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September 26, 2014

1966 Lincoln Continental Cooling Issues

Hi Bill,

Let me start by saying; I believe any classic Lincoln enthusiast would agree that you, and your forum are invaluable, and the staff at Lincoln Land provides some of the best customer service I've experienced.

So, here's my situation. I live in Phoenix, and at the beginning of the summer i got out of my car after driving about 15-20 miles, and a few minutes later, i saw coolant running steadily from all over the front of my car. I waited until the car was cooled down (6-7 hours) and checked the expansion reservoir and it was dry. Long story short, after a bit of simple trouble shooting (thermostat, radiator cap, hoses, observation...) i finally discovered a hair line crack about 1.5" long about 3 inches down, along the right side of my transmission cooler, i wasn't stressing because i intended on overhauling the entire thing anyway. I need help with determining whats best for the life and efficiency of this car because i am getting mixed signals. Is it worth it to buy new, particular replacement parts, or refurbish the original parts? if yes, what would you recommend?

Side question. what is your opinion on aftermarket carbs if i am looking for, 1. efficiency 2. fuel economy? have you ever seen a 66 fuel injected? (not sure if that's possible.

Thanks again, you guys are the best -

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Greetings -

We are glad that you enjoy the blog. New parts when they are available from FORD are of course the best way to go with many items but now after 48 years, they are scarce. Many new parts are still available from quality aftermarket suppliers. We try to choose the best of the best for our customers when we can while offering alternatives according to the owners specific wishes.

Your radiator can be serviced properly by a good known radiator shop in your area. Depending on the condition of your radiator they will repair the leak and "rod out the core"or if it has suffered from poor coolant maintenance over the years and is a high mileage car it may require replacement of the core. In any case a good shop will advise you honestly and correctly.

Again, and according to your car's odometer reading your carburetor can be cleaned and successfully serviced internally if you have a carburetor issue. However, many owners have been very pleased with installing the available aftermarket new carburetors when their original carburetors are worn out. A new carburetor is the best choice in many cases. Please contact us for further information on any service or replacement parts.

We cannot offer any information on a fuel injection installation for a 1966 Lincoln. Inquiries such as this at Lincoln Land are rare and we usually refer our customers to the engine specialty shops for the latest product information.

The best fuel efficiency on older luxury collector vehicles such as yours can be realistically attained by maintaining a high state of accurate tune up conditions on your engine along with good driving habits. These engines were not designed with a great measure of "fuel economy" in mind . In our experience, spending a great deal of money in this regard only results in a lighter wallet for the owner.

Please call for any further information that you may require.

Sincerely,

Bill

September 25, 2014

1970 Mark III Ignition Concerns

Bill -

I have a 1970 MK III, with a later model tilt steering wheel; Not sure what year.

Problem is that the ignition switch has gotten progressively harder and harder to turn. The key tumbler has been replaced. I had the steering column removed and thoroughly cleaned and a new igniting switch down on the lower column installed. Was a little better, but over time has gotten worse.

Oddly it gets much worse in very cold weather. Another clue is that it is a little easier to turn the key when I tilt the wheel all the way down.

Any ideas what may be the problem?

Thanks,

Paul

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Hi Paul -

Not knowing what steering column you have I would remove the key tumbler and operate the unit with a screw driver blade and check for binding. If it still binds I would then disconnect the ignition switch on lower part of the column and recheck the operation. If it still binds then you will know that you have a problem behind the tumbler area. The inside of the upper column would then need to be inspected. If the binding stops when either the tumbler or the ign. is disconnected you will have uncovered the problem location at that point. If it is easier to operate with the wheel tilted to another position as you have stated, I would think that the problem would be some sort of interference or damage inside the hub near the tilt mechanism or the locking pin that locks the steering wheel. In any case you would need to isolate the bind as I have suggested above and then examine that suspected area closely and repair as necessary. Sometimes a dab of grease in the right spot can correct the issue.

Sincerely,

Bill

September 15, 2014

1965 Continental Possible Carb Issues?

Hi Bill,

I was hoping you could help me. My Lincoln (430) was having carburetor issues, at least so I thought. I bolted up a new 600cfm Edelbrock and am having similar issues. Popping thru exhaust and run on sometimes. Any help or direction will be appreciated. New plugs, wires, points, condensor.

Thank you,

Geri

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Hello Geri -

Your symptom information is a little sparse so other than common and accurate tune up diagnosis and the possibility of timing chain issues etc., I am going to refer you to our January 21, 2013 blog question and reply below:


1965 Continental Is Sluggish

Hi Bill,

I have been working on a customers 65 Continental for a couple of months now. He brought it to me saying it shut off on him one day and when he started it back up it was running rough and had little power. I have have been through this thing in and out, top and bottom. Did all the usual diagnosis stuff and have changed parts as I have found defects. The car was running rough at idle and would break up real bad when trying to accelerate, popping back back through the carburetor and smelling very rich. The first thing I did was rebuild the distributor, it wasn't advancing and the plate was very corroded. That didn't help at all. I pulled the timing cover to check the chain and marks and that was fine so I pulled the intake and discovered the lifters were seizing in the bores. I cleaned the bores, installed a new camshaft, lifters and timing chain set. While I had it that far down I sent the heads to the machine shop and 500 bucks later they were fixed with a few valves and all new springs. All the rockers are free and pushrods not bent. After all that the car idles as smooth as a brand new car, but still have no power and can barely accelerate. New coil, 12 volts to the coil, new cap and rotor, timing set at 10 degrees ( have tried it from 6 to 16 degrees), 5-6psi fuel pressure at the carb, new helper fuel pump near the tank, compression is 130-140 on every cylinder after warm-up. After all this the car still has very little power, breaks up during acceleration and is still slightly popping through the carburetor at WOT. You can see a mist of fuel with a flashlight coming out of the top of the carb while power breaking it at half throttle. I've hit a brick wall with this one, its the first 430 Ive ever worked on, I'm too far in it to stop now. Any ideas or advice? Thanks so much.

