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May 26, 2017

1963 Lincoln Continental Running On After Being Turned Off

Bill -

I just had my 1963 Lincoln convertible serviced. They changed the oil, complete brake job, changed two core plugs, and got the air conditioning system operating. We inherited this car and before taking it to get it serviced the engine did not make much noise. I just received the car back yesterday. I went on two drives and when I turned the car off, the engine started to rattle and make banging noises. What is the potential issue here? I have also been putting in 87 ethanol free gas, could that be an issue? I have been concerned putting in any gas mixed with ethanol as I am pretty sure the car has not been modernized to take any percentage of ethanol fuel, even fuel mixed with 10% ethanol. Any help and recommendations are appreciated.

Will

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Hi Will -

Your description sounds very strongly like the engine has too fast of an idle when at operating temperature and is Dieseling a.k.a. Running On instead of shutting off immediately when the key is turned off. Show your mechanic the problem. It may turn out to be a simple carburetor adjustment that he can handle in a very short time. This is a common occurrence with all high compression engines. That engine should be using Premium high octane fuel.

Sincerely,

Bill

May 25, 2017

1969 Mark III Leaking Oil, Follow Up and Reply....

Hello Bill,

My name is Gianni and I have a concern regarding my timing cover on my 460. I have the crank driven pump which I recently rebuilt and works great, and had replaced my timing cover with another because of some damage my original had. I took all precautionary steps to get a good seal on the cover, and cover to pump seal, but I have a rather large leak coming from this area. It looks to be coming from the back of the power steering pump and is definitely engine oil. I can still drive around, but have to check the level frequently. Do you know what could be wrong, the pump doesn't leak, but the seal behind it seems to be faulty?

Thanks

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Greetings Gianni -

Several possibilities for your engine oil leak come to mind after reading your email. These are.... the crankshaft oil slinger was omitted during installation of the front cover. This could allow engine oil to scour the front seal with excess oil splash that the seal was never designed to handle. Next is the possibility of .......An incorrect or damaged front cover (at the seal area) was installed. This would cause a poor sealing situation. Another possibility is that the special seal between the front cover and the p/s pump was damaged, not installed at all or the original was not replaced with a new one and was already severely aged and ineffective after the removal and replacement procedure. What are the possibilities for any of the above suggestions?

Sincerely,

Bill

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Bill -

It's hard to say? I installed a new rubber seal to the cover and made sure everything was prepped cleanly. Are 1969 covers different from those that have the 1968 year stamped on them? They looked exactly the same.

Gianni

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It's hard for you to say?? It's even harder for me to say.....from here. The front covers for 460s with crank mounted p/s pumps should all be the same. Did we supply this cover or any other parts? The facts are that if every thing was prepped cleanly and assembled correctly and you have an oil leak at that area as you described, the pump will need to be removed again and that area inspected. Are you sure that the leak is not somehow coming from higher up from the rear of the pump? What about the possibility of the oil slinger omission that was suggested to you in my first reply?

Bill

May 23, 2017

1979 Continental Sedan Battery Drain

Bill -

I have a 1979 Lincoln Continental Sedan and this last year it seems to be draining its battery while it is sitting. I put a meter on the battery and it reads 12.7 as soon as I turn off the car. While it is running it is 13.8. I know newer cars the alternator produces 14.3, but not 100% sure on this one. It seems to take about an hour to drain it down to 12.2 where at this point the starter will only click, which I expect. If I boost it at this point, it fires right back up. I should notice observations at this point. A new behaviour is; I can wind down the windows and use the radio with the key off as well as pop the trunk & run the heater blower. My guesses at this point are: a relay somewhere or the alternator regulator is bad. I can continue to drive the car and I just uncouple the negative when I stop for any period of time. Any thoughts or advise would be appreciated as I'm grasping at directions to search.

Tom

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Hi Tom -

If your readings are correct, 12.2 volts at the posts of a good battery is more than enough to crank and start that engine. After turning off the engine it is not abnormal for the voltage to drop somewhat from 12.7. I suspect that the battery is aged or faulty and therefore a load test at an automotive electrical shop would be necessary to verify the battery condition. If you suspect the alternator or a regulator, they alone could be disconnected during a period of non use to prove or disprove an internal electrical draw. Of course, all other cable connections must be correct and in good order.

After the above electrical draw is corrected and the newer accessory power problem that you have described still exists you will need to trace that circuit with the use of the proper manual and wiring diagrams. This type of diagnosis is best done in a logical sequence by a technician with this type of electrical experience.

Sincerely,

Bill

May 16, 2017

1967 Continental Coupe Running Issues & Update

Hi Bill,

I drive my Lincoln around for about 10 minutes with no problems, then eventually the accelerator starts to give up and when I press the accelerator it makes a whining sound. When its on idle it doesn't make the whining sound, only when I accelerate. I have to pull over and let it rest for 10 minutes in order to drive it again for 10 minutes and encounter the same problem. Any ideas on what can cause this? I have an electric ignition source too wondering if that's the reason... please help.

Alex

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Greetings Alex -

The description of your issue really provides me with very little information to even guess what your problem could be. The fact that you also offer no information on what has been already checked or inspected by yourself or your mechanic also adds to my problem in diagnosing.

What does " eventually the accelerator starts to give up" mean?

Whining and squealing suggests something as easy as a loose drive belt or a noisy electric fuel pump (if you have had one installed). If the engine simply stops running after 10 minutes you could be experiencing a plugging fuel filter, a failing fuel pump, old fuel from a contaminated fuel tank etc etc. For all that I know your Lincoln may have been sitting unused and untuned for many years.

Can you supply us with more and helpful information that may lead to some better suggestions for you.

We probably can't help with your after market electronic ignition without having the vehicle here to do our own testing.

Sincerely,

Bill

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Yeah sorry,

Ok so I start my 1967 Lincoln Continental Coupe and it starts up fine. As I get 10 minutes or so into driving normally, when I step on the accelerator it hesitates and very little power is given into the throttle. Also at the same time is makes this weird whining noise only when I press the accelerator. It can idle fine no problem no noise.

If I park it for 10 minute and let it rest then fire it back up it runs and drives fine again for 10 minute or so.

When I step on the accelerator it seems like it rubs on something and makes this whining noise and also shakes sometimes. This all happens after 10 minutes of driving. Before that it drives smooth and accelerator works fine.

I did have the power steering pump and transmission box repaired because of a leak.

How do you think I should start to diagnose this problem.

Thanks -

Alex

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Alex -

I would start by having your mechanic open the hood and inspect the complete accelerator linkage for some sort of interference. You should be aware that some of the linkage on this model is located under the floor at the accelerator pedal. It has a flexible bellows attached to prevent moisture intrusion. The linkage and structure at this location is known to corrode, seize and subsequently cause problems.
Then the accessory engine drive belts should be checked for condition and looseness. This type of problem may require some on scene diagnosis by only an experienced technician in order to pinpoint the issue quickly and correctly. For the next step, the engine should be running and the whining noise should be in the audible stage for you to try to locate the cause during the diagnosis. Your issue could even prove to be a carburetor problem. The above suggestions and my previous reply are the best that I can supply at this point based on the information that you have provided. I also assume that your engine and related engine parts are stock and in good order. Be sure to use extra caution and safety measures around a running engine. Let us know if anything is found during the inspections.

Sincerely,

Bill