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June 30, 2015

1963 AC Evaporator Drain & Follow Up

Good morning Bill -

Thank you for all the advice you provide to us Lincoln car owners. I have also had great help from your sales staff when purchasing replacement parts and assistance with installation advice.

My short question is "where is the AC evaporator drain located on my '63 sedan?"

The long part stems from nearing the end of our family 2500 mile road trip to the 2015 Eastern National meet. We had been using the AC most of the trip without issue. Good cold air (converted to 134). Passing through Ohio, it was quite stormy, humid but not terribly hot (around 80). AC was started early in the day around 10 AM. About 1 hour later, I noticed condensation around the AC vents, then around the radio selector keys. That afternoon, there was a cool mist vapor which started coming out of the AC vents. I quickly turned off the AC which stopped the blower and the vapor stopped. Tried it again 5 minutes later and even my 6 year old in the back seat noticed the "smoke". I was trying to postulate as to the cause. Next day I ran AC at 2/3 without further issue.

Fast forward to the question. Could the evaporator drain be plugged allowing water to back up? I don't recall ever seeing a puddle of water under the car like my modern vehicles do when running the AC. I have NOT seen water spilling into the interior of the car.

Thank you in advance.

Phil

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Hello Phil -

We are pleased that you are happy with our service here at Lincoln Land. Be assured also that our staff is pleased to have you as a loyal customer.

The condensate drain on your 63 should be found behind the engine at the extreme lower firewall area. It will be under the evaporator area and may not be easy to see immediately. If the a/c has been operating and cooling properly for awhile especially in the Fresh position with a hot humid outside condition some condensate should be seen draining from this area under the car and onto the ground. The dripping condensate will help you locate the drain for cleaning any partial clogs. If the a/c is operating properly and no draining at all is noticed you will need to locate and clean the drain.

Usually any vapor ( along with a slight coolant odor ) that is seen exiting into the passenger area though is indicative of a heater core leak . Temporarily bypassing the heater core and driving the car as usual will prove or disprove this possibility. On a 63 though, the evaporator is quite close to the ducts and therefore some vapor and condensing may be seen on the a/c outlet grille chrome under conditions of high humidity. However, there is another possibility that can occur to all a/c systems. The evaporator can freeze up into a block of ice with some droplets carried off into the air stream. This is usually followed by a drop in blower volume and a rise in cooling air temperature at the vents. If this freezing is in fact happening, a large amount of condensate will be seen on the ground after the engine is shut off and the car sits for a while. This can happen on your Lincoln if the programmable thermostatic switch is faulty, out of adjustment or bypassed because of a control switch failure etc. You can de-ice the evaporator ( if this icing is happening ) while driving by selecting Heat or Vent control position with the blower on high speed. This will turn off the compressor and yet allow the blower to melt any ice that is present. The 63 Shop Manual contains the vacuum and electrical diagrams along with some photos. Some skills and understanding of the operation are necessary in order to diagnose and correctly pinpoint a possible problem. I would advise you to do the above simple observation tests before condemning any component. I hope that this helps you.

Sincerely,

Bill

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Bill,

You are a Gentleman and a Scholar!!

Thank you for your detailed answer. It's all starting to make sense now. All data seems to point toward an iced over evaporator core.

Sincerely,

Phil

June 29, 2015

1971 Mark III AC Questions

Bill,

I have recently acquired a 1971 Mark III with 54,000 original miles, car is in very good condition overall. AC was blowing hot air. Compressor wire was disconnected when I got it. I reconnected wiring and compressor engages and is working as it should. I put the system under vacuum and it held vacuum for 90 minutes without dropping. So I went ahead and purged out all old R-12 that may have remained and put adapters on for 134a refrigerant. Added oil and then the proper amount of 134a to the system. Car was then blowing about 42 degrees out of vents with AC on and I was very happy. Two days later, I take it for a ride and notice what looks to be smoke/fog coming out of defroster vents inside car (AC was not on at this time). I pull over and look under the hood and there is no smoke or problems under hood. No smell of smoke in the car either. So, I think back to recent AC work and turn on AC and it is blowing hot. A leak detector was used and did alarm a bit when stuck into the defroster vents inside the car, this was a week after the AC/smoke visible in defroster vent incident.

