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February 28, 2017

THE TOP SIX - VACUUM OPERATED HEADLAMP COVER PROBLEMS

1. System Check Valve (internal leak)
2. Servo Motor(s) (leak)
3. Headlight Switch (leak)
4. Vacuum Hoses and Tubes (leaks)
5. Vehicles equipped with Auto Lamp option - Solenoid Valve (internal vacuum leak)
6. Previous Owner or Mechanic has unknowingly disabled the System.


NOTE: A correct Vacuum Diagram and a Hand Held Vacuum Pump are strongly advised for diagnosis.

February 16, 2017

1969 Mark III Headlight Door Issues

Bill -

Good Morning and thank you for this site. I have been troubleshooting the vacuum system for a headlight door problem. I can hear vacuum hissing when the headlight switch is in the ON position. Is this designed to dump vacuum when the car is running in order to keep the lights open?

Greg

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Greetings Greg -

Several threads have been posted previously on this blog that are related to this subject. They can be located and read also. The short answer to your question is yes, there will be a short vacuum sound when the headlamp covers are repositioning to the open or closed mode. However, the system is not designed to constantly "dump" vacuum.

In a proper operating vacuum headlamp system on your Mark III, vacuum flow should be heard for a few seconds only when the Headlight switch is moved to the H/lamps On or Off position. When the switch is moved to either position (with the vacuum system charged and maintaining engine vacuum) vacuum is reversed to the opposite side of the dual port Headlamp Vacuum Servos located at the the H/L doors. During this vacuum reversal and subsequent repositioning of the headlamp doors a vacuum sound will be detected from the vacuum portion of the switch for only approximately 3-5 seconds as the vacuum is reversing . If you are still hearing a vacuum "leaking" sound from this system after the doors are repositioned, a leak must exist somewhere in the vacuum system. If this is so, the leak will continue when he engine is turned Off and the h/l doors will open in a short time period until the engine is started again.

To diagnose and locate a leak, a good vacuum diagram and some knowledge of how the system operates will be a great help to you. Remember though that the h/l switch can be cracked and leaking BUT with only a leaking sound at the switch does not prove for sure that the switch is faulty. With a large leak elsewhere, the sound that you are hearing could possibly be the vacuum rushing through the switch towards the large leak. If a leak is strongly suspected at the switch, it should be removed and the vacuum portion bench tested. The above are only possibilities that we have encountered in the past. The system consists of many connections and hoses that can cause leaks. Many times we find multiple leaks in some vehicles. Accurate diagnosis and patience is required to pinpoint the culprit. At Lincoln Land we stock many parts to repair these systems.

Sincerely,

Bill

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Bill -

Thank you. I did find a cracked hose going to the firewall. One of the vacuum cans has a "built in" check valve. Do you know the best way to test that? I have been from the bumper to firewall, checked vac motors for leaks, lines for leaks, check valves for operation, cans for leaks, and I am now inside the dash looking at the vac motors on the climate control system. My climate system is not follwing the troubleshooting flow chart (in the black repair manual) by changing air flow through the dash outlets when it should. I think I can hear hissing in that area, but my years of race cars and loud music is hurting the diagnosis. Your information is very helpful and I thank you! This year I am determined to find the problem.

Greg

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Greg -

The vacuum check valves which are located in the rubber hose lines or integral with a reservoir are a simple device. They allow engine vacuum to flow into the vacuum system that they serve but when a period of low engine vacuum occurs or the engine is shut off, the vacuum is sealed in the system at the valve so that it is not lost back to the engine. When vacuum resumes at the check valve from the engine, the vacuum will now flow again as necessary through the valve as designed.

We like to use a hand held vacuum pump to diagnose and verify the integrity and operation of any suspect components such as the check valves. Good luck with your diagnosis and repair.

Sincerely,

Bill

February 7, 2017

1963 Continental Starting Issues

Hey Bill!

