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July 18, 2017

1979 Mark V Hard To Start

Hi Bill -

Thank you for getting back to me on the A/C issue with my Mark V. I will share with my mechanic..

I have a new issue... I previously had my mechanic work on the carb to get it to where it starts just like the owners manual advises where if it sits idle for a few days or more, then depress the accelerator pedal two or three times. After I got the car back all was perfect with the cold start where I would do like the owners manual advises and it would start up in like 3-4 seconds in which I would let the choke warm up and then drive away no problem. In the past few months, the cold start process is taking longer each time even if starting the car the very next day. It will just crank and crank and then start after now up to 6-10 seconds. It never did that before and seems like each time the cold start process is taking longer each time I go to start it. Keep in mind that this is happening here in Phoenix, with a brutal heat wave in which some days the air temp is 118 degrees, and the car is stored in a enclosed storage facility. I had the mechanic replace the power valve twice in the carb now and I am wondering if that is the issue again, or is it the brutal heat or vapor lock? I had the gas tank cleaned out, and added fresh gas with a fuel stabilizer that they said I should use since I don't drive the card that often. By the way, when I drive the car, no problem at all with acceleration or deacceleration - it's just this recent cold start issue taking longer, and keep in mind I sometimes go to the storage facility to start it say on a sat morning and the temp outside is about 85-90 degrees. I also had a new fuel filter put on it as well. I appreciate your help with this new issue.

Bill

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Hi Bill -

Agreed, it does sound like a fuel mixture or fuel availability problem. Have your mechanic check the carburetor for cold choke operation and the availability of fuel from the internal carb air inlet under the choke butterfly to the engine from the accelerator pump while pumping but not cranking when the engine has been sitting COLD. Fuel in abundance must be available immediately for an instant cold start.

Sincerely,

Bill

July 10, 2017

1979 Mark V AC Questions

Hi Bill -

I have a 1979 Lincoln Mark V with 10K original miles and have a A/C issue.. When I bought the car I found out from my mechanic that the A/C compressor has a leak and would need to be replaced..It had already been converted to R-134 before so I had the compressor replaced and filled with R-134 again..This was done in early spring and it seemed to work fine but what the climate control system does is when you start the car and turn on the A/C it works fine..When you put it in drive and drive slow it still works fine however when you get on the highway and get it up to speed like over 30MPH approx and above with the A/C temperature selector set as low as it will go the climate control system kicks in and slightly warm air starts coming in from the floor heater ducts and a little from the dash and then the A/C will come back on and start blowing cold again and then back to the heat mode..Keep in mind here in Arizona when I drive it is above 100 Degrees F outside. The A/C should be blowing colder for a longer time and the climate control system is kicking the A/C out sooner than it should..I was wondering if it could be the A/C temperature control sensor that is bad and is not recognizing the true inside cabin temp inside the car..What are your thoughts??

Thanks,

Bill

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Hello Bill -

The system on your Mark does not cycle the compressor so therefor it is engaged all of the time that the Climate Control is on. The compressor will be off in the Vent position, the Heat position and in the winter when the ambient temp. is under approximately 35 degrees F. Loss of vacuum anywhere in the control system will cause a drift towards blended heat and defrost. You should check the ATC vacuum system as per the factory service manual for a vacuum leak or a vacuum servo internal leak. A system that is undercharged with refrigerant can loose some cooling at higher speeds because of refrigerant shrinkage but will not cause a default to the floor ducts. Did you check to see if any air was blowing out of the defrost ducts when the symptoms appeared? The ATC temperature sensor above the glove box assembly. can also be faulty as you suggest but it also cannot cause a default to heat at the floor ducts. Another possibility is some vacuum lines crossed under the dash or under the hood. Vacuum can leak anywhere that the vacuum is routed including the a/c vacuum reservoir and its Vacuum check valve. Engine vacuum can drop at higher speeds and if there is also a vacuum leak somewhere in the system, the controls cannot and will not maintain maximum cooling. I think that you will find that air is also blowing out of the defrost ducts when this heating occurs. In any case the a/c vacuum system should be tested in a logical sequence ( do not omit any a/c lines or vacuum motors) using the proper vacuum pump with a built in vacuum gauge and shop manual with the vacuum diagrams in order to pinpoint any leaks. Show this reply to your a/c mechanic. He may be experienced and able to locate the problem quickly. Some vacuum leaks can sometimes be spotted easily under the hood. We wish you a speedy repair.

Sincerely,

Bill

July 6, 2017

1968 Continental Will Not Turn Off

Hi Bill,

I have a 1968 4 door Lincoln Continental with the 462 engine. When I turn the key off the engine will not shut off, unless I turn the radio on?? I have replaced the Alternator and Voltage Regulator, but the problem has not gone away. It is like the coil is getting a back feed through the circuit somewhere. Any help you can give would be appreciated.

