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July 27, 2016

1966 Continental Brake Light Issues

Hi Bill,

Have a problem with power leaving the brake light switch but not getting to the the brake light relay. If I power the output of the relay, I have brake lights. The car has a tilt wheel and the shop manual doesn't show the schematics. My question is the turn signal switch at the bottom of the steering column the only thing between the brake light switch and the brake light relay?

Thank you,

Joe

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Greetings Joe -

To answer your question it appears that on a 66 Lincoln the power from the brake light switch goes directly to the brake light relay. The complete circuit is also complicated on a 66 so I believe that a wiring diagram would be very helpful for you. We will ask George at our office to scare up a copy of the brake and turn signal diagram and send it to your email address.

Sincerely,

Bill

July 26, 2016

1966 Continental Vacuum Question

Bill -

I just replaced the vacuum line to the wiper motor and have been unable to find in any manual what function it performs. I can see it comes from the control and goes through a adjustable (?) fitting and then to the motor. Thank you.

Wayne

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Hello Wayne -

When the windshield washer is activated, vacuum is momentarily sent to the wiper motor to automatically activate the wipers for approximately eight swipes. When the vacuum in the line bleeds off (at the adjustable fitting that you mention) the wipers should shut off and park. That fitting is adjustable for the count of swipes. Check it out for the above operation. This operation is also explained briefly in the owners manual.

Sincerely,

Bill

1969 Mark III Vacuum Questions

Hi Bill,

Thanks to you and your team at Lincoln Land we have been enjoying our 1971 Mark III. One issue though is a hesitation at about 1/4 throttle. When accelerating normally the engine looses power at about 1/4 throttle - no rough running or missing or coughing - just no power. When you give it more throttle it wakes up and supplies great power. This condition is consistent. I have not been able to find a vacuum diagram that shows where the vacuum advance connects but I have it connected directly to the carb base port - drivers side of the carb. This is where my carb rebuilder said it should connect. I've seen other Mark III's that have the vac advance connected to the fitting at the thermostat housing. (I don't know how this fitting should be connected to vacuum as currently nothing is connected to it. ) I may be incorrect but Im thinking the vac advance function is the causing the hesitation. The vac advance appears to function properly but I'm not sure that its connect to vacuum properly. Any ideas. I have all the manuals and vacuum diagrams but cannot find the vacuum circuit for the advance at the distributor. Thanks!

John

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Hello John -

Not knowing the tune up history of your Mark regarding ignition and carburetor I need to say that the points, condenser, distr. and rotor must be in good shape as well as all of their respective adjustments etc.

The 1969 manual has a better diagram of the vacuum valve hose routing and I will have George send you a copy of that page. Not only should it be connected but it must be functioning as well. It can be tested with a hand held vacuum pump or other vacuum source. Newer style vacuum advance replacements are easily adjusted externally with an Allen key through the vacuum port as per the chart that is supplied with the replacement. This adjustment is very important! The initial ignition timing adjustment is also important to avoid a hesitation on acceleration. Problems arise with correct timing adjustment on these engines if the damper rotates on its rubber and shifts the timing mark. At this point the correct timing cannot be attained with a timing light. A new or rebuilt damper will be necessary or the timing will need to be set by ear and a road test. The road test is to advance the timing in steps slowly until good power is noticed to the point of some pinging on acceleration and then retarding the timing until the pinging is only very slight on heavy acceleration.

If all of the above is in good order, the fuel quality and a possible internal carburetor problem may need to be considered. Did this issue surface after a tune up or the carburetor rebuild or?

Sincerely,

Bill

July 25, 2016

1965 Continental Charging Issues

Hi Bill,

I have a 65 Continental that I have had for a while and it has been having charging issues since I got it. I've replaced the alternator and tensed the belt to ensure if it was tight so that it won't slip. Still, no charging. I made sure the connections were tight and everything looks fine. I have the shop manual for the car but I can't seem to trouble shoot the problem. I really love this car but I hate to have charging issues on such a beautiful car. I would appreciate if you can help me resolve this problem. Thanks Bill!