With the limited information provided, does this seem like an evaporator leak? Is the replacement of the evaporator a tough job? Do you remove the evaporator from under the hood area or do you have to get at it from inside the car as well? Any guidance you can provide would be appreciated.

Thank you

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Greetings -

Congratulations on your recent purchase of the 71 Mark III. They are great cars to have and they are well liked by all car collectors. We look forward to helping you as our customer with repair parts as necessary to help you maintain it in good condition.

The symptom that you describe with the smoke and fog emitting from the heat/ac ducting is a common description of a classic heater core leak. Tiny amounts of anti-freeze can leak onto the hot heater core fins and then become steam. A leak in the core can usually be proven by disconnecting the heater hoses at the core and joining them together. If after driving the car a few days with the core bypassed the fog is gone, reconnect it and observe for the fog to reappear. The refrigeration system will not emit steam or fog if it develops a r134 leak. I can't tell if the charge is actually lost of course because you may not have checked the pressure in the system to find out. Hot air discharge when cool air is needed could also be a control problem.

To sum this up for you it does sound that the heater core is leaking and also that the refrigeration system has lost the charge of r134. If the a/c has indeed lost its charge I would not be at all surprised because when you purchased the car the compressor was disconnected and the system was empty. This is strong evidence of a previous undiagnosed leak. The copper evaporator coils on the Mark IIIs have proven very durable in the past, therefore the whole system should be leak tested carefully to prove a suspected leak or leaks to avoid replacing good components. A system that holds vacuum for a period of time is not absolute proof that a leak does not exist. We test for refrigerant leaks with nitrogen pressure at 120 lbs psi and if there is a drop in pressure after a good period of time, the remaining pressure can then be used to pinpoint the culprit. The heater core and evaporator core are both removed from under the hood as per the Factory Shop Manual. The evaporator will have two fasteners under the dash as well. We have new heater cores available and good used evaporators available for you as required.

Sincerely,

Bill

June 22, 2015

1964 Continental Power Steering Issues & Follow Up

Hey Bill,

I recently took my '64 Continental into a local shop for some brake issues. Those were all fixed, but while in the shop I was told the power steering lines were rotting, leaking and needed to be replaced.

I went ahead and had them do that, but then the car started making loud noises when steering. The shop claimed it was air in the hoses, but they were not able to rectify that. Ultimately, they determined that the power steering pump was bad and needed to be rebuilt as well. They quoted me $1000 to do that job, on top of what I've already had to pay for new hoses.

The car didn't have any power steering issues before I took it in, so now I'm suspect of the whole situation. I was being pressured into getting the power steering pump rebuilt because they said you can't find those for sale and if I let the old one go much longer, I
won't be able to rebuild it at all. I didn't like the pressure, so I just picked up the car and decided not to address the issue at that shop. But now I have a really loud noise from the steering and I guess I need to get that pump fixed somehow. What should I expect to have a pump rebuilt at another shop? Is $1000 the right range? Do I really have to rebuild this one or can those be found for sale out in the market?

Help!

Mercedes

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Mercedes -

While we feel sorry for you, we are well aware that most shops know absolutely nothing about these pumps and P.S. systems, and your shop could be one of them.

We have no idea what else they may have done to it and we also don't know if they allowed some debris into the lines, or if the hoses that they replaced are incorrect sizes or what fluid or additive were used.

You may want to consider talking the car to another shop for them to try to bleed the system using correct fluid and pressure test it as per the special correct shown system pressures in the Lincoln Factory Shop Manual.

If you are advised that his pump is bad, you can send it to us for inspection and we can advise you on what parts you need. There would be no charge for this other than the cost of shipping.

Sincerely,

Bill

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Hey Bill,

Thanks so much for the advice.

I will contact another shop and see if they are able to rectify the issue through bleeding and proper fluids/pressure. If this pump ends up being bad, I'll send it your way for inspection.

Thanks again!!

