991 Town Car Mystery Noise

Hello Bill -

I have a question about my 91 Town Car. When I make a right turn into a driveway apron I hear a "clink" sound on the right rear side just as the right rear wheel reaches the top of the apron. It seems that I have to be going up hill for the sound to occur. I can make a right turn on a generally level area I have no sound.

My mechanic has already had the car up on the hoist but found nothing that would indicate a problem. Is it possible that it might be something in the differential or rear axle housing? The car is reaching 153,000 miles. Thanks for your time and for being there.

Gregg

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Greetings Gregg -

Some of these types of sounds are annoying and can be a cause for concern because they may be possibly announcing an expensive repair in your future. These noises are also hard to describe in a letter to someone else such as myself because one person's clink could be another person's creak etc.

Your 91 has enough time and miles on it now to have several suspension and steering related noises that may require attention at this time. Thinking your problem over I rule out the rear axles and differential (at this time) because that assembly does not know if your right turn includes an incline as you describe but all of the vehicles rubber bushings, suspension and links etc., however do feel this effect.

Before pursuing the rear axle and differential idea I would want the car inspected on a front end machine with the wheels on the ramps holding the car up as it would be while driving. A good front end and suspension technician should road test the car with you beforehand to see if he agrees with me that your noise could be a failed rubber suspension bushing of some sort. He then will inspect all of these bushings front and rear as well as items such as sway bar links, ball joints, spring mounts, body mounts and shock absorber mounts etc. On the other hand a road test by a concerned technician may lead him to another area of concern that only an on site road test and inspection can reveal such as rear brake problems or loose exhaust pipes etc.

As you can see, the above procedure is leading you to a less expensive first approach rather the delving immediately into an expensive rear axle assembly procedure. I hope that the above ideas help you and I hope that it turns out to be something simple such as a loose tailpipe.

Sincerely,

Bill

June 2, 2010

How Much Is My Car Worth?

Good Morning Bill,

I have a question regarding the sale and realistic price guidelines for a '65 Continental Convertible that would require a restoration. It appears difficult to find price comps that are reliable, I suppose, because every car is different.

This car has an excellent running motor, drive-train, breaking and exhaust system - all in current running order. However the body, interior and electrics need substantial work.

Is it possible for you to give me an idea of a price point to ask for the car? I don't want to overprice it or give it away.

Thanks for any help you can offer.

Mark

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Greetings Mark -

I can imagine that this can be a real dilemma for you. Restoring a 60's Lincoln 4 door Convertible can fall into a category somewhere between extremely expensive, to over the top and out of reach for most pocket books.

While the complete drive-train and its support systems are very important, the complicated convertible top, and its window mechanisms, along with the unibody construction can be as much as 70-80% of the cost of restoration.

We would find it difficult and unfair to you to estimate a price point without inspecting your Lincoln on site. For this reason we would suggest purchasing the latest Car and Parts Price Guide, as well as Hemmings Motor News. Using the first type of guide can help you choose which condition your car falls into, and project a fair selling price. The latter will allow you to again see what the market is currently at in various areas of the country. In addition I would urge you to check venues such as eBay on-line. I hope that we have been of some help to you in this matter and I am sure that you can understand our position.

Sincerely,

Bill

May 26, 2010

1989 Town Car AC Issues

Bill,

I have a 1989 Lincoln Town Car Signature Series with 215,000 miles. The problem is that you get heat through the dash vents when you accelerate the engine even with everything turned off and temperature set on 60. If you are sitting still idling or going down hill with the air conditioning on everything runs fine until you begin to accelerate the engine. I have had my car to the local Ford Lincoln Mercury dealer twice and they were unable to locate the problem. I have replaced the main vacuum harness coming from the exterior firewall through the passenger cabin that goes to all the vacuum pumps and main auto climate controls which is all one piece. I have also replaced the ambient air temperature sensor and main vacuum control on the auto climate system (where you select which mode you want such as temperature and floor vent, etc.) I also have tried another blend servo pump (behind the glove box) and the problem still exists. You can hear a door or something move when you accelerate the engine and hear it move again when you let off the gas. I think I also tried the vacuum check valve on the exterior firewall also. Are there any electrical/vacuum controls under the hood that would malfunction and cause this? Please Help!!!!!!

Thanks Bill....

Justin in Virginia

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Hello Justin -

Loss of cool AC on acceleration and defaulting to heat is a common problem in Town Cars of that era. It is always caused by one or more vacuum leaks. Vacuum leaks in the AC system can develop any where that the vacuum is routed. According to your report you have replaced many of the more likely problem parts but I don't know if you replaced them with new parts, good known parts or only unproven used parts. Another point is that replacing parts without proving that they are actually defective is never the best way to go. This method is usually very expensive, more time consuming and frustrating.

Assuming though that all of the items that you have already replaced are indeed in good working order there are other areas where leaks can be found in that system. They are the Vacuum Reserve Tank, Cold Engine Lock Out Switch (or CELO) and its vacuum lines (located in one of the heater hoses) any vacuum line and any of the under dash vacuum mode motors, etc. As mentioned above, any suspected items should be properly tested for leaks before condemning. If no leaks are found anywhere then you or your mechanic must backtrack and revisit problem areas. Some leaks can be elusive and therefore time consuming to locate but it can be done. Whenever I work on these exact problems I always have the vacuum diagram within reach, therefore I would advise that you or your mechanic also have one available.

If we can help with any further information, manuals, diagrams or parts please let us know. Please advise us Justin when you locate the problem so that we can post your success on the blog. Good Hunting!

Sincerely,

Bill

May 13, 2010

Memories of the old '61 Continental....

Mr. Bill -

I've got a question for you. When I was a kid in the 1960s we had a 1961 Continental Sedan in Saxon Green and I was wondering if that was the only year that they offered that color? The interior was matching green leather with the walnut trim on the doors and steering wheel. I have not seen one since then....

Great website....I was at your place back in 1992. I think you have grown a little since then. My interest in the Lincolns predates yours as the first one I remember we had was a 1953 Capri and what a complete change they made within 10 years!

Keep it up.


Doug
Laguna Woods, California

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Greetings Doug -

You're correct in stating Saxon Green was a rare color.... and only offered by Lincoln in the 1961 model year.

We just sold a convertible last year with the exact combination that you have described,
And we've posted a photo, as well as the original Lincoln factory samples.

61 redone 2.gif

61-E.jpg

61-LGM.jpg

We appreciate your compliments on the website - of course we're here to make money, but all of us here at Lincoln Land have a great love for the brand. We like to think that we are helping to continue it's great legacy in our own little way...

Be sure and check out "1956-2008 Lincoln Production And Sales Information" - you can find a lot of information there, and we update the site constantly - so there's always something new.

If your travels bring you to Florida - please stop by and see us, we always enjoy putting a face with a name (and showing off our facilities).

All the best -


Bill Gray - Blog Host
Chris Dunn - Owner
George R. Miller - Webmaster

May 7, 2010

78 Town Coupe Vinyl Roof Questions

Hi Bill,

I have just got myself a 78 Town Coupe with only 30 Kilometers on the clock (has been in England since 1979), and the seller said it is unusual as it was ordered from new with no vinyl on the roof, is that correct?

Thanks in advance -

Dave in the UK

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Welcome Dave -

Welcome to the world of the Lincoln hobby and Lincoln Land. The vinyl top treatments were typically standard equipment on Lincolns and other cars of that era. They were considered the "in" thing to have such as wheel covers and whitewall tires etc. However the Dealer's factory order forms normally included an option called Vinyl Top Delete. When this box was checked off at the time of the ordering process the top was finished without the vinyl roof treatment and the customer usually received a credit on the price of the vehicle.

The discussion regarding this delete option was in most cases brought up at time of sale by the customer as probably 99.9 % were ordered with the standard vinyl roof. So the answer to your question is yes, your Lincoln may indeed have been built without the vinyl top. However, be advised that some vinyl tops were removed by some owners at a later date because of severe corrosion to the metal under the vinyl, or decomposition of the vinyl top itself. A good body man in your area will able to advise you if yours was removed, or is all original as the seller says.

In any case I am sure that you will enjoy your Lincoln and any time that you may require any parts or manuals etc., be sure to visit our vast website or give us a call. We will be happy to arrange quick delivery to you at any time.

Sincerely,

Bill

May 6, 2010

1978 Mark Coolant Leak Mystery

Hello Bill,

I hope all is well for you in Lincoln Land.

This might seem like a strange problem to you but here goes. I have some type of a coolant leak. You can leave the car running over a dry surface and no leaks appear. I don't see where there is any fluid coming off the radiator or hoses. It's a fairly fast leak and I have to add coolant about every three days if I'm driving it once a day.

There are no head gasket issues and no smoke from the exhaust, except on start up temporarily and it doesn't smell like coolant and my oil is dark so I know the head gasket is fine, plus if it was leaking that much It would be smoking non stop.

So my big question is where do you think the leak might be coming from and why is there no leak when the engine is running and I'm in park on my driveway???

Sincerely,

Confused Lincoln Lover Justin

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Greetings Justin -

If you are sure that the internal engine seals and gaskets are ok, the only other way to loose coolant is from an external leak that can be found, or the system is being overfilled when the engine is cold and the excess is disappearing out the overflow system as designed. If you are sure that you are in fact not overfilling, then the best method to find an external leak is to have the cooling system pressurized by using the appropriate Cooling System Pressure Pump that most automotive service shops have. This device can be used on a cold engine and a hot engine (some leaks only appear at certain engine temps). The gauge on this device can be observed for a pressure drop at the same time as the leak will appear to the observant technician. The leak should appear in the usual locations such as radiator, radiator cap, coolant hoses, heater core, water valve, water pump, freeze plugs, etc., etc. If the pressure on the gauge does in fact drop thus indicating a leak and no leak can be seen, then you may indeed have an internal engine leak but I wouldn't lean towards that conclusion until I have fully exhausted all of the other possibilities. Be positive that you are not overfilling the cooling system (there are cold fill markings on the radiator or overflow tank), and that your radiator cap is not defective. The Pressure Pump can also be configured to test the radiator cap.

