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October 18, 2016

1973 Continental Starter Removal Issues

Hi Bill,

I am replacing the starter on my 73 Continental. I can get the existing starter disconnected but when it comes to actually removing from the car the steering linkage is in the way. I saw in an earlier response you suggested disconnecting the idler from the frame. I also read in an old Mitchell manual I have that I may need to turn the wheels to the right and disconnect the idler. The only problem is I still don't think I have enough room to wiggle it out and away from the car. I also thought about trying to take off the solenoid to gain more wiggle room but I don't know if that's a good idea. Any suggestions? Please feel free to email me directly, thanks!

Tom

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Hello Tom -

The removal of the starter is shown on page 28-03-04 of the 1973 Factory Shop Manual for that style of starter on the 460 cid engine. It describes turning the steering linkage for a right turn and disconnecting the idler arm from the vehicle frame in order to maneuver the starter out on the Mark IV. There may also be a brace in the way and blocking removal that will need to be disconnected at one end as well. The full size Lincoln model may not require this procedure at all. If you have some aftermarket type of exhaust pipe or any other non factory parts etc. interfering, you will need to disconnect these parts. Another thought to possibly consider is that a badly deteriorated motor mount could be lowering the engine and causing some interference. Removing the solenoid from the starter prior to removing the assembly is not advised.

Sincerely,

Bill

October 14, 2016

1977 Town Car Headlight Door Issues

Bill,

Saw your response to another post about similar problem they had with a Mark V. The 77 Town Car I have is in Hawaii and no local mechanic seems to be able or want to find that vacuum leak. What's happened so far is when I got the car a few years ago, the leak was such that doors stayed shut for about 3 days before starting to gradually open. Both would open at the same time and at the same rate. The problem got gradually worse. Upon investigating this, somebody suggested trying to change check valve near fire wall. Did this. No change. Also changed headlight switch as that too was suggested as possible culprit. So car had to go into shop for over a year to get engine changed. When I got car back, doors were worse. Driver side door slow to open and close even when engine on. Passenger side opens and closes quickly like before. But now will fully open if car left parked for even a few minutes. I got a shop to look at it and even got them the large ford pamphlet/ book on the vacuum / electrical system. Unfortunately they are not patient to try to really get to the root of the problem. They just want me to obtain two new door actuators which are hard to find. Oh in addition I disconnected air line to driver side actuator to check hose connection and a significant amount of water came out. So probably the driver side actuator is bad, but not positive on passenger side one. Do you agree actuators are likely cause or how water could get inside driver's side actuator? Can you suggest parts to tell them to check and if you have these parts you could sell or direct me to where I could find them?

Thanks,

Robert

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Hello Robert -

Several blog replies have been posted here regarding vacuum leaks and they all have similar information. Vacuum leaks can be located anywhere that the vacuum is routed and the total amount of loss will be the sum of all of the leaks that are found. We only recommend performing proper diagnosis to repair these systems. Without diagnosing you can consider every component that is shown in your shop manual a suspect. The vacuum motors (actuators) can very easily be tested for leaks and determined absolutely without doubt if they are leaking or not but unfortunately you have described the technicians that work on your car as impatient which is incompetence in my opinion. To sum up, I can sit here and type out ALL of the other parts that you have not "tried out" as culprits but that would be only guessing and a disservice to you.

We usually do stock most of the parts needed to repair these vacuum systems. Some components can also be successfully repaired in our shop.

The one possible way that water can be inside the lines etc. is that a sizable vacuum leak or leaks has the outside air entering the components and is condensing on the walls of the interior where the vacuum is routed. This of course is only a theory.

Although the headlamp door actuators are very popular leak areas I do hope that someone will diagnose and qualify them as faulty before you order replacement parts. As our customer we can offer to properly test any parts for you that are sent to us if you are unable to receive that service where you are located. Please check with George before sending us any parts for inspection.

Sincerely,

Bill

October 12, 2016

1963 Continental Acceleration Problems

Hi Bill,

I have a 1963 Lincoln Continental and having some acceleration problems. All started when my mechanical fuel pump died and installed an electric Carter pump, still no good. Then my mechanic thought my original carb was the problem (old and tired), so I installed an Edelbrock 750 with electric choke. Still ran the same, very sluggish and a hesitation during acceleration and an occasional backfire under load. Then thought it might ignition, so removed the points to a Crane points conversion kit. Then finally installed a MSD pro billet with vacuum advance. In the meantime I upgraded the battery cables, spark plug leads, coil and starter motor cable. The car is still doing it.

What can I look at next as I am running out of patience. Your help will be grateful.

Regards,

Angelo

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Hi Angelo -

I am not sure of the performance and/or quality of the aftermarket parts that you have installed but if you and your mechanic are confident that the fuel and ignition are more than sufficient, please have your mechanic carefully read the enclosed blog question and reply from the Lincoln Land Blog of January 2013. Does this information sound like your issue? Let us know the results.
Sincerely,