Mercedes

Mercedes

1979 Town Coupe Issues

Hey Bill,

I just bought a 1979 Lincoln Continental Town Coupe and am happy to say that I have fallen in love with it. Unfortunately I have developed a slight issue that only occurs in the right conditions. When I got it, I drove it an hour back and have since taken it to places close by with no problems! I had to take it deeper in the cities earlier today to go meet up with someone and the speeds were fairly slow most of the way with heavy traffic and a lot of idling. I got to my destination just fine but when I went out to leave it wouldn't start! So I popped the hood and let the engine cool as it seemed very hot and after 10 minutes it fired back up. I backed out of my spot and put it in drive, and as soon as I hit the gas it quit again, like someone just turned the key off, but it fired back up and I was on my way again. Then getting onto the highway about 5 miles from where I started I got up to 50mph and it almost died when shifting but I caught it fast enough and kept going, and after getting enough air to cool down again it ran fine. So I was wondering what you might think? I was thinking maybe the coil pack or the distributor, maybe the duraspark because I heard that is a common problem when hot. Although it has only done it this one time, I'm worried it may start occurring earlier and I want to jump the gun on it.

Thanks a Bunch!

Sam

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Sam -

Yes, could be Duraspark, or could be carburetor, or fuel delivery or could be overheating etc. How are the spark plugs and high tension wiring? You have only recently purchased this vehicle and probably have no real detailed knowledge of its maintenance history. A 36 year old car of any brand can develop many unknown and common tune up issues over the years. It appears that on scene diagnosis is in your future by someone who is familiar with the fuel and ignition electronics in your 1979 Town Car. I am sorry that I cannot pinpoint your issue or issues from here without any diagnosis.

Sincerely,

Bill

1975 Mark IV Blower Motor Cover Removal

Good afternoon guys -

I have a quick question about removing the blower motor lower cover. There is a screw near the firewall toward the driver side. It is virtually impossible to reach due to the ambient air hose fitting serving the sensor. I can loosen the screw by snaking a socket extension up there, but I'm worried I won't be able to get it started back when replacing the cover due to the angle. Is there a trick to this? In other words, can the fitting be removed or loosened from the engine side to get it out of the way? As you all know, the manuals are a little lacking in information on details like this.

Thanks!!

Jim

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Hello Jim -

You are correct. Sometimes the manuals are a little sparse in certain areas. The removal section the in Mark IV section does not show the removal for the blower motor in the Factory Service manual but the Thunderbird section on page 36-45-11 has a very clear step by step procedure that should help you. The Tbird and Mark uses the same HVAC units. Figure 15 on page 36-45 16 has a great drawing of the removal and installation fasteners. I notice that the lower tabs on the lower housing at the firewall are open slotted so that complete removal of the two screws may not necessary. We do not have problems with this procedure but we do find that in some cases we need to carefully and cleverly configure our extensions and sockets etc. in order to reach some areas. If you do not have these important sections in your manual, contact George at our office and he will look after this for you. Hope this helps.

Sincerely,

Bill

June 18, 2015

1977 Mark V AC Questions & Update

Hi,

I am currently having a problem with my AC on my 1977 Lincoln Continental Mark V. It only blows hot air. There is an HVAC located under the dash that is not connected to anything. However, when I suck on the HVAC the AC begins to work correctly and blow cold air. I can't find where to connect the HVAC to. Any ideas? I could send a picture if that would be of any help.

Sam

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Greetings Sam -

Yes, please send a "clear" photo and I may be able to identify the part that is disconnected. Sometimes certain vacuum lines are pulled off from a certain servo by owners or technicians in order to overcome the lack of needed heat in the car that is due to a another component that has failed. Your description is not uncommon for a part that is well known to fail. If I identify the part it will be up to you to find and reconnect the vacuum hose to the servo. Skills here would be very helpful and you may need the vacuum schematic for this. You will probably also need to replace the failed part that I mentioned above. It is a popular fail item that we usually have in stock. Be prepared to purchase this part from us and become another satisfied Lincoln Land customer. We will wait for your photo to arrive and then proceed to the next step.