Some leaks require some time and concentrated automotive detective work, and the location of the leak may surprise you. Please let us know what problem you find so that we may post the information here for others to see.

Good Luck -

Bill

April 28, 2010

1991 Town Car Update #3 and Mark III Blower Motor Questions

Hi Bill -

Well, we did it. We replaced 4 lifters and valve seals on the third and fourth cylinder on the driver's side. We tuned it to boot, so it seems to be fine - no ticking. Thanks for your help on this.

I want to ask you a question too about getting a heater/ac blower motor for the 70 Mark III. I have put in a question to Lincoln Land parts but have not heard back yet. Is it possible to rebuild these motors and if so does Lincoln Land do that? I've got all the parts except the blower. I have the original and while I could hear it turn before I took the unit apart, I'm not sure what kind of shape it is in other that being very rusty. I've cleaned it up quite a bit, but I would like to replace or rebuild it before I put everything back together.

Thanks for being there.

Gregg

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Hi Gregg -

We're glad that you got the 91 looked after and I bet that you are glad that you went ahead with that repair.

As for the Mark III blower motor, we don't rebuild them here at Lincoln Land at this time because we are still able (in most cases) to supply new units. However, if you have been able to actually take your unit apart successfully as you indicate, why not check with a local small Electric Motor and Alternator/Generator Repair shop in your area. They may be able to supply you with new motor brushes and perhaps bushings also if you need them. Don't forget to oil the bushings. Failing that, I am sure that we can arrange a new motor for you if necessary.

I'm not sure who took your original inquiry at Lincoln Land but you should be getting a similar answer back from that inquiry as well.

Sincerely,

Bill

April 27, 2010

2000 LS Cranking Issues

Hi Bill -

My 2000 Lincoln LS just cut off on me one day. I cranked it up and turned out of the parking lot and my car just shut down. It now sound like my car is trying to crank up, but wont crank up all the way. I took it to three different shops and got three different answers. One man said I needed a new wiring harness. Another one said that my harness was good, but my computer system is messed up. The last one said my computer system is just fine but my timing chain was gone with two bad valves. Can you please tell my anything about what you think may be wrong with my car.


Thanks,

Shawnte

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Hello Shawnte,

Ah Yes, Car ownership can be frustrating. The problem that you describe also shows up in the many Lincoln Town Cars that we service here at Lincoln Land and in many cases it turns out to be a failing Crankshaft Position Sensor or CPS. Unfortunately though we do not see many Lincoln LS vehicles here in our shop and therefore I am not going to do you wrong by making a specific guess. I believe that in your case you should visit the largest Lincoln dealer in your immediate area and speak to the Service Manager or the Shop Foreman only. State your problem (show him this e-mail) and ask him if he has a Technician with LS experience. A good technician with the proper experience will be able to locate your problem and repair it in short order and will save you much time and money in the long run. Leave your LS for repair only at a Ford or Lincoln dealer or a trusted shop that actually has LS experience. I hope the above advice will lead you to a quick repair. Please let us know how it all turns out.

Sincerely,

Bill

April 21, 2010

1991 Town Car Engine Noise Update 2 ....

Hi Bill -

Thought I would drop a quick line on the 91 Lincoln. Monday morning the 19th "Ms Lincoln" goes in to repair this noise, I will keep you posted. From time to time I come to realize that I am in actuality restoring two cars at the same time: the 70 Mark III and the 91 Town Car --- it's no wonder that I am so tired and so broke some times!!! I've got to tell you though it is fun, and they are on the way to becoming two beautiful Lincolns.

Thanks for being there.

Gregg

1979 Lincoln Continental Power Issues

Hi Bill,

I bought 1979 Lincoln Continental 4 Door Sedan about two weeks ago. The car drove fine until yesterday, when it totally died on me. It seems like there is no electricity in the car at all, I mean the dash board doesn't light up, no interior lights - even lighter is out.

The battery is fine; the solenoid off the battery lets the electricity through (checked with voltmeter). By my mechanics suggestion, I changed the ignition switch, with no results. I also am not able to locate a wiring diagram for this car.

Seeing how you are helping people out with all these issues I was wandering if you could give me a suggestion on what to try next.

Thank You

Taras

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Hi Taras,

Welcome to the Lincoln hobby, and yes we will be pleased to help you.

If you are sure that your battery is fine as you say, you must start at the battery and follow the electrical path to wherever it travels from the battery. Do not try to guess and replace parts without testing first and proving them faulty, this only adds to your frustration and expense.

I don't have the wiring diagram in front of me at this time for your car but the power path should lead you to the Solenoid from the Battery, and then to a pair of Fusible Links, and then to the Circuit Breakers, Fuses and the Ignition Switch, etc.

Whenever you and your mechanic are ready, call us at Lincoln Land and we can arrange to send to your address any Wiring Diagrams or Manuals that you wish. Problems such as this should not take too long to diagnose, but the proper wiring diagram in this case is definitely is a must for you.

Good luck on the repair -

Bill

Issues Locating Fuses In Europe

Hi Bill -

Can you tell me something about the fuses a 1971 Mark 3 use? I have some bad fuses and I want to change them out, but now it seems that they do not sell the fuses here in The Netherlands. I am talking about the shorter ones used for example for the Turn Signals, Low Fuel Warning, etc. There is also one fuse a little bit bigger and that's the (20 AMP) for Rear Reading Lights, Map Lamp, etc. I hope you can tell me the Fuse names or ordering codes, so I can look for them online. I hope to here from you soon.

Best regards,

Ray

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Greetings Ray -

That must be frustrating for you. I would think that something as small as a fuse should be easy to obtain. We don't have any problem here at Lincoln Land with fuses, and I can't think of any special names or ordering codes for them but I do have an idea.

Why not call, or e-mail George R. Miller here at Lincoln Land (email: georgermillerll@att.net) - and I am sure that he will be pleased to put together a special complete package of 1971 Mark III fuses and send them to you. Ask him to include 8 or 12 each of the popular ones so that you have enough spares. Fuses are light in weight, so the cost of mailing or shipping should be reasonable. Also at this time if you have any other needs for your Mark III, George can look after them for you as well.

Sincerely,

Bill

1965 Exhaust Smell

Hi Bill,

I recently bought a '65 Continental Convertible in fair condition. I am new to owning older cars like this and I am afraid my wife won't go near this thing because of the smell from the exhaust.

Mechanics report that the current exhaust system is working fine, but I can tell it is getting towards replacement soon anyway.

What is the best route to go to reducing fumes and emissions from these cars?

Thanks,

Brent

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Hi Brent -

Congratulations on your purchase and welcome to the Lincoln side of the old car hobby. Because neither of us knows the condition of your engine I can offer several hopefully logical suggestions.

Your question is regarding fumes and emissions so therefore a competent technician should be allowed to completely evaluate your engines condition. This should include a complete tune up in all respects along with a report of the engine's general condition regarding compression and oil pressure etc., as well as whether the valve stem seals may possibly need replacing (blue exhaust smoke).

The positive crankcase ventilation system (PCV) should also be inspected and serviced as necessary as per the 1965 Lincoln Shop Manual, and of course all oil and coolant leaks should be attended to as well as they are a common source of smoke, and or fumes, etc.

I also cannot stress strongly enough that the Shop Manual is a must for you and can pay for itself many times over in the long run. All of the above should be a good place for you to start and may lead to some pleasant cruising for you and your wife. If you do decide on the Manual or need any necessary parts for your Lincoln we are always at the ready to quickly look after your requirements.

Sincerely,


Bill

April 13, 2010

1991 Town Car Engine Noise Update....

Hi Bill -

Thanks for the encouragement on the 70 Mark III. Hope to have most of the immediate mechanical work done and have "Ms C" in the body shop by the end of May, lots to do.

About the Town Car, I took your advice, and my mechanic and I have come to the conclusion that what we are listening to is a hydraulic valve lash adjuster on the exhaust valve of the last cylinder on the driver's side bank. We have put Rislone in on the last three oil changes and the tap seems to come and go, and when the engine is warm that's when it seems to quiet down, but is still noticeable if you know what to listen for.

I'm wondering what the next step is.

My mechanic and I talked about replacing all of the adjusters, however I've been wondering about going ahead in say six months and rebuilding the engine completely. It has 152,000 miles and doesn't use oil between changes, but I'm inclined to head in the direction of a complete rebuild. Would you care to offer a take on the situation?

Thanks for being there.

Gregg

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Gregg -

Congratulations on 152,000 miles with no oil consumption between changes. My thoughts are that 6 months is a long time to wait with an engine noise that may possibly develop into other damage if left unattended.

If your technician is confident, and is familiar with these engines, could he be persuaded to replace the offending hydraulic valve lash adjuster at this point in time? At the same time, he could replace the valve stem seals if this has not already been done on your engine.

Performing a much smaller repair now may save much added expense at a later date. Good luck on a proper decision that only you and your technician can make.

Sincerely,

Bill

April 12, 2010

73 Continental Starter Installation Problems

Bill,

I got the carburetor replaced on my 1973 Lincoln Continental I asked you about a few months ago. Now my starter is gone out, and I had a heck of a time getting it out. Now I'm having trouble getting the new one in. I just can't seem to get it in the right position.

Any ideas on an easy way to get the starter in, if it didn't have the solenoid it would be easy to put back in. Any Help would be greatly appreciated. Thanks for your help and advice.


Lincoln

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Greetings Lincoln,

Not knowing what your starter is binding on and assuming that you have the correct starter we can offer two scenarios. If it is binding on the steering linkage you can loosen the idler arm at the frame to allow more room for installation or if the motor mounts and or transmission mounts are crushed or deteriorating you can loosen them and jack the engine up for more clearance. These are the only suggestions that come to mind that I can relate to at the moment. Hope this helps. Be sure to let us know if we can be of further help.

Sincerely,

Bill

April 1, 2010

1971 Mark Distributor Vacuum Questions

Hi Bill -

Thanks for answering my last questions about the turn signal lever and the rim blow horn! I am busy with these problems as we speak. Now I have a new one for you, and that's about my distributor.