Thank you for helping all us Lincoln lovers! I'm having issues starting my 63 Continental and was wondering if you had any advice? The car will not crank, fan doesn't move etc. When I turn the key it just makes a nasty sound like someone that doesn't know how to use a clutch. I've replaced the starter, starter cable, and starter solenoid, plus tested the battery (12.6volts). The car still makes the same sound. When I first tried starting it the fan would turn a little then stop and the nasty sound would start. I tried the hammer to the starter trick but that just made it worse. I'm thinking that the starter is not engaging with the flywheel. When I installed the new starter it went in perfectly and I used all the same bolts, washers, etc. Before installing the starter I looked at the flywheel (portion that I could see) and didn't notice any broken teeth etc. The old starter didn't have any damaged teeth either. I just got my car back from my mechanic a few weeks ago and drove it around the block once before parking it in the garage. I haven't been able to start it since! My mechanic specializes in 60's continentals. He just replaced the brake booster, oil pan gasket, rear diff gasket, and motor mounts. He recommended I get my rear main gasket replaced sometime when I can afford it. I don't believe they would've separated the tranny from motor. Any thoughts on getting my car back on the road?

Thank you again,

Matt

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Greetings Matt -

If your starter electrical circuit including the cables and battery ( there are other battery tests besides voltage) are in good order as you describe I would begin by removing the starter and inspecting the flywheel very carefully. This would involve rotating the crankshaft manually as the flywheel is thoroughly examined for cracks, warping, looseness and damaged teeth. Your Lincoln mechanic will understand what I am suggesting. If all of the above is in good order the starter motor should be tested by the re builder for proper operation in all respects.

Sincerely,

Bill

February 3, 2017

1976 Mark IV Blower Only Working On Maximum Setting

Bill-

I have a 76 Mark IV Lipstick Edition with 15k actual miles. I have worked on Lincolns for the last 25 years, and enjoy the challenge. The blower will only work on maximum. All vents work, defog, vacuum open and close as they should. I ordered a blower relay from Lincoln Land, fitted it just the same. The terminals are like new and clean. Like most low miles cars, I do not know weather to use it more and see if it springs back into life, or investigate more. The car is like new all original everywhere you look. Your thoughts would be appreciated.

Kind regards,

Dave in the United Kingdom

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Hi Dave -

Some of these electrical problems can be challenging at times. The function of the blower relay is to connect the blower motor directly to the battery through a fuse link only when Max Blower is selected. When you select a Lower speed the relay is de-energized and another connection is made between two wires within the relay for all other speeds. These two wires can be temporarily jumped together ( with the relay disconnected ) as a test for proper continuity inside the relay. The wire colors to jump should be, The large gauge Orange with a Black tracer and Light Green with a White tracer. Unplug the relay and jump these two wires together temporarily as a test. Turn the key to the on position with the blower switch on a lower speed. If the blower motor now begins to operate with these two wires jumped but is non operative when the plug is again attached to the relay, you could have faulty relays. If the blower still does not start you will need to trace the blower circuit as per the wiring diagram. In either event please contact us so that we can correct a possible faulty relay for you or help you proceed to the next diagnostic step. Do you have a proper wiring diagram for the HVAC system for your Mark IV ?

Sincerely,

Bill

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Bill -

Unplugged the replacement relay, crossed the two wires, black and orange. Green white, turned ignition on, nothing, not a flicker. Still no low or high.

Regards,

Dave

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Hi Dave -

It sounds like you have jumped the correct wires The first wire actually should be orange with a black stripe though. On the Lower speed setting the green wire with a white stripe should have power from the system unless the engine is cold and the ATC is calling for heat. Check for power at that wire with a warm engine and the control set on the lower speed. If there is power at that green/white wire try the jump test again. There should be two 20 amp fuses in the fuse box for the climate control that can be checked with a 12 v test light. If still no power at the green / white wire (with a warm engine running and the control set on a lower speed range), a wiring diagram will be necessary for you to trace the power path properly. As an added test, the relays can easily be bench tested with the use of "continuity tester" applied to the two pins on the relay that the above two previously jumped wires attach to on the relay. Do you have a correct wiring diagram to aid you in further testing?
Sincerely,

Bill

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Bill -

Problem sorted. Bad connection at the back of blower switch. Pushed it well home ,and working great on all settings. Thanks for your help and assistance.

Regards,

Dave

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Hi Dave -

We are happy that you have found and corrected your problem. Your next step would have been to trace the power path on the green/white wire from the high blower relay plug using the wiring diagram. The loose connection at the switch would have been found during the diagnosis. Good work and perseverance on your part proved to be successful in correcting this issue. We were glad to assist.

Sincerely,

Bill