Sincerely,

Bill

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View image

Here you are Sir, here is the photo you asked for

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Hi Sam -

Your photo is clearly showing a disconnected vacuum hose. Is that what you are referring to as a disconnected Hvac? If I understand you correctly you are saying that if you apply vacuum to this hose, the Heating Ventilating Air Conditioning (HVAC) system starts to operate on a/c. If that is true, you will need to find the disconnect under the dash and connect it properly. This I cannot do from here. Your photo also seems to reveal other wiring or vacuum hoses that may be in a state of disarray under the dash. Wiring and vacuum schematics/diagrams may be required in order to correct this and any other parts that are disconnected or misconnected.

Sincerely,

Bill

June 17, 2015

1979 Mark V Instrument Panel Lights, Door Chime Questions

Hi Bill,

Dumb question but are ***all*** the lamps on the idiot panel suppose to light up when the key is turned to "on?" (All of mine don't come on, only about four of them.)

I have a picture of the idiot panel. (1979 Bill Blass Mark V.)

All the bulbs are new and I don't see any burnt/black marks on the backside of the panel.

Also, I have that nice, melodic sounding seat belt warning chime. Even though I've taken it a part and rebuilt it/cleaned it up, and the wires appear to be grounded and not torn anywhere (because I have the inside gutted and carpet pulled), it doesn't chime and that makes me sad.

Do you have any suggestions regarding the chime and do you know if all of the bulbs should light up when the key is first turned to "on."

Thanks a million,

Paul

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Greetings Paul -

Some of these warning lights can be confusing at times because there are so many of them that can light up at various times. Fortunately FoMoCo has included a full explanation of their operation in your owners manual on pages 10 through to 12. These little manuals are handy for owners to read up and learn the operation and function of the many features of their car.

The seat belt warning chime feature has several other electric components included in that circuit in addition to the chime module that you have apparently "rebuilt". When you rebuilt that chime unit, you must have bench checked it and verified that it was then operable as part of the repair. At Lincoln Land we are able to substitute good known units that we have on hand to test them first. If the chime then operates as designed with the replaced part, the repair is complete. If the original chime module in the vehicle proves o/k however we move to the next step and refer to page 34-30-6 of the 1979 Shop Manual in order to diagnose the remaining components of the circuit according to the diagram. We then replace any units that are diagnosed as faulty in the tests. If you find that you need any of these parts for your repair we should have them available. Do you have a parts account with us at the present time?

Sincerely,

Bill

June 16, 2015

1976 Town Car Windows Not Working

Bill -

Here a question from the Netherlands. I have a Continental Town Car from 1976. And none of the windows work. Now I read somewhere that there must be a switch or relay that can cut out the whole circus ( I remember my Rover sedan had one in the glovebox). Now I have been looking but can not find one. Is there one in the car or do I have to dig for the problem?

Thanks.

Jef

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Jef -

The Factory Shop Manual, as well as the Wiring Diagram both show the Relay located on the Firewall for the AC and the Power Windows. Both of these items are well worth the investment if you are planning on keeping the car. Lincoln Land can supply you with both.

Sincerely,

Bill

1969 Mark III Restart Issues

Hi Bill -

I have a 69 Mark III with 37k miles. Car runs just about perfectly (idle is very smooth, definitely has full power) except for a minor issue.

When restarting the car when it's hot, sometimes it starts then immediately dies. It may take 5 to 6 times to finally restart the car, each time I crank it, the car fires immediately then dies. The symptoms remind me of a bad ballast resistor in the early 70s Chryslers. Pumping the pedal does not expedite the starting procedure.

I took the air cleaner off while trying to start it and the choke is clearly open (which it should be). If anything, it feels like the car floods itself. However, once the car restarts, it doesn't behave as if it was flooded (i.e., no chugging smoke, no rough idle, no need to keep foot on the throttle to clear out unburned fuel). When it does restart, it simply settles into a smooth idle.

Any ideas what's going on? Is this typical for these cars? Have owned the car for 4 years and don't recall having this issue before this year. Is there a ballast resistor on these cars?