I have installed a new intake manifold and carburetor (Edelbrock) in my 1971 Mark III. But now I do not know if the distributor vacuum port is timed (no vacuum at idle) or full vacuum (vacuum present at idle). I hope you can help me with this one, so I can connect the vacuum hose to the designated port at the carburetor.

Ray

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Hi Ray -

That era of Ford built engines is set up to provide no vacuum to the distributor at idle. They did however provide an override that would automatically apply full manifold vacuum to the dist. in the event of an overheated engine coolant condition. This feature consisted of a sensor mounted into the thermostat housing with an additional vacuum line to the intake manifold. When the engine is overheated the engine timing will advance to increase the engine idle and subsequently the cooling fan and water pump speeds during the overheating in order to assist with the engine cooling. Many of these are now by-passed or wrongly installed and the system is generally not considered crucial as a cooling feature but is nice to have in order to maintain authentic engine controls. The theory of operation and its plumbing can be seen in the Shop manual. Hope this helps.

Sincerely,

Bill

March 22, 2010

1970 Mark III Instrument Panel Lights

We thought we'd share a resent inquiry from one of our regular customers, as this can be a common problem.... Bill.

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Chris -

I noticed on the 70 white Mark III that the instrument panel lights were not coming on when I turned on the parking lights or the headlights. I replaced the 6 amp fuse and they still did not work. I checked the fuse and found it had gone bad. I put in another new fuse and tried the lights again and still no instrument panel lights. I pulled that fuse out and found that it had gone bad.

Would you or any of your guys have any idea what in the instrument panel light circuit might be blowing out the fuse? Both other cars work fine. Is there any particular area I could have the guys at the shop look at to determine what the problem might be? I've got a copy of the Mark III's electrical system schematic so I can use that with the shop if you have any ideas on what to check.

Otherwise, I hope things are going well at Lincoln Land. Won't be long and we'll be heading to Ocala. I did order an entry level Pace American enclosed car hauler trailer so I hope to have it for the trip down. That should save a lot of cleaning effort!

Take care,

Jerry

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Jerry -

That 6 Amp fuse is for the dash instrument panel lights and any others that may be on the instrument panel dimmers (light blue with red tracer) wire such as radio dial and climate control illumination, etc.

The first suspect in my opinion could be a shorted wire that goes up the steering column to the transmission quadrant shift indicator. Have this wire unplugged at the lower column and then try another fuse. Things at Lincoln Land are looking great and the weather is turning for the better.

Bill

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Bill,

Thanks for the tip. I'll give it a try this week and let you know.
Take care,

Jerry

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Chris,

If you are in the proximity to "Bill's Corner," please pass on my thanks to him for his excellent advice regarding the instrument panel lights not working in the white Mark III. I was out at the hangar last night and was able to disconnect the wire going up the steering column as he suggested. After putting in a new 6 amp fuse, I turned on the parking lights and much to my delight the instrument panel lights and other lights on that circuit came on just like they are supposed to. Obviously, the light for the shift indicator did not come on but that's no big deal.

I appreciate all the assistance -- and I'll holler at you if I get in over my head again!!!

Jerry

March 18, 2010

1971 Mark Turn Signal And Horn Issues

Hi Bill -

I have a question about a turn signal lever. My turn signal lever of my 1971 Mark III (tilt steering) is broken (common problem!). My car has a turn signal lever with cruise control. Now I can buy a turn signal lever with out cruise control, will this fit my car?? To be honest, I do not care if my cruise control will work anymore because I never use it anyway! But will it fit?

I also need some help with my horn (rim blow) this is not working! Can you give me some direction where I have to start looking? I hope to hear from you.

Thanks!

Ray

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Hi Ray -

You should have no problem using a conventional turn signal lever as a replacement. Of course you then would need to make other arrangements to operate the Speed Control if you ever wanted it to operate again.

To find out if the Rim Blow insert is faulty, remove the horn pad and momentarily short the wires together. If the horn then works, the problem is probably in this insert switch. There is one available on E-bay at this time #300407403513. They are rare.

We wish you Good Luck
Bill

March 15, 2010

1961 Fuel Delivery Issues

Bill -

I just ordered a shop manual from you yesterday as I purchased a nice '61 Sedan in Cooper City FL and drove it to Kentucky last weekend.

After 100+ miles on the highway at about 70MPH it develops the old "flat on it's face, out of fuel" symptoms. If I feather the throttle to the next filling station and fill it up it suspiciously takes 11.3-11.5 gallons and runs fine 'til next time.

I'm thinking there may be a crack in the pickup tube in the tank about 1/2 way down and when the gas drops to that level it sucks air. Ever heard of it and does it sound reasonable to you?

Thank You,

JL

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Greetings JL -

Congratulations on your Lincoln purchase and also your purchase of the Manual. The Manual will pay for itself many times over.

After reading your post a few times and realizing that we both may have no knowledge of any previous repairs to your fuel system, an inspection of the fuel sender and pick-up tube is indeed a good place to start. At Lincoln Land we have seen these units appear in our shop with all sorts of problems such as clogged tubes, tubes bent and out of alignment, severely corroded and leaking, etc.

These units are removed from inside the trunk and are usually easy to deal with. A complete inspection of the fuel lines and hoses as well as the fuel filter could be next on your list. If you do not uncover any problems with the any of the above items, contact us again for further suggestions. Good luck on a speedy repair.

Bill

1973 Carubetor Issues

Bill,

I just got a 1973 Lincoln Continental and I need to replace the carburetor. My question is there is not a tag on the carburetor on the car. I have had a time trying to find a good replacement, as I don't know the tag number. I have found a NOS carburetor for sale, the tag number on it is D5PE-AB, they say it's boxed as a CA688C, but see CA788C marked on the box in their picture. Would this work on my Lincoln? If not do you know of a supplier for a good replacement carburetor. Also where can I find a good cross reference for part numbers for items I may need down the road.

Thanks for your help,

LC
Ogden, UT

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LC -

Assuming that your 73 is original and complete with it's 4300 carburetor, any one from a 68-74 Lincoln with a 460CID engine should be OK as they are all basic 4300 series carburetors. The Part Number D5PE indicates a 1975 style which should be a 4350 series and will not fit. The CA688 and CA788 Part Numbers are early Motorcraft numbers and could be OK and perfectly fine but I do not know what these boxes actually contain. They could be defective, boxed wrong or someone's rejects, etc. I would consider overhauling my original if possible if a replacement cannot be found. If you would like to have cross reference catalogs, or any such information it would be wise to watch eBay, flea markets, etc. That material is out there but you may need to buy a package deal to get what you want. If we can assist you further in this matter please don't hesitate to contact us.

Bill

March 10, 2010

The Old Grind

Hi Bill,

I have a 1961 Lincoln Continental. I was having issues with the Fuel Pump, so I went through and changed the Fuel Pump, Pushrod, Fuel Filter, and all of the soft lines under the hood. It started right up with no problems. I drove it around for a few days, and everything worked fine.

My issue is after a couple days my battery managed to die, because my parking lights did not shut off. So I say, "I'll just charge my battery and everything will be OK" . Well, that's not the case. Upon trying to start the car with a fully charged battery, I hear a really loud grinding noise, and the car won't start. The grinding is so loud, it hurts ME to hear it. The starter is brand new and for the correct year. Any Ideas on what went wrong? Your help is greatly appreciated!

Thanks,

Emanuel
Santa Clara, CA

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Hi Emanuel -

Yes...... Sometimes the car hobby can really be a Grind. It is hard to tell from your E-mail if the noise is from the starter drive trying to engage to a bad ring gear on the flywheel or if the starter is actually cranking the engine and it is trying to start. Also, a battery that is only partly charged can cause the starter solenoid to buzz. Some noises are hard to describe to another person and so a buzz could described as a grind or a mash etc. Even though you are saying that the starter is new and the battery is in fact fully charged there is obviously something wrong. Because I can't be sure of the actual condition of the battery I would remove it and take it to a trusted auto parts store and have them evaluate it with their test equipment. After you are absolutely sure of the battery and the engine still emits a terrible noise as you describe during starting, you will need to determine if it is coming from the starter. If it is, the starter will need to be removed and inspected (new or rebuilt parts do fail). At this time the ring gear can also be seen and inspected with the starter removed. Keep us posted and contact us further if you do not find the problem.

Sincerely,

Bill

March 8, 2010

1970 Mark III Heater Core Headaches....

Hi Bill -

I have been working on my 1970 Mark III and have almost removed the cover under the hood where the heater core is located. It leaks and I want to either repair or replace it. I thought I would check out the evaporator as well. The manual I have been using tells me that there are two studs on the inside of the fire wall and that when I take the nuts and washers off, the evaporator can be removed. I have removed the glove compartment container and all I can see are wires, connectors and vacuum hose. Can you give me some direction on where to look for these studs? Also, what manual would you recommend for this repair?--maybe my manual does not show or tell me enough.

Thanks,

Gregg in Temple City, CA

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Hey Gregg -

The heater core leaks are popular but the evaporators have proven to be durable. If you would like to remove yours there are indeed two studs located under the dash as explained in the FoMoCo manuals that we sell and recommend. For your convenience we are including an attached picture from the 69 Mark III manual that shows these studs. If you require any further information or any parts etc., please don't hesitate to contact us.

Sincerely,

Bill

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March 2, 2010

72 Mark IV Sure-Track Concerns

I am considering purchasing a '72 Mark IV that I test drove today from a local dealer. It has an issue that I would like some information about, though. The "Sure-Track" light is on in the instrument cluster.....I understand that it is brake related, but what would cause the light to be on, the brakes seemed to work pretty well.

Thanks,

Tom C.

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Hi Tom,

That light usually illuminates because of a hydraulic pressure differential between the front and rear brakes and could indicate a leak or a bad master cylinder. To prove that this switch is in fact turning on the warning light because of a problem you can unplug the wiring at the switch and observe if the light remains on.