Josh

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Hello Josh -

Not knowing the history of any electrical repairs on your Lincoln by a previous owner I can only give you some facts along with some items to check. The 64 and 65 Lincolns are well known to develop poor connections at the amp gauge in the dash. This can sometimes result in a burnt connection with no charging and even severe electrical damage. Some owners have then repaired the gauge to operate correctly and some have merely spliced the two wires together to allow the charging system to operate without the amp gauge showing a charge. If a bad connection did develop sometime ago at your amp gauge the wires COULD be spliced and the battery is charging or disconnected completely resulting in no charging to the battery. IF it was spliced the charging rate should be tested at the battery only as the dash gauge will not indicate a charge or a discharge. If the gauge shows no movement you will need to inspect the amp gauge connection behind the dash for a bad connection or a previous repair. Another possibility is that the alternator Regulator could be faulty. These vehicles use a separate regulator that can fail. All wiring related to the charging system should also be inspected for previous inept tampering etc. If you have the correct Factory Shop Manual, all of the above will be shown and explained with test procedures. Many automotive supply shops such as Auto Zone and Advance will offer to test your charging system at no charge.

Sincerely,

Bill

1969 Mark III AC Questions

Hi Bill,

I wanted to wait a while before getting back to you to make sure the HVAC system was working properly. Sorry for the length of this email.

I took your advice and had the high-range relay re-built at Lincoln Land and it restored proper function of the blower motor and it now works on each of the four settings! I'm very happy! I do have a couple of concerns related to the operation of the system though at this point.

The AC does work, but I'm not sure it's as cold as it should be. When I first charged the system, I was getting cold air out of the registers at approximately 38 degrees F. Now, I'm luck to get air between 42 and 45, and only while driving steady for a long stretch. When I slow down or come to a red light, the air temperature at the registers jumps to about 60 degrees. I should mention that I have used R-12 and used the proper amount of refrigerant. If memory serves, 36 ounces?

Now, I understand the basic concept of the AC system and how it works so I know that on LOW, it draws outside air and that the air in the engine compartment is very hot and I'm sure that has a great effect on the output temperature. But on HIGH, isn't the air intake closed to outside air and recirculates interior air? I would imagine that on this setting, the air coming out of the vents should be "ice" cold as the evaporator is further cooling already "cool" air. Or is it simply that the compressor is that inefficient that it only works very well at higher engine speeds? I know I can't compare it to a new vehicle's system, but I would at least expect output temperatures cooler than 60 degrees at an idle.

I can only speculate that the main function of the ATC box is to maintain a comfortable air temperature inside the cabin and that maybe the box adjusts the temperature blend door and what I'm getting is a mix of hot (heater core) and cool air. I know there is an adjustment on the bottom of the box but does this make the blend door favor more cold or hot air (respectively), or does it simply keep the blower motor at a higher speed for a longer period of time to essentially provide cool air longer before it reduces speed?

Lastly, with the system set to DEFOG, I am getting air out of the floor, right defroster nozzle and only a SLIGHT amount of air from the left nozzle. However on DEICE, I get equal air from both dash nozzles. Is this proper function and if not, what would cause this?

Thanks for your continued help. Your advice and knowledge is second to none!

Sincerely,

Dan

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Hi Dan

From the many questions it sounds like you have some shop manual reading along with much diagnosing to do. The refrigeration section and the control section of the Climate control each have many areas that must be in good working order to cool a vehicle properly.

If the refrigeration section has in fact deteriorated since you charged it with the r12 it can be due to several factors. Along with increased ambient temperatures some of them are:

* The r12 could be leaking and slowly lowering the cooling capacity.

* The cooling fan clutch may be defective and not engaging properly to pull plenty of air through the condenser at low speeds. Possible incorrect fan blade.

* The expansion valve could be faulty.


On the control portion the issues could be:

* The water valve may not be closing when required due to no vacuum at the valve when needed or it could be operating properly on the outside but not sealing on the inside ( must be removed for visual inspection on the inside and bench tested to be sure ).

* Rear vent at rear window package tray or left cowl floor vent may not be closing.

* Control head could be defective.