Adam

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Hello Adam -

It is not unusual for all cars to develop a variety of starting and running problems over a period of time. To answer your questions though.....No, I do not know what is going on at this time. You haven't given us any useful diagnosis information that would help anyone try to pinpoint your problem without guessing......Yes, this could be considered typical for these Lincolns and all other cars that may be in dire need of a tune up or that could have a carburetor issue or old fuel etc......Yes, there is an ignition resistor under the dash installed and hidden in the main wiring harness. The ignition part of the wiring diagram will show this and the Shop Manual describes the replacement procedure. It is difficult to get to but of course could be tested under the hood and verified for proper voltage to the coil. These resistor wires are not known as a common failure item on these cars. Hope this helps you diagnose your starting problems. When you are ready, we can supply you with all of the quality tune up items etc. that you may need.

Sincerely,

Bill

1969 Continental Lighting Issues

Hi Bill,

My wife and I just bought a 1969 Lincoln Continental last week and we couldn't be happier. It's in great shape outside and inside. Most all the electronics are still working as well. The question I have is with the blinkers. When I use the turn signal on the steering column, I hear it click but the lights won't come on and neither will the indicators on the dash. When I hit the hazard button all 4 blinkers come on and flash. Am I looking at a problem in the steering column with it not being engaged? Found your website, which is great by the way, and thought I would ask you. I order the shop manuals and those should be in next week.

Thanks for your time.

Kyle

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Greetings Kyle -

Congratulations on your recent purchase. Both of the 1969 Continental model styles are great vehicles.

Your turn signal problem is a common issue with all brands of cars and a necessary safety feature to have working. I am surprised that you have no information from the previous owner on this matter from the time of sale to you. As it is, I haven't much in the way any of meaningful diagnostic information to work with in order to really help you at this time. However, I can provide a small list of common failures for you to consider. These are...the turn signal flasher unit (not the 4way flasher unit), the turn signal switch, the t/s fuse or a broken wire somewhere. If you can test and provide me with the colors of the two wires that have 12v of power at the steering column turn signal wiring harness connector with the ignition key in the run position and the turn signals and four way flashers in the off position I may be able to get you closer to the actual problem. We do hope to be able to serve you in the future regarding parts etc. for your Continental as this informational blog is designed to help our Lincoln Land customers.

Sincerely,

Bill

June 11, 2015

1961 Continental AC Cutting Out & Follow Up

Bill -

I have a 1961 Lincoln Continental that has developed a strange AC issue this spring. When I start the car and let it idle the AC is just fine -- cold, strong fan, no problems. As soon as I put the car in Drive, the AC goes off completely. We've done extensive checking of the vacuum lines and have replaced any with leaks or potential leaks. Someone suggested checking the "basketball" in the right front fender, and another Lincoln buddy thinks it might be the conduit plate in the steering wheel that is connected to the gear indicator and actuates the door locks when the car is put in Drive.

Any thoughts? Do you all carry that conduit plate?

Dave

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Hello Dave -

The AC controls on the 61-2 are well known to have these kinds of problems at some point in time so I am not surprised that you are experiencing some issues. Many of these issues are indeed caused by vacuum leaks.

When you state that the AC goes off completely when you select drive, I can't tell if it goes off when you accelerate in drive, or are idling in drive. I also can't tell if the air gets warm, or if the blower stops also. In any case your statements do sound like loss of vacuum of some sort in the AC/Heater control system. Vacuum can be lost from a leak or leaks at any area where the vacuum is routed. Popular vacuum leak areas for your car are......the main control switch, the vacuum reservoir, system check valve, any vacuum servo or at any vacuum line, etc. One way for you to diagnose for or confirm a vacuum leak would be to "T" in a vacuum test gauge to the vacuum line that supplies the main AC/Heater switch and then start the engine while watching the gauge reading and observing the AC properly operating nicely while idling in neutral. At this time select drive and as the AC "cuts out" as usual, observe the gauge for a significant vacuum drop. If the gauge indicates a drop in vacuum when the AC "quits" then you need to test individual components in order to find and pinpoint that leak or leaks. A vacuum diagram and testing skills are usually needed to avoid guessing and replacing parts that are not defective.