The switch and wires should be easily seen under the master cylinder in the brake line. If the light goes out, it may be indicative of a brake problem or that the switch is sticking after a previous repair. If the light remains on, you could be experiencing a problem with Sure Track module itself.

Brake procedures and warning light operations are outlined in the shop manual. If you need further information, parts or manuals please contact us at any time. Good luck.

Sincerely

Bill

February 25, 2010

Another Satisfied Customer.....

We recently saw a Post on the LCOC (Lincoln Continental Owner's Club) from another satisfied customer here at Lincoln Land, it's always nice when someone stops and takes the time to acknowledge our efforts to keep all these classic Lincolns on the road - so we thought we'd share....

Bill

I know exactly where you're coming from, having had a lot of frustrations with power steering pumps myself. Don't want to go through all that right now, but I finally got smart (and shelled out some bucks) and had Lincoln Land rebuild my pump.

I'm very happy with it, it has no leaks, groans or other problems. It's as good as new and will last forever with how much (or how little) I drive. Long story short, I wouldn't even think of doing anything else right now.

You may find out the same thing once you installed yours, after a while, you just forget about it. The key is to have a specialist like Lincoln Land do the work. From my experience, anything else is a waste of money (learned that the very hard way).

Regards, Dirk

February 24, 2010

1963 Continental Fuel Pump Issues

Hello Bill,

I have a 63 Continental. The previous owner had installed a small pump that runs along the undercarriage of the car to deliver the fuel to the engine. He said that it was common for these cars not to get enough fuel through the factory fuel pump; he mentioned that the Thunderbird had the same issue.

The pump is activated by a switch inside the car, if I turn it off the car starts to shut down. Does this mean that this pump is the only way the car is getting fuel, and not through the regular fuel pump or sending unit? Your suggestions would be helpful. Should I live with it, after all it works. Or should I correct it to what it should be. Or what is the problem with the car not getting enough fuel on its own without the help from this pump?

Thanks you for your thoughts!

Robert

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Greetings Robert -

Yes it does sound as if your electric pump is the only source of fuel supply for the engine. The original fuel pump set up on that engine did indeed have some unique problems. These problems and any other concerns however are easy to overcome with proper upkeep of the vehicle. That is to say "address concerns as soon as they appear".

Assuming that your Lincoln has all of its original fuel system equipment I would restore it as the primary fuel supply and keep the electric pump as a back up. Many of our Lincoln friends do this and it works out very well. At Lincoln Land we normally stock the necessary parts and manuals for the fuel system restoration for your car.

Please contact us for further information regarding this matter and we will be pleased to supply you with any parts, information and help that you may require.

Sincerely,

Bill

1961 Continental Fuel Pump Concerns

Hi Bill,

I recently purchased a 1961 Lincoln Continental convertible for my business to use for wedding chauffeur service. It is a beautiful white convertible that has some real appeal for weddings. The car has a recently rebuilt 430 engine (<3000 miles) and most of the components on it have been rebuilt or replaced with new parts. When I bought the car it had a Holley electric fuel pump providing the fuel to the otherwise stock fuel system and carburetor. The fuel pump is located inside the engine bay on the driver-side fender near where the fuel lines enter the engine bay. The Holley was pushing the fuel through the original Carter 3 port fuel pump which was still on the engine, but the push rod had been removed. When I drove the car from Georgia (where I purchased it) to Dallas Texas, I noticed every time I would stop somewhere for a few minutes (10 to 30 minutes), when I would start the car back up, it would start just fine, but after a minute or two the car would sputter and die. Then it would be very hard to start, and acted and smelled like a flooded engine. I had to hold the pedal down and crank it over many times with the throttle opened wide before it would finally sputter and start. Once it was restarted it ran fine, but it would darn near deplete the battery each time I had to start it that way. Also the fuel pump would be quite noisy after retorting (possible cavitation). So it definitely seemed like a vapor lock or heat soak related issue as the car started perfectly every time when cold.

When I got the car back to Dallas I disabled the electric pump (by disconnecting the wire) and put in a new push rod for the mechanical pump. I also rebuilt the fuel pump with a kit I purchased from you guys. When I put the rebuilt pump back in the car along with the new pushrod, initially the car would not start. So I plugged in the electric pump to "prime" the mechanical pump. I then disconnected the electrical pump and the car started like a champ. I turned the car on and off several times in the garage and the mechanical pump seemed to work fine. A week or so later I drove the car to a friends place and after talking with him for 20 minutes I came out started the car and left. About 2 minutes down the road it sputters and dies. Same problem, but now with the mechanical pump. I also have noticed that the car smells strongly of gasoline when it is parked hot. Now my question to you is how to best remedy this problem.

Here are some other things I observed that may be relevant. When I rebuilt the fuel pump, I noticed in the shop manual that the original fuel pump is supposed to have a thermostatic valve installed behind the third (return port fitting) on the fuel pump. Mine did not have this thermostatic valve. I also noticed the rebuild kit did not have one. Is this valve needed? Also all my fuel lines are rubber from the fender to the pump to the carburetor. Should I use metal lines instead? Would using a phenolic spacer under the carburetor help? Also could the air filter box valve be sticking and causing these kinds of problems? I noticed the air cleaner box looks like it is pulling air from the exhaust manifold area when the car is cold. I have not managed to check it yet hot.

Any how, because of the nature of my business I need this Lincoln to be very reliable. Brides are not happy when their get away car dies on the road in front of all their wedding guests. Any help is appreciated.

Chris

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Greetings Chris -

Problems such as you describe are sure no fun but I can assure you that when these cars were new and plentiful they did not drive around with such fuel and vapor lock type of symptoms. Your Lincoln appears to maybe have at this time more than its share though. Because you have recently purchased this vehicle it is more difficult for you to diagnose with limited maintenance history available. We always recommend restoring the original fuel delivery and carburetor to the original set up and using the electric pump as a backup only. You seemed to have begun doing this already.

The first item that I would address is the strong fuel smell. Any fuel leaks are not allowed and as you probably know, they can accelerate with devastating results. A complete fuel system inspection is in order by a technician who is well versed in such problems. If the fuel smell is from the carburetor for instance it may indicate that a carburetor cleaning and overhaul is overdue or that the fuel pressures are too high.

On the other hand if you have a rotted, cracked or corroded fuel line or hose, the pumps can draw in some air with the fuel when operating and then leak fuel when the engine is turned off. If the complete system is examined and evaluated as suggested above I am sure that you will find some easy to repair faults.

To answer your specific questions, the thermostatic valves are recommended and always in place on any pumps or vehicles that we deal with. Proper coded rubber fuel lines are allowed because of the necessary flexibility that is needed between the body and the engine.......but for the most part steel lines are used on the engine from the pump to the carburetor because of durability and heat. The carburetor should have all of the original spacers and air intake systems.

After reading the above Chris please contact us for further specific information and I am sure that we can help get you back on the path of happier driving.

Sincerely,

Bill

February 19, 2010

1979 Lincoln Town Car Vinyl Top Removal

Bill -

I don't know how you feel about modifying a stock Lincoln. Mine is black with a white top. I'd like to remove my vinyl top and just go with a painted roof. My white top is in good shape and I could just have it painted or dyed black but I'd prefer a vinyless top. I'm wondering what's under the top. Are the body seams filled or not. Will the window trim for a car with vinyl top mount flush with the roof with the vinyl removed?

Mike

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Greetings Mike -

Personally I wouldn't touch a factory vinyl top that is in "good shape". Generally though the seams are only roughly prepared for the vinyl top cars at the factory but of course there is always is the exception. The rear window mouldings are very likely different I am told but we would probably have the correct ones in stock for you if required. I would recommend that you also consult a local upholstery or body shop as well. Good luck with your project.

Sincerely,

Bill

January 29, 2010

How Many Pumps On The Pedal Is Too Many?

HI Bill,

I have a 1979 Mark V Collector's Series, starts and runs great. A year ago after sitting a week it took 12 gas pedal pumps to start. This year, when it sits for a week, it takes up to 25 pumps and then starts and runs great. I can live with this, but it sounds like a problem in the making. What do you think?

Thanks,

John

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Hi John -

Yikes,... if they all started like that we would all have sore right ankles. Not knowing your car, it sounds like the basic tune up items should be examined first.

Without starting the engine, begin with a cold engine and the air cleaner top off and observe if the choke butterfly closes completely and with a definite action on the FIRST pump of the accelerator. Then look inside the carburetor while pumping the linkage and observe the underside of the choke for fuel spraying into the lower part of the carburetor. I trust that your fuel is fresh. If you have poor fuel delivery you must consider the condition of the fuel filter and fuel pump, etc. Repair any items that prove faulty during the above tests.

If all of the above is satisfactory then you may need to examine the spark plugs and wiring as well as possibly the complete ignition system. Because we at Lincoln Land don't know the condition of your engine or its history of repairs and maintenance, only the technician on scene with your car can determine the exact correct path to take. By the sound of your description though it does sound to me without being there that it is only a simple sticking choke problem. In this business however we have learned that - "It ain't over till it's over". Good Luck on a real speedy repair.

Sincerely,

Bill, Chris and all of the Guys and Gals at Lincoln Land

January 21, 2010

1969 Mark III Heater Issues

Bill -

I have a 1969 Mark III, the air conditioner works okay but when I attempt to change the temperature I get absolutely no heat or temperature change. The system works in defrost also but with no heat at all. The water valve to the heater core stays open when I call for heat. Any ideas?

R.J.

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Greetings R.J.,

Assuming that your car has the more popular Automatic Temperature Control option I can tell you that it is a great system but can be complicated to diagnose and repair without the proper Manuals.

The most likely cause of your problem is a failure that is located inside of the ATC box that has caused the system to drive to the full cooling mode and remain in this mode regardless of the position of your control. A less likely failure could be the sensor string (these are sensors that are in a series circuit with the driver's control that send temperature information to the ATC box so that it can react to deliver the correct air temperature, etc. to the car's interior as selected). A broken wire in this string will send the system into the full Heat but a shorted wire or sensor will send it into the full Cooling position.

