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1963 Continental Sloppy Steering

Hi Bill -

Thank you again in advance for all your help with answering our classic Lincoln mechanical questions. I recently (personally) replaced my steering my box in the '63 Sedan. The reason being was that the steering was extremely sloppy when turning to the right in a gentle curve at highway speeds. I replaced the 3 insulators as well. Everything is lined up and mounting bolts torqued down. My test drives show the steering to be extremely sloppy in the neutral position. But gentle curves to right or left are just fine. Further eval now shows that the steering box will shift or "twist" when starting to turn the wheels from neutral to right or left and then shift/twist again when achieving full turn at the end points. I described to my local mechanic who asked if the "frame is shifting where the gear is mounted." My car was an Arizona car and has essentially no rust. Any suggestions as to the cause? I do have an appointment wit h my mechanic next week. Thank you again for all your help.

Phil

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Hello Phil -

The appointment with your mechanic is a good idea. He will be in the best position to check the complete steering and suspension up close for you. Did you have all of the steering linkage examined before embarking on the steering box replacement? Any steering and suspension component can be a candidate for the cause of poor steering and excess play. We have in stock and sell all of the necessary parts for the steering on the sixties Lincolns as well as rubber bushings and suspension springs. Your mechanic should be able to make a list of any worn out parts that you need to replace in order to correct your issues. We can then give you a price and availability as well as speedy shipping service with the correct new parts.

Many early sixties Lincoln owners are opting to replace the rubber steering box mounts with metal ones because of the excess movement of the rubber. Be sure to have your mechanic inspect the "Rag Joint" that is located immediately above the steering box as well as the rebuilt box itself (even if it is rebuilt) in case of possible faulty workmanship. After the worn parts are replaced if any worn parts are identified, be sure to have an alignment expert do a complete proper steering alignment as per the shop manual specifications.

Sincerely,

Bill