Bill

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January 21, 2013

1965 Continental Is Sluggish

Hi Bill,

I have been working on a customers 65 Continental for a couple of months now. He brought it to me saying it shut off on him one day and when he started it back up it was running rough and had little power. I have have been through this thing in and out, top and bottom. Did all the usual diagnosis stuff and have changed parts as I have found defects. The car was running rough at idle and would break up real bad when trying to accelerate, popping back back through the carburetor and smelling very rich. The first thing I did was rebuild the distributor, it wasn't advancing and the plate was very corroded. That didn't help at all. I pulled the timing cover to check the chain and marks and that was fine so I pulled the intake and discovered the lifters were seizing in the bores. I cleaned the bores, installed a new camshaft, lifters and timing chain set. While I had it that far down I sent the heads to the machine shop and 500 bucks later they were fixed with a few valves and all new springs. All the rockers are free and pushrods not bent. After all that the car idles as smooth as a brand new car, but still have no power and can barely accelerate. New coil, 12 volts to the coil, new cap and rotor, timing set at 10 degrees ( have tried it from 6 to 16 degrees), 5-6psi fuel pressure at the carb, new helper fuel pump near the tank, compression is 130-140 on every cylinder after warm-up. After all this the car still has very little power, breaks up during acceleration and is still slightly popping through the carburetor at WOT. You can see a mist of fuel with a flashlight coming out of the top of the carb while power breaking it at half throttle. I've hit a brick wall with this one, its the first 430 Ive ever worked on, I'm too far in it to stop now. Any ideas or advice? Thanks so much.

Andy

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Greetings Andy -

After reviewing your letter several times and reading what you have done so far with this engine and assuming that all of your work has been done correctly as per the engine's specifications etc. I can offer the following. The factory exhaust systems on these engines use a " double wall" exhaust pipe. These of course are the pipes that bolt up to the exhaust manifolds and continue on to the next flange connection rearward. It is not unheard of for the inner pipe to develop a separation in such a way as to severely seal up the exhaust on one side enough to cause the symptoms that you are describing. When this occurs the outer wall remains intact and no exhaust leak is heard. Because of the exhaust heat factor this final "plug up" can take place in a very short period of time as your customer has described to you. If the vehicle has the original style pipes on it you should remove them for a careful internal inspection.

Two other items to be aware of when tuning or servicing this era of engine are...The damper pulley on the crankshaft can separate from the rubber damper material and give you an incorrect timing reading. These are available rebuilt. The second is that the vacuum advance units on the distributor are well known to seize or rupture and become inoperative. These are available new.

I hope that the above helps you and I would ask you to let us know here at Lincoln Land what you find.

Sincerely,

Bill

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January 30, 2013

1965 Continental Is Sluggish - Update

Bill I can't thank you enough for the advice, I unbolted the exhaust just before the muffler's and sure enough the passenger side exhaust pipe was clogged shut. I ran 2 new pipes from the manifolds to the mufflers and the car runs perfect!! I've run into double walled exhaust pipe problems before but 99% of those cases were on Honda's. I had no idea these Lincolns were manufactured with it and probably never would have checked it.

Thanks again,

Andy.


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Hi Bill,

Thank you for your advice, being way over here in Australia it is a bit hard to find anyone with any experience at all with these cars. They have their querks and I guess that's part of the reason we love them! I think your blog from Jan 2013 is quite interesting in relation to my car. I had the exhaust built new but(there's always a but) the exhaust guy couldn't undo the bolts on the end of the headers and was worried about snapping them of if he applied too much force, so he left about 3 foot of original pipe and then welded a flange and continued with new pipe. So my problem could may aswell lie there.

Can I also ask, he recommended only using two mufflers before the diff so that they would run hotter and wont collect any water in them due to the fact that as we don't use these cars all too often enough, and thus avoid any rusting away in the muffler.

I forgot to mention last time that the car ran beautiful at idle and cruising at slow speeds runs great, and on the open freeway at about 60 mile/hr runs even better(there's not enough road ha ha) its just that acceleration problem I cant handle. I tell you that I wont rest til I fix that gremlin in there. Cheers again Bill.

Regards,

Angelo

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Angelo -

Everyone has their own opinion and there is plenty to read on the internet regarding exhaust systems. I personally only go with all of the original components on my systems because I enjoy the "Lincoln Quietness" of the factory installations. The available quality (and of course more costly) stainless steel components that are available do not rust out. Be advised however that the cheaper stainless exhaust parts are usually NOT of the optimum quality in all respects. In the end it is up to you according to your wants, needs and affordability. We wish you luck in diagnosing your recent engine issues.

Sincerely,

Bill

October 4, 2016

1970 Continental Starting Issues

Bill -

My 1970 Lincoln Town Car ("Ivy") with 58K miles has problems starting. My mechanic put in a new battery and rebuilt the starter. The car starts well, but when you shut it off after it's been running for 5-10 min, it doesn't always start again; it cranks and cranks. It needs to sit for about 10 min, and then it will start. The mechanic said it needs to cool down, but he can't pinpoint what's causing this malfunction. Any advice?

Thanks,

Tom

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Hi Tom -

After reading your problem description without knowing any tune up maintenance history on your 1970 Lincoln there are a few items that come to mind. The basic tune up components must be in good shape and properly adjusted exactly as required per the shop manual by a technician who is very familiar with this era of ignition systems. These tune up components are of course the engine ignition timing, ignition points and condenser, distributor cap and rotor, high tension wiring and spark plugs etc. After running a cold engine for ten minutes the carburetor choke MUST be moving to the wide open position as the engine warms up and the carburetor should not be flooding the intake manifold with any fuel after engine shut down. A hot flooded engine will most certainly not start easily until that excess fuel is allowed to evaporate somewhat. An engine that has been fuel flooding could also have blackened spark plugs causing a further poor spark condition. If the carburetor is NOT flooding the intake manifold after turning the engine off and you have no record of the tune up history as mentioned above I would have a tune up performed asap to assure that the engine is receiving a strong spark at the spark plugs. No engine that is in good tune "needs to cool down" in order to re start unless it has a serious cooling system failure and has been operated while overheated. Show the above to your mechanic and let us know the outcome. If all of the above is in good order and you still have starting issues let us know and we will proceed further.

Sincerely,

Bill