Other easier to check possibilities are as follows....Heater core bypassed due to coolant leak at core, Heater core completely plugged, water valve plugged on the inside or water valve incorrect. The main control switches can also be at fault but their failure is rare. Another thought to consider if you do not have much history on the car is the possibility that a previous owner or his technician may have tried some unknown ill advised repair and has altered the system in an unknown manner. This can and does happen.

It may be of interest to know that when these systems were new it proved to be a challenge for the FoMoCo and the dealer technicians such as myself to learn the diagnostic and repair techniques. Proper diagnosis is half the battle. Now forty years later we are learning something new almost every day at Lincoln Land when it comes to repairing the earlier electronic systems such as this is.

The real good news is that we at Lincoln Land have all of the parts and supplies to repair your ATC as well as the ability to rebuild your ATC box and Servo. If you are doing your own repairs, we can supply you with the very necessary and highly recommended shop manuals for your Mark III. We wish you a quick and easy repair.

Sincerely,

Bill and the Lincoln Land staff

January 18, 2010

1978 Continental Concerns

Greetings Bill,

I currently live in Seattle and drive my Lincoln at least once a day. The engine has 116K actual miles and runs like a champ. In the mornings, or when it is cold the engine fires with one turn of the ignition no problem, starts every time. Upon warming the vehicle up it smokes a slight bit. It isn't burning off coolant, so I don't think it's the head gasket and the smoke doesn't smell burnt either and typically burns off after a couple of minutes and then nothing.

Also after I drive the vehicle for awhile and the engine is up to temp if I start the engine it takes a while to turn over but only when it's hot not cold which doesn't make sense to me. You figure it would be the opposite.

I have a few questions:

1) What do you think is generating the smoke?
2) Why does my engine start better cold then warm?

As always thank you for your help.

Sincerely,

Justin

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Hi Justin -

Your engine condition and tune up situation should be evaluated by a competent technician. Some engines at 116,000 miles are like new, and others may have worn engine parts depending on their previous use and maintenance. Your problems may only be caused by simple maladjusted components or possibly worn engine parts (valve seals, rings etc.). Only a person on scene with your car can determine this. I would approach each problem separately and with the proper manuals at my side.

Good Luck....

Bill

January 7, 2010

1978 Mark V Questions

Hi Bill -

I have a 78' Continental Mark V Bill Blass Edition with the 400ci Engine.

1) Is this engine a "Cleveland V8" similar but bigger ci to 351 Ford V8's of the 70's?

2) Does it take the same oil filter cartridge as other Fords.(In Australia we call this "Z9")

3) I can't find the oil pressure sender switch, where is it located??

Chris
Gold Coast, Qld.Australia.

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Hi Chris -

Congrats on your Bill Blass...... nice car.

The 400 engine in that car is usually associated with the 351 M engine as discussed in the shop manual. We don't compare it with the Cleveland style engine. Specialty engine shops may have more explicit info. available for you in that regard.

The oil pressure switch should be located to the rear of the carburetor, on top of the engine - and slightly to the right (White with Red Stripe single wire female connector).

The oil filter is the same as the other engines of that era and that would be the popular Motorcraft Part Number FL1 style. We only use this quality Ford brand at Lincoln Land. This filter type is also available from many other suppliers under other brand names and qualities.

If you need any other information, etc., please don't hesitate to contact us and in the meantime enjoy your Mark.

Sincerely,

Bill

December 22, 2009

A World Of Information Is Only A Click Away....

Greetings Lincoln Lovers -

For the last several years George R. Miller, our resident computer "Go to Guy" and Webmaster has been constructing a great parts information site for you. When parts are needed you are now able to find and see most of the parts that you need and be able to advise us exactly what you need to order. This translates to less mistakes and disappointments.

The site also contains a wealth of information regarding your Lincoln that you may have thought about and wanted to know such as options, specs and other hard to find tidbits. If you haven't browsed this site as yet, give it a try.... And be sure to check back often as the site is updated daily.

Sincerely,

All of the Guys and Gals at Lincoln Land

December 8, 2009

78 Mark Door Ajar Light, Power Door Lock Issues

Hi Bill,

Once again I could use some advice on my Lincoln. You've helped me in the past and I trust your opinion.

The Door Ajar light is stuck on and the driver's side door doesn't lock either with the key or the power lock control. The power lock control does however work on the passenger side. I'm curious if the problems are related and if you think I have a bad switch on that side or the power lock component doesn't work for the driver's side. Also is this a part I should by new or used if that is the case.

Justin

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Hi Justin -

To answer your Shop Manual question first, yes we can arrange to send to your address a set of 1978 manuals hot off the press. Another benefit of the manuals is that if you ever sell your car and the manuals are included in the sale, they become a selling feature to the buyer. George will e-mail you with the details.

As for your power door lock problem, your description sounds like the Door Lock Actuator has gone south and is now seized. If so the key will not operate the lock and the door lock switch will only operate the right side as you describe. The Door Open warning switch is also located within this lock assembly as well and it can be inspected for damage at the same time that the actuator is replaced. The above conjecture is based on our experience. The good news Justin is that we have new Actuators available whenever you have finally diagnosed your problem. Let us know the results and feel free to contact us for further information.

Wishing you Good Luck,

Bill and the Lincoln Land Staff

November 30, 2009

78 Mark Keeps Breaking Alternator Belts

Greetings Bill,

I have a simple but odd problem which I'm wondering if you've run into.

I've gone through three alternator belts in the last month. I drive the car for about two weeks then I start getting a squeal. By then it's too late and I break yet another belt. I'm following all the necessary precautions and putting the belt on correctly. I make sure there is ¼ inch give on the belt so it's plenty tight and it doesn't seem to loosen over time. I'm wondering if maybe I have some cheap after market alternator that is creating the problem or something else. Have you ever heard of such an issue? I've worked on plenty of vehicles and I know that I'm putting the belt on correctly so I figured this might be a Ford thing??

Thanks,

Justin

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Justin -

That sure sounds like a real fun time. Assuming that you are using a good quality automotive belt and not an F.H.P. (Fractional Horsepower Belt) and you have already checked the pulley alignment and any other obstructions etc. I would do the following. After driving the car for 10-20 miles with another new belt I would remove it and spin all of the pulleys by hand that this belt operates on. You will be checking for seizing bearing components during this test. Also very important is to NOT over tighten any belt. Let us know the results.

Sincerely,

Bill

November 23, 2009

New 1973 Owner Questions About Fuel

Hi Bill!

I bought a 1973 Lincoln Continental 3 months ago and I have a question about the fuel I should be using. I heard that they stared making cars with different valve seats to run on unleaded fuel in about 1973. I was just wondering... on the air filter housing it says "regular gasoline" but no where does it say "unleaded" not even under the gas cap, or on the door. I mean back then in '73 cars running on unleaded fuel was a new thing. That's why I think that my '73 Lincoln should run on leaded gas, but I could be wrong. Do you know it for sure if it runs on leaded or unleaded.

Thanks,

Steve


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Hi Steve -

Your 73 will do just fine with today's unleaded regular fuel. Ford started installing case hardened valve seats in 1972 on all cars in North America in order to use the new unleaded offerings. If you search the archives here you will find a previous post on the subject. Congrats on your 73 and welcome to the world of Lincoln. You can count on Lincoln Land for any advice or products that you may need in the future.

Sincerely,

Bill

November 18, 2009

1978 Mark V Issues

Hello Bill,

I have a 78 Lincoln Mark V with a trunk leak. The leak appears to be coming from the topside upper left but I just can't seem to pinpoint the leak. My Uncle said it was the left drain plug but I replaced that and it did no good. I also tried caulking the left side window. The trunk seal seems to be in great shape. Someone told me to climb in the trunk with a flashlight to find the leak but that was useless as well. My Dad also mentioned some drain tube on the older models but I don't know where to look for this. Any suggestions would be great.

Also my "Miles to Empty" digital reader is working intermittently. Is this difficult to replace? Where would I track this part down and can I repair myself?

Finally where can I locate a cheap factory manual for the car or where is the cheapest source. I love my new Lincoln and want to take good care of her.

Oh and one other question. I bought this Lincoln with 116K miles. Should there be any necessary routine maintenance I should perform at this stage?

Thanks man and have a great one.

Respectfully,

Justin

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Hi Justin,

Tracing water leaks on cars can be time consuming and disappointing at times. Water can enter a car at one point and show up several feet away. Some leaks show up only after the car wash and others only appear after a light but steady rain. The best way to diagnose is to apply water to the suspected area from the bottom and working up. A popular and possible leak on your car could be at the rear window area. To trace a leak in this area, water can be applied to the rear window (lightly) with the trunk open. Excess water will drain out at the trunk gutters during this test as designed while someone in the trunk watches for the leak to appear inside the trunk. This whole procedure requires patience. This is why many owners take their cars to a body shop for this problem.

The Miles to Empty modules are not repairable apparently. We have used ones available, but have found that they can be unreliable in many cases. Furthermore - the problem may be in other items - such as the Fuel Sending Unit itself. In the future we may have a good but fix for this problem but at this moment we cannot offer you anything that would be acceptable to you, or us. I hope you appreciate our honesty in this matter.

We only recommend and sell the proper FoMoCo manuals for your car. We find that anything less does not measure up to our standards. These of course are not the cheapest, but the money spent can easily be recovered during the first repair in many cases. The necessary maintenance schedules are show in the Shop Manuals and the Owners manuals. Please contact us further for any manuals or parts that you may require.

Sincerely,

Bill

November 12, 2009

1982 Continental Concerns

Hi Bill,

I was hoping you could offer me some advice!

I recently acquired a 1982 Continental. It was hard starting when cold, however started fine after warm up. I took it in to a mechanic, who rebuilt the carb and reinstalled it, but now it seems to idle high and is running rich, and it still starts hard! Not as bad as before, but still a hard start just the same.

In addition, the tranny now seems to not shift when it should. Did the mechanic miss or overlook and adjustment? Thanks in advance!

