« 1979 Mark V Electrical Issues | Main | 1971 Mark III Headlight Door Issues »

1966 Lincoln Continental Starter Issues & Follow Up...

Hello Bill,

I have a 1966 Lincoln Continental that I'm restoring. For some reason the starter keeps trying to start the car after I turn the key off. I've put on a new starter and new starter solenoid. Have any idea why it could be doing this?

Thanks for any help,

Doug

----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------

Hello Doug -

If I am understanding you correctly, the engine runs fine until you shut it off. At that time the engine turns off but the starter then engages with the key in the off position and then proceeds to crank the engine as you state " For some reason the Starter keeps trying to start the car after I turn the key off". This would be unusual as the ignition switch would at that time need to send power to the starter solenoid S wire with the key in the off position. If this is true I would first want to test the ignition switch for a possible short inside in the off position. The other much more common scenario occurs with a running engine when with the key turned to the ignition off position the engine continues to run slowly and rough for a short period of time and then finally stops. This can happen when the engine is at normal hot operating temperature but the engine idle speed is much too high This is known as engine "run on" or "dieseling". Adjusting the idle speed will usually correct this issue. Which of the above describes your problem accurately?

Sincerely,

Bill

----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------

Bill -

Actually I haven't got the car running yet. It turns over fine but when I turn the key off it will keep trying to turn over.

Doug

----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------

Doug -

Oh oh, slightly different wording. That changes things. The new starter solenoid could have temporarily fused itself inside because of long periods of engine cranking, high starter draw, poor battery cables, low battery charge or poor quality solenoid. If you tap the solenoid when this happens and the cranking stops when and IF the fused contact inside the solenoid do release, you will have found the problem. Next step is to correct the cause by testing and being absolutely sure that the above items (starter , cables, battery and solenoid) are in very good order and up to the task. Long periods of slow cranking with a tight engine and a high draw starter can and usually will be detrimental to the starting circuit.

Sincerely,

Bill