Thank you, Regards,

Aaron

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Greetings Aaron -

Some of these types of issues can be time consuming to diagnose but accurate diagnosis is very important. You need to know a few things about your car before trying to uncover the actual problem.

Did the problem begin after some" recent" repair or addition to the vehicle?

Do you have a non factory ignition system (Petronix etc)?

You could start testing at the ignition coil with the key in the off position and with the engine off. If you have power at the coil in this position you would need to test why power is available there in this off position. A proper wiring diagram and 12v test light is a must for the testing. The power path will lead from the coil to the ignition switch and also to the starter solenoid. A short inside the starter solenoid could cause the coil to be powered up with the key off. Unplugging that wire at the starter solenoid will remove the power to the coil if the solenoid is faulty. The other possibility is that the ignition switch or its electrical connection is shorted. Unplugging the ignition switch and carefully inspecting the plug will remove power to the coil if there is a problem in that area. You can observe the power at the ignition coil with every disconnect that you do to find out if that component is shorted etc.

I have no idea what the radio could have to do with your problem unless some unknown wiring deviation was added to your Lincoln. Do you know if any non factory wiring was ever added to your vehicle?

Sincerely,

Bill

1979 Mark V Draw On System

Bill -

I have a 3.5 amp draw that I can't find.I have a battery disconnect switch that I turn off when I'm not running the car. If it gets left on it will run the battery down over night. What I've done so far. Removed each fuse one at a time and checked the draw each time I remove a fuse. With the neg. battery cable disconnected I check with my amp meter between the neg.cable end, and the neg. battery post. All fused wiring checked good. I removed the battery cable to the alternator same 3.5 amp draw problem. Any ideas what it could be? It has to be something that is on all the time or a short somewhere.Thanks for any help.

Lyle

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Hello Lyle -

It sounds like you have been busy with that draw. Disconnecting components one at a time is a good idea and should expose the culprit. Have you checked the trunk light, under hood light and the glove box light carefully to be sure that no lights remain on when the trunk, hood and glove box are closed? Do you have any alarms, radios or other aftermarket accessories added to the car? How old is your battery? A battery load test and charge test may be a good idea even though you disconnect it overnight.

To check the charging system for a draw, ALL of the wires must be disconnected at the alternator as well as the voltage regulator. Your email indicates that only one wire is disconnected at the alternator for your test.

Sincerely,

Bill

July 5, 2017

1976 Mark IV Radio Removal

Hi Bill :) hoping you can help my Dad and I in removing the radio on my Lincoln. We have removed the cover for the instrument panel and can not figure out how to remove the simulated wood plate that the knob posts come through. The FM does not work and we want to replace it with another stock unit. I don't have a shop manual for it, I know it's probably a simple step I can't figure out. Can u please help? :) Thank you so much!!!

Michael

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Hi Michael -

Very nice choice of Lincoln to have and drive. I have one also with 32000 miles on it. That woodgrain mask may not need to be removed to service the radio. The radio removal procedure begins on page 35-01-06 in the factory service manual. If you are going be keeping the car and doing your own repairs, the correct set of manuals is an absolute must in order to save time and money. We may be able to send you a copy of the radio removal procedure from our files. A copy of the complete manuals is available from Lincoln Land when you are ready. Good luck with your "new" Mark !

Sincerely,

Bill

1971 Mark III Aftermarket Shock Question

Hallo Bill-

I recently purchased a Mark III - 1971. Because of the mileage my mechanic suggested replacing the shock-absorbers, which was fine with me. He installed the most basic, standard (cheapest) Monroes. But I don't like them. They feel too "light", not suitable for a 4750 lbs car. The car feels "wobbly" (lack of a better word) and unstable / unsafe especially at (European) standard highway speed, eg 75-80 mph. One can not hold the steering wheel straight and still for more than a couple of seconds, it needs constant re-adjusting and correcting. Where I live (Belgium) it is difficult to find reliable and/or technical information let alone other Mk III owners to share information with, hence I address you with my question. What is a good (the best?) replacement for the shock absorbers? Monroe is the most common brand in Europe (+service) although all other brands can be found and ordered (KYB, Gabriel etc) Based on what I read, and what would be my choice with what I know so far, Monroe Load Adjusting shocks are a good choice. (the "Monroe" brand just for the sake and ease of its broad service network over here - other brands have identical types) The car is daily used and doesn't carry / tow loads. Just me and the occasional passenger. What is your recommendation, all help and advice is most appreciated. Kind regards.

Samuel - Leuven, Belgium

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Greetings Den -

Because of the many shocks available and the many needs and wants of the owners we do not get too involved with the selection of these types of parts. If you are not happy with the shock absorbers that your mechanic has chosen you will need to speak to him for a correction.

More important than shock absorbers at this point in time is your description of the steering and handling of your Mark III. A vehicle that exhibits the symptoms such as you describe clearly needs to be immediately inspected and corrected by a competent "front end" technician. Your vehicle may have some serious worn out parts. We can supply most steering and suspension parts if needed.

Sincerely,

Bill