Jeannie


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Hello Jeannie,

Maintaining a car can sometimes be super frustrating. Have you spoken to your mechanic about the possibility of some further carburetor adjustments or if any transmission controls are not connected under the hood? Since you have only recently acquired your car you probably do not know its maintenance history. For this reason I would also check and replace if necessary the basic tune up items such as spark plugs and wires The proper operation of these parts are important for good starting and running of the engine and for transmission shifting. If these parts are already in good working order, then the diagnosis becomes a hands on procedure and I would strongly recommend a shop manual for this. On your car there are many electronic and vacuum control parts that manage the engine and emission operation and for this reason I cannot suggest to you the failure of any one component. A good well versed technician will have the correct manual and equipment at his side and should be able to correct the problem. If you do need a shop manual set or any further advice etc., please do not hesitate to contact us. In any event please let us know the results.

Sincerely,

Bill

November 11, 2009

1970 Mark Wiper Issues

Bill -

I have just purchased a 1970 Mark III Lincoln Continental and the hydraulic wipers only go halfway then stop.

Are there any tricks I should know? Are there any recommended operating pressures out of the pump that I could check etc.?

Regards,

Mark


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Hi Mark -

That wiper system is an excellent system. It is silent and powerful but can be a pain when they fail. Because you have recently purchased your Mark and have no history on the wipers I think that you should check the cable adjustment first. This easy adjustment is located behind the access panel at the firewall hydraulic inlet and outlet. Removing the screws and sliding the panel down the lines (no need to undo the hydraulics) should reveal the cable adjustment. Adjust it so that the cable is moving the operating lever to its extreme speed position when the control on the dash is turned to high. There certainly can be other problems but this is a good, easy and inexpensive place to start. Please let us know how it works out or contact us for further information.

Wishing you good luck.....

Bill

November 9, 2009

Mark III Window Motors

Hi Bill,

It's Gregg again with the 1970 Mark III. I have a couple of questions about the window motors for this car. I've just taken apart the right front door in order to replace the window motor. I did this on the left front and everything works fine there. I was wondering are these two motors interchangeable right door to left door and can they be rebuilt? I'm going to have to do work on the rear windows as well and I'm wondering if the rear motor units would be interchangeable as well. Thanks for the info on the headlight doors; I have a tech manual for 69 to 71 Mark III and am getting ready to run vacuum checks.

Appreciate you being there.

Gregg


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Hey Gregg -

Glad to hear that you are "en route" with the vacuum headlamp door problem. On your Mark, unfortunately the window motor assemblies are not interchangeable as the "Gear Ends" are symmetrically opposite (left and right). You can take yours apart if you like and service them etc. We do not offer this service at Lincoln Land at this time because we have new assemblies available at very reasonable prices. Except for the rear quarter windows, our new ones are complete with new gears as well. It is a real pleasure to have the electric windows working nicely and I wish you "easy fixes". Contact us at any time for further information and prices.

Sincerely -

Bill

September 14, 2009

1982 Town Car Maintenance Questions

Hi Bill,

I have an 82 Lincoln Town Car with a 302, 5.0, CFI engine. I just want to know where the choke pull off is located so I can change it. Had it diagnosed, and along with the EGR valve, this was also a problem. I have the new EGR valve, but don't want to install it untill I can replace the choke pull off. Would you be able to help me out? Haynes Maintenance Manual doesn't tell me too much.

Robert -

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Hello Robert -

The Ford manual for your Lincoln is very good at discussing the choke pull-off. It should be located behind the choke coil on the rt. side of the carb and is vacuum operated. It will have a single vacuum line attached to it and may be described in some manuals by a slightly different name that also refers to the choke. Both of those parts that you are replacing are popular and will contrbute to a poorly performing engine when they fail. If we can help you with any of these parts or if you would like to have a copy of the correct Manuals for your Town Car, don"t hesitate to contact us at any time. Many Lincoln owners tell us that the manuals pay for themselves during the first repair. Good luck to you on a speedy repair.

Sincerely,

Bill

September 9, 2009

Retrofitting The Old Station Wagon

Dear Uncle Bill,

I am in the middle of purchasing a 1967 Country Squire wagon and am
interested in knowing how hard it would be to retro-fit it with a
tilt-away wheel. It is my understanding that this feature was
available in 1967, 68 and 69, and that the way it worked (hardware) was
different on all 3 years. Whaddaya think?

Also, I have noted that some 1967 Ford wagons have vents on the door
panels and some do not - I am aware that Ford introduce a flow thru
ventilation that year, and the ones with the vents had little black
flaps on the door jamb below the latching mechanism. Do you know
anything about this?? Why some do and some don't have the vents??

See you soon,

Carter

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Carter -

I have no "for sure" knowledge on the tilt or tilt away steering wheel retro-fit but I would suppose if you had a donor from the same year and car it can be done. You would need to change ALL of the necessary parts of course. Keep in mind that the collapsible steering columns appeared in 68 and therefore I would think only a 67 would be at all possible.

As for the flo-thru vent system, I would surmise that it was installed on FoMoCo's High End cars only such as all Lincolns and T-Birds, Mercury Marquis, Ford LTDs and Squire wagons etc. but not on any base models. Take care Carter.

See you in Florida....

Bill

August 27, 2009

1997 Town Car Suspension Issue

I have a 1997 Lincoln Town Car that I love. Recently the rear of car has dropped significantly. What is causing this?

Thanks,

Gary

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Gary,

Your Lincoln was equipped with air ride in the rear suspension when new. Yours probably has the original system and now needs service at this time. The rear air springs cannot last forever and do in time develop leaks. If they are not replaced in a short time after starting to leak, the air compressor will most definitely fail as well because of "overworking" to compensate for the leaking air springs.

The above are two of the most common failures but there is also the possibility of the suspension computer failing or even something small like an underhood relay,fuse or a sensor link at the rear axle becoming disconnected etc. When you take it for service, be sure to find out if that shop is experienced with diagnosis and repair of this suspension. This suspension is extremely reliable in most cases and will provide many years of service. If however you wish to convert to conventional coil springs, kits are readily available for such a conversion. Lincoln Land has such kits available as well as NEW high quality air suspension parts in stock to return your suspension back to new condition. Please contact us anytime at Lincoln Land for any further information that you may need.

Good luck!
Bill

August 14, 2009

Flushing Liquids...... Neglected Maintenance

Dear Friends -

At Lincoln Land we have many customers arriving with their cars who are concerned with radiator leaks, heater core leaks and engine frost plug leaks etc. Many times we find that the cooling system has needed cleaning and flushing years ago. Their engine has been on the verge of overheating many miles ago and their heating system has been performing less than mediocre at best. The time to flush and renew the coolant and other liquids in your car is "right now" while all systems are performing really well. This applies to the automatic transmission, the brake system and the power steering system etc. In the long run, doing so can save you a lot of money and could ensure that these items will operate at their optimum as they did when you purchased the car. Of course these parts can fail as a normal failure even when serviced properly, but at least you will know that it was not because of neglect etc. on your part.

Choosing and following a schedule of regular "preventative maintenance" on the above systems of your car is one of the best pieces of advice that anyone can give to you and could very well pay off big time in the long run. We wish you all many miles of pleasant driving with your Lincoln.

Sincerely,

Bill and all of the Guys and Gals at Lincoln Land

July 8, 2009

1959 Window Issues

Hi Bill -

I have a 1959 Lincoln 4 door that the rear window won't go down. It will go down about 1 inch and it stops, it lookes like it might be off its track, but not sure how I should start to tear it down to fix. Any help would be appreciated.

Thanks,

Jay

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Hello Jay -

Whether this problem is your door window, or the large retractable rear vent glass - you will need to expose the lower mechanical mechanism in order to inspect for loose, seized or broken parts etc.

At this time it will surely need a real good lubrication of all moving parts and rollers as well. If you need any literature for any panel and parts removal, we usually have a good supply available as well as hardware and motor parts. If you do need further assistance please don't hesitate to contact us at Lincoln Land.

Good Luck,

Bill


June 30, 2009

65 Turn Signals and Valve Concerns

Bill,

We have a1965 Lincoln which is being restored by my son. The turn signals won't work could it be the flasher or bad bulbs or something else also do we have to replace the stock valves to burn todays unleaded gas.

Thank You,

The Wolfman

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Hi Wolfman -

Turn signals....Ya gotta have em.

The turn signal flasher is a good possibility and a good place to start to look for a problem. It should be located behind the dash in the instrument cluster above the steering column. The power runs through the flasher and up the column to the t. s. switch via a blue wire. You could start by testing at this blue wire with a test light. If there is no power there with the key on, then the flasher is suspect. If there is power on this blue wire up the column to the switch the t.s. sw. itself is a good candidate. I strongly advise a wiring diagram and service manual as they can save hours of guess work and time.

As for the valves and unleaded fuel you may hear many opinions but the short answer is that for the most part no problems really occurred to any of us in the old car hobby that I am aware of. In 1972 Fo.Mo.Co and others began installing Case Hardened Valve Seats on the heads of their engines to handle unleaded fuel. The valves themselves are allready hardened. Back then we were all "scared" into believing that the valve seats on all of our older cars would soon recede into the heads and all kinds of roughness and problems would appear. We were told that we would need to remove the heads on our cars and have them all modified s.a.p. This never happened. I own four Lincolns dating from 1954 to 1970 and have experienced NO problems of this type. It is generally understood though that some valve seat recession could be measured if pre 1972's are driven with heavy loads at sustained and constant high speeds. This is our experience at Lincoln Land and of course we would welcome any other opinions and experiences. Good luck with your restoration!

Cheers,

Bill

June 24, 2009

Considering A 1966 Convertible

Bill,

Great website and blog. I have been in the market for a 66 Continental Convertible for about a year. I have watched your site, eBay, local papers, a few auctions, etc. There are a few I have my eye on but this is my first classic car purchase. I am looking to find one that is "done" or has been restored to a nice condition. I want a driver but something of high quality. Outside of the normal items to consider when purchasing a classic car, is there anything in particular to look for on a 66 convertible that I should pay special attention to?

Many thanks in advance!