Any missing ductwork or blower air leakage at any ducting outside under the hood at the firewall or inside under the dash will result in less air being delivered to the inside passenger area. The left a/c outlet is well known to disconnect on many Marks of this era. On High the air supply will be on Recirc. for most of the maximum cooling if the ATC box and the control head are functioning. Do not adjust the control at the ATC box as it is only for minor adjustments for customer preference. Adjustments here will not cure the real issue or increase the maximum cooling performance unless it was already turned far away from its center position. For your deice/defog problem you need to inspect that vacuum motor under the dash for vacuum at the two ports that are on this motor. For deice no vacuum should be present. The vacuum motors can also be tested with a hand held vacuum pump. The shop manual has a very helpful chart that shows the vacuum as directed from the ATC box to the vacuum motors for the various functions. For all we know vacuum lines under the dash could be crossed along with some unknown repairs by previous owners or mechanics without using the proper Shop Manual. We have seen many cars in for repair with misarranged a/c and heater parts. The above advice is based on a portion of the past problems that we have found here at Lincoln Land. When you have done some inspection on some of the above items let us know what is found. We can provide further advice depending on what is uncovered if necessary. We wish you the best of luck with the HVAC diagnosis and a speedy repair.

Sincerely,

Bill

July 22, 2016

1989 Town Car Autolamp Issues

Bill -

The auto dimming will not let me use upper beam. When I use the stalk to turn on high beams, they drop to low beams as soon as I release. I checked the owners manual, and with the dimmer control set at mid point, I pulled the stalk up halfway and the upper beam indicator light on the dash and also hi beams. This was done in a dark area with the photo cell covered. Any suggestions? This car is not my daily driver. I take it to cruise gatherings and want every thing to work. Thank you.

George

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Hi George -

The Autolamp option is a nice feature to have operating on your Lincoln. We do not see many customers that are in for service of the Automatic Headlamp Dimmer portion. When we do service this feature we have the luxury of a parts inventory for testing purposes that we have removed from vehicles that are being recycled. We also refer to the Factory Service manual as it has a detailed troubleshooting chart to aid in pinpointing most component problems. The owners manual that you refer to in your email would be limited in this area. Although the sensor/amplifier, relay and the dimmer switch are common fail items, proper diagnosis is necessary to avoid buying and replacing good parts.

If you wish to diagnose the system as per the proper manual, George R. Miller at our office should be able to arrange a copy of that section of the 1989 Lincoln Town Car manual or a complete set of Factory Service Manuals for future issues on your Lincoln be sent be sent to your address. When you have diagnosed the problem and need any parts, we should be able to supply them to you.

Sincerely,

Bill

July 15, 2016

1969 Mark III Starting Issues

Hello Bill,

Having just purchased (Two Days Ago) a 1969 Mark III (first Model Version), and my first ever Lincoln!, I came across your website while doing some searches for parts & issues. This website seems like a great resource for information and Parts. Unfortunately, I am in not anywhere near your shop...otherwise I would just bring it in (I am in Santa Fe, New Mexico...if you know of any Mark III Mechanics)...but back to my query...the car has 46,000 miles on it, runs great. The odd thing is 1. to start the car I have to lift the Gear Selector above Park in order to engage the starter (won't do anything if I try to start without doing this)...the person I bought the car from said this is what he was told to do as well. 2. When I engage the starter by using the aforementioned method the starter will only crank one short burst...then stop. (it will not keep cranking). When the engine is cold it starts right up...using this method. When I have been driving and then stop and try to re-s tart, 90 % of the time I have to engage the starter 4-5 times before the car starts, each time in one short burst (and lifting the gear selector above park). Is this normal? Does not seem like it)....if not what parts might I need to repair this issue. Thanks Much. Your website is a great resource, I plan to keep using for upgrades on my new Lincoln.

Regards,

Jordan

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Hello Jordan -

Nice ride, We know them well! The adjustment for your neutral safety switch is shown and explained starting on page 07-01-09 of the five volume factory shop manual set. These switches were only used for two years I believe on Lincolns and the adjustment while easy to us can be a complicated procedure to the uninitiated. The problem is that if the gear shift lever tang and /or the PRNDL detents or any other pivots are severely worn or loose in the steering column the adjustments to the N/S switch that you made will be erased when the shifter is again pushed far up into the loose Park portion area again. This switch was explained to us when these vehicles were introduced as a safety device to ensure that the engine cannot ever be started in drive or reverse even if the switch was maladjusted.

Your second problem could be a whole laundry list of one or more electrical issues such as starter motor, wiring including grounds, tune up specs such as timing , or battery etc. When you get the neutral safety switch repaired and if the slow cranking problem still exists ( which I think it will ) you will need to inspect the starter circuit components and repair as necessary. The starting/cranking circuit is also shown in the shop manuals. Let us know what you find . If you do need any of the necessary Factory Shop Manuals we have those available here at Lincoln Land.

Sincerely,

Bill