The door locks do not automatically actuate when drive is selected on a 1961 Lincoln as your friend suggests. However we do carry in stock or have easy access to most of the parts to repair your 1961 Lincoln.

By the way Dave, do you currently have a parts account with us at this time?

Sincerely,

Bill

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Bill,

Thanks so much for this information. We will proceed following your guidance. In response to your questions, the AC goes off when I put the car in drive as a rule; however, last weekend, I put it in drive and it kept running until I began to accelerate, then it shut down. It seems to me that the blower just stops when the ac goes off.

We will go through the vacuum checks (again), and follow your guidance. If we need any parts, I'll be in touch with you. I don't think I have an account with you, but I think I have bought some parts from you for my 1960 Lincoln some years back. Appreciate your time and great guidance!

Dave

June 8, 2015

1978 Mark V Starting Issues

Hello Bill -

We have a 1978 Continental Mark V having some starting problems. It has the 400 engine.

Sometimes both when cold and also when it is warm we only hear a relay when we turn the key, we have tried both in park and in neutral but not any difference.

Other times when we just have stopped and shall start again, the engine crank, but it will not ignite at all until we have tried several times , but when we release the key quickly back it seems that the engine is about to start .

Spark plugs look almost like new .

Have also tried starting gas, but it did not ignite with that either.

Other times it start by only showing the keys J

Do you know anything about this ?

Best regards

PJ

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Greetings -

Your first problem with the "relay click only" when the key is rotated to the start position sounds like it could be a simple cable problem from the battery to ground, to the starter relay, or the starter relay itself on the right side near the battery, the cable from that relay to the starter or the starter itself. On site diagnosis will be required in order to pinpoint or eliminate these suspects.

The second issue of "crank but no start" can be due to ignition or fuel delivery problems. Again, proper diagnosis as per the shop manual will be required. The ignition system is electronic and contains modules inside of the distributor and one on the left fender shield under the hood that can easily fail or become intermittent and are well known to cause these kinds of symptoms. The shop manual explains the operation and the diagnostic procedures. I have no knowledge of the condition of your ignition or fuel delivery system or tune up maintenance, but I do know without some sort of meaningful diagnosing you will be stuck with guessing. You may get lucky with guessing or it could become expensive and time consuming.

Your third and last description of "other times it start by showing the keys" makes no real sense to me. Let us know if you need any parts as we stock many items at Lincoln Land that will correct your issues.

Sincerely,

Bill

June 4, 2015

1971 Mark Exhaust Questions And Update Of Work In Progress

Bill,

Work continues correcting minor issues and sloppy previous repairs on my Mark III with 91K miles. Most recently, I needed to replace the badly damaged transmission dipstick tube and decided to remove the old crimped and abandoned emissions tube while working in that area. I gave up trying to work on the back of the passenger side of the engine with the A/C and heat plenum in place, so I decided to disconnect the exhaust from the manifold and remove the Sure-Track actuator to gain access from underneath. Fortunately, the only broken part during the process was a speed nut holding the actuator bracket.

After a few days and applications of penetrating oil, the exhaust fasteners came loose, but I ended up with one stud coming out of each manifold, and the other stayed put and the nut came off. I've attached a few pictures of the passenger side, and the driver's side it similar. I am likely going to have the entire exhaust system replaced with a correct system soon. The previous owner had only the mufflers and tailpipes without resonators replaced, and the work looks unprofessional. I want to minimize potential damage to the manifolds now as well as when the existing system is replaced later. Should I just re-use the exhaust system nuts and stud/nut combinations? What else should I do for reassembly at this time?

Bradley

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Bradley -

Good that you are installing resonators. They do contribute to a quiet exhaust. It is also important to make sure that the exhaust pipes have a crossover built in as well for an even quieter factory correct Lincoln Continental system. We always assemble the exhaust systems in the same way as the factory using new manifold to exhaust pipe sealing "donuts". You would be well advised to use new studs and nuts if the removed ones are damaged or worn. Of course your new pipes will need to align reasonably straight on to the manifold to create and maintain a good leak free seal.

Sincerely,

Bill