Sam

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Hello Sam -

Relating to your "Wants" in a car is kind of easy for me because the Lincolns that I have owned forever are for the most part well maintained presentable drivers (no ground up restorations). One thing that I should be clear on though is that there really is no Daily or Weekend Driver car that is ever "done". Any car that is lovely in all respects with all systems operative will develop problems and will require repairs sooner or later. I'm sure that you knew that anyway. The Lincoln Continental 4dr. Convertible is a great choice and is a well respected and sought after vehicle among car lovers and collectors. As you know, these cars have options and special appointments that were and still are "unique". When looking for one, you need to make sure that All of these options and appointments are working as designed or the car will have plenty of "Down" time which I think you do not want. It would certainly help if you knew the car and or the owner but this is usually not too likely. These are unibody cars with the Quarter panels and Fenders welded and leaded in place. Watch for poor workmanship here as well as evidence of a bad crash. The under body should be inspected for excess or poorly patched areas. All areas of these cars such as a/c, upholstery,exhaust, power steering and bright metal mldgs and chrome etc. are somewhat more costly on these cars than ordinary cars. So in order for you not to be dissappointed in your search for the "high quality driver" you may be many dollars ahead to have an expert of these cars inspect any candidate that you may find. I sure didn't intend to ramble on here but we at Lincoln Land have in the past encountered many new buyers that were somewhat dissappointed when they learned from us that their purchase should have had a much closer inspection. If you follow some of these suggestion, I am confident that you will find the exact car that you are looking for and if you need further assistance please do not hesitate to contact us.

Sincerely,

Bill


June 11, 2009

Easy Tip To Save Wear And Tear On Steering Linkage

Hi everyone,

Chris always advises that when manoeuvering your pride and joy in tight places such as parking etc. try to avoid turning the steering wheel with the car stationary. When possible try to have the car moving slightly during slow speed turns. When turning the steering with the vehicle stationary there is much more pressure needed to turn the wheels and therefore increasing the wear and tear on the steering components. Of course there are many situations when this cannot be avoided. That is why we always have new steering linkage parts available for you.

We like to steer you right

Bill

May 20, 2009

1965 Running Issues

Hello Bill

I have A 1965 Lincoln Continental and the idle seems a little low, but before I start adjusting it I hope you could answer a question.

I bought the car in Colorado and I live in Chicago. I saw a show on TV where a car was transported to Colorado and it would not start very easy or stay on for that matter. On the show they figured out the carb needed to be rejetted because of the altitude, I was wondering if I need to rejet the carb for the altitude change in Chicago?

Also what grade gas should I be using? The last time I filled it up I used premium gas, I just tried to start it up yesterday and it was hard to start, and if I let off the gas it would die out. Wondering if the gas had anything to do with it ?

Thanks your for time -

Art from Chicago


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Greetings Art -

Before considering changing any calibrations on the engine or carburetor I would first make sure that what I have now is in top shape. I am refering to spark plugs,wiring, points and condenser, vacuum advance, choke operation,timing and fuel filter etc. Another item to consider is that with age the damper on the crankshaft pulleys are known to slip and give a false timing reading. If the car is new to you and you do not know its history, it may also at sometime had some old gas in the tank etc. and messed up the carb. Most of the above is normal necessary "Old Car Care stuff" that you are probably allready aware of. Your 65 was designed to take full advantage of Premium fuel only. Getting back to your question on jets,if you can find and send to us the carburetor tag# and the info. from the tag on the driver's door we may be able to tell you the size jets that the carb. had when new and also possibly what area of the country that the car was delivered to from FoMoCo. when it was new. I certainly hope that the above helps you and please keep us posted if you need any other advice or any of our other services.

Sincerely,


Bill and the Lincoln Land Guys and Gals

May 13, 2009

Update on the 1979 Mark V Garage Door Opener Question

Lincoln owner Brian has stepped forward and made his successfull GDO experiences available to us in regard to this 30 year old Lincoln factory option on his car. We are posting it on the blog in its entirety with hopes that it may be helpfull to John and others who wish to have this option operating on their Lincoln. Please be advised however that we here at Lincoln Land of course have no method to verify or guarantee its success. Brian,we certainly thank you for being kind enough to offer this information to your fellow Lincoln enthusiasts. Also at this time Chris reminds me that we have a number of GDO parts available for any Lincolns with that option. Thanks Gentlemen.

Sincerely,

Bill

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Hey Bill,

NEVER ASSUME: "30 years later, any of this knowledge is no longer available!" Image Blocked

In reference to the question posed about the GDO on the 79 Collector's Series: Yes, this was a dealer prepped option...Behind the visor (right side) there is a small device with dip switches. The switch configuration was noted on a sticker that came on the original Driver's Vanity mirror. This was then matched with the dip switches IN the Wall Receiving Unit that came from the dealer.



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Match the ON/OFF configuration to BOTH Visor and Wall Unit.

If you can provide your client with the original Lincoln Wall Unit that came from the dealer, he can open up the visor behind the mirror and set the switches himself to match the receiving unit or change it to anything he prefers as long as they BOTH match. He can then wire the Wall Receiving Unit to his existing GDO. This would allow him to use his original GDO button AND the Lincoln unit. If you have a complete NOS unit, the instructions are in the box. If not, I can provide your client with a copy or explain it to him in greater detail if you wish.

Originally this was intended as a wall unit that took the place of the GDO button usually found next to your entry door, however I wired mine so that the Lincoln unit was wired directly to the opener, leaving my existing wiring untouched. It is VERY simple. Just make sure that the original antenna is connected to the Lincoln unit. With the Wall Unit placed on the ceiling and closer to the front of the garage, this will also help give a better range for opening.



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NOTE: I secured the plug to the outlet plate with a HEAVY DUTY zip strap because of the weight,
It will fall otherwise.


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The WHITE wires are attached to the opener from the Lincoln Wall Unit. The BEIGE wires are from original garage door. My opener is a 2000 Lift Master.

ONE IMPORTANT SIDE NOTE: Most, if not all New GDO's have a rolling security code system that automatically changes the codes every time the button is pushed. The old Lincoln unit does not have that feature. The downside: loss of security because of the single code used. The possible upside: no one would ever expect that a unit so old would still be active.

Hope this is helpful. HAVE A GREAT DAY!

Brian

April 27, 2009

65 Power Window Issues

Hi Bill-

I have a great 65 Lincoln. Currently only drivers wing window
works and rear driver side window. I have a parts car with a functioning
master switch I installed still the same two windows working. Any ideas?

Thanks,

-Matt in Oregon

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Matt

Power windows can be real tricky and time consuming. If you are planning to do your own repairs you should have the appropriate manual for a 65 as well as at least a 12v test light. I would start by testing for power at the power window motor feed plugs of the non operating ones. This is why you need the wiring diagram in the manual. If you are not repairing the window operation yourself, your mechanic will be gratefull that you have a manual for him to use. At Lincoln Land we are able to test, rebuild or supply new switches for your 65 if you do require any. Those 65's by the way are real nice Lincolns. Keep us posted on your progress.

Sincerely

Bill

April 6, 2009

Timing Chain Controversy

Hi Bill,
I have a 67 Lincoln 2 door with the original 462 under the hood. I have read online and heard from different folks that I should replace the original nylon timing chain with a more reliable steel timing chain. I was wondering if this is worth spending the money on. I have not had any problems with the original timing chain, but I don't ever want to have any problems with it either. I also have other projects on the car that I feel might be a higher priority. I guess my question is, do I really need to replace it with a steel chain, and if so how soon do I need to worry about doing this? I have not had any performance issues so far, but if this is what I got to do than I will. Thanks for your help Bill.

Jon From Spokane

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Hello Jon

Your question is a good one as well as a controversial one. We too at Lincoln Land have seen many opposing opinions discussed "on line". There are many items to consider before you decide and it should be a personal decision based on your own needs. For instance your engine may have already had the timing gears and chain replaced or the engine was driven and maintained in such a way that the nylon is still in great shape. This can happen. Replacing the timing set requires the removal of other common problem items to consider replacement of such as water pump, power steering pump and seals and the engine vibration damper. It can even lead to wanting to remove the oil pan to clean it inside and maybe to even replace the oil pump "while you are there". Your statement that you do not want to ever have any timing chain problems can only result in one choice....replace it....but your other statement indicates that you don't want too if you don't need to. So you see it is a decision that you must make carefully based on your wants and needs and the history of your Lincoln in general. Please feel free to contact us to discuss it further at any time.

Sincerely

Bill


April 2, 2009

Sluggish Engine - Is It Time For An Overhaul?

Hi Bill,

My 1962 Lincoln is a very sluggish car. I used to have another 62
Lincoln and it had way more get up and go! I have done a few things
to help the car gain more power, but none of them have really done all
that much to help. I did a compression test and got the following
readings: 1) 130 2) 135 3) 135 4) 130 5) 125 6) 130 7) 125 8) 130
Here are the readings after oil was added to the cylinders1) 1402) 140
3) 140 4) 137 5) 125 6) 130 7) 135 8) 130
The compression in the shop manual is 180 +/- 20. I have some smoke
coming from the oil breather, but not tons of it. When the cap is on
it is really not all that noticeable. There is also a bit of smoke
coming from the valve covers. What could be causing such a large drop
in compression across the board that is so even? I am thinking it
could be the timing chain. Possibly a worn cam? Maybe a worn cam
gear? Exhaust valve seats messed up by unleaded fuel? What in your
opinion would be the most likely cause?

Thanks :)
Landon


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Hi Landon

Before jumping into an engine overhaul, did you make your tests with a warm engine? The engine should have been warm with the spark plugs out. If the above was done correctly I would address your "Very Sluggish" concern first by checking the following.... Fuel supply to carburetor.....Condition of plugs, points. and wiring.....Ignition Timing including the condition of the damper pulley. This pulley has the timing marks stamped on it and the outer part is known to slip on its damper rubber and thus indicate incorrect timing on your timing light....... The Vacuum Advance Unit on the distributor is also a very popular item to leak internally not be able to advance the timing at engine speeds above idle. The reason that I make the above suggestions first is that I think that this engine should have more power than you describe with this compression. If all of the above is absolutely verified to be correct and you still believe that your engine is just "worn out" and that a complete rebuild is in your future, then I would have its internal condition ascertained by a competent on hand mechanic.

Sincerely and the best of luck to you

Bill


March 3, 2009

Dale's Dillemas

Bill,

THANK'S for the Site.

My Driver's Mirror Thermostat is out of adjustment, It reads 40 to 50 degrees higher than normal temp on any given day. Can it be adjusted or is a rebuild necessary and if so by whom?

I know there are Vacum control devices for the Headlight's and other item's but I don't know where to look or get started...... The Door's stay open when not running. Is this normal?
Where may I purchase a Vacum Book in which to learn where thing's are.
This is my FIRST attempt on doing this type repair's on my First Lincoln..............
Oh...... by the way......... I am "Over the Hill".............

Dale


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Hi Dale

Very good questions. The outside thermometer of this era I am sorry to say have no known repair procedures at this time and we do not know of anyone who is repairing them as a service. The vacuum headlamp covers on the other hand are are a different matter. Your h/l vacuum covers will open sooner or later depending on the size and number of vacuum leaks in the system. Some are known to stay closed for weeks or more. The vacuum system can leak at any location where the vacuum is routed. If you are repairing this system yourself or having it repaired by your favourite shop, a set of service manuals is a must and will save you many $$$$'s and broken parts in the long run. However, some common places for leaks are Vacuum Cover Motors, H/L Switch, Vacuum check valve etc. etc. If you would like a set Shop Manuals please call Lincoln Land for more information. We can even discuss your Headlamp cover problem further at this time if you wish.

Cheers

Bill

February 19, 2009

1968 Automatic Temp Control Issue

Dear Uncle Bill,

The 68 sedan with auto. temp. is having a puzzling heat issue. When
the system is calling for heat in the "low" setting, everything inside the car seems to react as it should, outside the car, the hot water
control valve remains closed. As soon as the system is switched to
"high", the valve immed. opens and plenty of heat enters the car. (I
know; "don't push low") What are your thoughts?

Thanks - I do appreciate this blog!

Carter

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Hi Carter

We are glad that you appreciate the Lincolnland tech. blog. We try to keep it helpfull and easy to understand. Your ATC problem sounds like an electrical problem within the A.T.C. box. We would need to open it up here to verify this and then repair the issue. At the same time it is a good idea to go through all of the electrical inside the box and "tune it up" so that all functions will "snap to attention" for you. Give us a call any time when you are ready and we will arrange this for you. Will talk to you soon.

Bill @ Lincoln Land


February 9, 2009

Horn Relay location and power draw

Hello Bill,

I have a 1972 Lincoln Mark IV and I am having an issue with the horn relay.

It appears as though the battery charger was accidentently placed on the battery in reverse polarity for approx. 5 minutes before it was discovered. A replacement battery was installed and the car appears to run fine and all electronics appears to work also - good things.

Unfortunately the horns are now stuck and even after having the horn disconnected, the car battery drains. I have found a replacement horn relay but I can not find it's location to replace. Could you tell me where the horn relay is located and other tips to troubleshoot the battery drain issue.

Any help is appreciated.

Thanks,

Steve

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Hi Steve

In 1972 and other years,only cars with Speed Control used a horn relay. The relay for these vehicles should be located under the dash near the steering column on the same bracket as the Speed Control amplifier. Because you state that your horns are stuck "on" and you have a battery draw even with the horns unplugged, I am guessing that your horn switch is stuck on and is energizing the relay and causing your battery to discharge. This can be easily verified by disconnecting the wiring harness that is routed up the steering colum for the turn signals, horn, and speed control. I would check and elliminate this possibility first. Good luck and be sure to contact us for further info. or any parts that you might need.

Sincerely

Bill

January 23, 2009

Hard Start Several Days

Hi Bill,

I have a 1970 Lincoln Mark III and am having a drivability issue. If the car sits for more than one week without being started, you have to pump the gas about 10-20 times to get fuel into the carb. Once started, the motor runs horribly with very poor throtle response even when up to operating temperature. Howerver if you shut it off after warmup and let the car sit for 10-15 minutes, the car runs and drives great. I checked for vacuum leaks and could not find any. Any advice you have will be greatly appreciated.

Thanks, Patrick

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Hi Patrick

Before going any further on the hard starting I am assuming that the engine is properly tuned up in respect to plugs, high tension wiring, points and condenser and all of the correct adjustments to the above are in order. As well as proper ignition, the battery must be the correct size and fully charged and the starter must be in good order.Of course your fuel filter should be checked or replaced if that hasn't been done so in a while. If the above is in good order then you need to inspect your choke operation. Ideally the choke must be closed completely when the engine is cold and cranking. When the engine starts, the choke will open slightly as specified and then continue on to open completely as the engine warms up. An engine with poor choke operation will never start and idle properly when cold. All of these operations and specifications can be seen and explained in the available maintenance manual. I hope this helps you. Let us know if you need further assistance or any manuals.

Good luck

Bill

January 20, 2009

Mark III H/L Cover Question

Hello, just wanted to say that I appreitiate your blog. It help me to maintain my newly aquired 1969 Mark III. My first question about the headlight covers, open slowly after the car has been shut off. I do know that there are "check valves" that help in keeping them closed, but can those check valves still be bought ? or is there something else I'm missing ?

Ron

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Ron

Problems with vacuum headlamp covers opening too quickly when the engine is turned off is very common. The check valves are a common problem but are no longer available from Ford. At the moment we are supplying only good used ones from our parts cars. We are however pursuing a source for new ones and we hope to have a product available sometime in the near future. These valves are not the only common failures for these systems. Look also for leaks anywhere that the vacuum lines are routed to such as H/L door vacuum motors, H/L switch, vacuum reservoir and any of the vacuum hoses. A service manual is an excellent tool for you to use in diagnosing any vacuum or electrical concerns. Just as a side note of interest is that when these cars were new Ford advised us that it was normal and acceptable for the doors to remain closed for 24 hours. With patience though longer periods are achievable. If we can further assist you with any of these parts or manuals at any time please call Chris directly and mention your post on our blog.

Sincerely

Bill

January 13, 2009

CW's 73 problems

Dear Bill,

I am delighted to see your expertise and experience being integrated
into Lincoln Land! Congratulations!

I have a 73 Town Car with 27,000 miles on it in very fine condition. Two things; the "door ajar" light comes ON when the driver's door is closed properly, it goes off if the door IS ajar - bassackwards from what it should be - what do you suggest? Secondly, when the car is cold, the transmission shifts perfectly, when hot and under a load, it "shimmies" between 1st and 2nd, and also between 2nd and 3rd. I do not know when the last time the transmission was svc'd, if ever, and wonder if a fluid and filter change, maybe some conditioner might be of help.

Help!

Thanks and hope to see you in the late winter or early spring.

C.W.
Romney, WV

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Greetings CW

The switch for the door ajar light is actually located on each of the lock assemblies inside each of the doors. The switch inside of the door in question could have become loose or somehow broken and is grounding the circuit and therefore turning on the light at the wrong time. These switches are very simple copper straps that mount on to the locks in a certain position. The door trim panel and possibly the lock itself will have to be removed to properly see this operation and to replace or adjust this switch. As for the transmission, the fluid should be evaluated for condition. If you don"t know the history of the transmission servicing on the car, it is certainly a very good idea to service it as follows. Check the vacuum line to the trans. and repair if necessary. Drain all of the oil in the converter and the pan and check the pan for debris. Replace the filter if applicable and replace the shift modulator ( it is probably old ). If the fluid was in poor shape, the cooler and lines must be flushed. If the trans. still does not shift properly it will probably need resealing. If you are not doing this work yourself be sure to find a shop that you can trust. We look forward to your visit to Lincolnland.

Regards
Bill

January 5, 2009

430 Block thermostats

We got an interesting inquiry about the "Little Thermostats" in the block of one our Customer's 1961 Continental....

Bill,

When changing the water pump on 1961 430 engine, the 2 "little thermostats" behind it need to be changed. Have heard it is best to eliminate them, is that correct?

Thanks,

Joe

Thanks for the inquiry. At Lincolnland we believe in eliminating these thermostats for two reasons. They are known to cause overheating in modern day slow traffic on the hotter days. They are no longer available "new "and any available used may be of questionable condition to perform as designed. However the deverters in the block must be in excellent condition or new and installed correctly.
Regards
Bill

December 11, 2008

Maintaining your Lincolns


The best way to maintain Lincolns and other collectable and luxury cars is to repair problems as soon as possible after these problems develop. When you disregard certain non functioning items such as for example... Left rear window, w/s washers, horn or power seat etc.etc.you soon accumulate a long list of frustrating and expensive problems. When you E-mail us with a single problem at a time,it is much easier for you to deal with. Also remember that when you are up to date with your concerns and problems on your Lincolns,you and your car are always ready to go and ready to show.
Bill

December 1, 2008

Power window care

Because of the nature of power window mechanisms, store your Lincolns and others with the power windows dropped approx. 1/16" to unload the gears etc. This will help prevent vital plastic and rubber parts from deteriorating and failing due to being under stress in the full upstop position during periods of non use.
Bill

November 4, 2008

Vehicle Storage

When storing your Lincoln for any length of time we advise you to store it with a fresh oil and filter change. Storing with old oil allows the acid in the old oil to eat away at critical engine bearings etc.
Bill

October 20, 2008

Welcome to Bill's Corner

Bill's Corner will keep you updated on news and events, here at LincolnLand and around the world. It's also going to become Lincoln Central for tips and tricks on restoring and maintaining classic Lincoln automobiles.

Watch for regular postings from Bill Gray and other LincolnLand staff.

Soon we'll also allow your comments.

If there's something you'd like us to write about, email us with your questions, news, etc. We look forward to your participation.

And we hope you enjoy this addition to our site!

Regards,

Chris Dunn
LincolnLand, Inc.