Andy

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Greetings Andy -

After reviewing your letter several times and reading what you have done so far with this engine and assuming that all of your work has been done correctly as per the engine's specifications etc. I can offer the following. The factory exhaust systems on these engines use a " double wall" exhaust pipe. These of course are the pipes that bolt up to the exhaust manifolds and continue on to the next flange connection rearward. It is not unheard of for the inner pipe to develop a separation in such a way as to severely seal up the exhaust on one side enough to cause the symptoms that you are describing. When this occurs the outer wall remains intact and no exhaust leak is heard. Because of the exhaust heat factor this final "plug up" can take place in a very short period of time as your customer has described to you. If the vehicle has the original style pipes on it you should remove them for a careful internal inspection.

Two other items to be aware of when tuning or servicing this era of engine are...The damper pulley on the crankshaft can separate from the rubber damper material and give you an incorrect timing reading. These are available rebuilt. The second is that the vacuum advance units on the distributor are well known to seize or rupture and become inoperative. These are available new.

I hope that the above helps you and I would ask you to let us know here at Lincoln Land what you find.

Sincerely,

Bill

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1965 Continental Is Sluggish - Update

Bill I can't thank you enough for the advice, I unbolted the exhaust just before the muffler's and sure enough the passenger side exhaust pipe was clogged shut. I ran 2 new pipes from the manifolds to the mufflers and the car runs perfect!! I've run into double walled exhaust pipe problems before but 99% of those cases were on Honda's. I had no idea these Lincolns were manufactured with it and probably never would have checked it.

Thanks again,

Andy.


Does that sound at all similar to your problems? It will be necessary for someone to perform precise and meaningful diagnosis in order to avoid replacing parts that are not faulty.

Run on is usually caused by too fast of an engine idle but correcting your main concern may also eliminate the run on. Let us know what you find out.

Sincerely,

Bill

September 9, 2014

1995 Town Car Shifter Won't Move

Bill -

When I start the engine and try to put it in gear, but the shifter won't move. I have to turn the key without turning on the car to get it to move. Then have to fire up in neutral. What can I do?

Sincerely,

Luke

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Luke -

This is not an uncommon problem. That system that won't allow you to shift from Park is known as " shift lock". It is operated electrically by the brake light switch under the dash and therefore your brake lights may also be inoperative. It is possible that the switch is out of adjustment, faulty or disconnected etc. and can be an easy fix in most cases. If you are repairing it yourself you will need to check that switch first with a test light and a wiring diagram. If you are not skilled in these repairs you can have it serviced by any local automotive repair shop. I would ask them first if they are familiar with this "shift lock" feature before allowing them to repair it though. As mentioned above, this problem is well known in the trade so you should make sure that the shop is capable in order to save yourself unnecessary costly diagnostic expense.

Sincerely,

Bill

1963 Continental Engine Noise & Follow Up

Hi Bill,

My 1963 Continental just had the engine completely rebuilt; all new bearings, a valve job, new lifters, gaskets, etc. At the same time the carburetor, alternator, power steering pump, water pump, fan clutch, fuel pump, all hoses and belts were replaced (or rebuilt). The engine is working well except for an annoying rhythmic squeak when it is idling and up to temperature. When the engine is cold, there is no discernible noise. And, the squeak either goes away at higher RPMs, or is covered by the sound from the engine and fan.

The noise appears to be coming from the right front of the engine and seems to be internal rather than external. I have used a mechanics stethoscope to try to locate the noise with little success. The only time I seem to be able to hear it is at the intake manifold at the front where the first attaching bolt is located. But even that is questionable. Any thoughts?


Steve

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Hello Steve -

An internal squeak from an engine that has recently been rebuilt as you describe sounds like a vital part is not being lubricated properly. The car should really be sent by flatbed truck to the rebuilders of the engine for them to diagnose before possible damage can occur. If you wish to check a few possibilities yourself you could do the following. Install a " master oil pressure gauge" to the oil pressure switch port on the engine, remove the valve covers and observe the oil pressure as the engine warms to full operating temperature. The oil pressure should be well into the correct specification for a freshly rebuilt engine if all is well. At the same time you can visually inspect the upper engine for correct oiling action and possibly diagnose a problem in this area.

Sincerely,

Bill

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Hi Bill,

This is a follow up to my earlier posted question (link above). After a great deal of investigation the squeak I mentioned was isolated to the rebuilt power steering pump which had been installed as part of the engine rebuild. Neither I nor my mechanic knew there was a filter in the power steering reservoir, and after the filter was replaced the noise went away for a few days. It has come back however which has me totally stumped. It would appear to me that somehow it has to do with the system maintaining the proper pressure. When the old filter was removed it appeared it was the original one, although is didn't seem to be clogged. Also, I believe the old owner used power steering fluid instead of ATF fluid in the system (which was flushed and is now ATF). Any thoughts about this mystery? Does it make sense to remove the filter entirely as I understand John Cashman recommends doing just that? Thanks for your input.

Steve

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Hi Steve -

Not being there with the vehicle and actually hearing this noise makes it almost impossible to accurately diagnose or pinpoint the location of a squeak from here. I will say though that I cannot believe that a power steering system will make an actual internal "squeaking" noise if it contains lubricating fluid of any sort. If there is a fault in the pump or any other problem in the p/s the noises that are emitted are not unlubricated dry metal squeaks. The noises would be whining or grinding sounds etc. We do not in any case advise omitting any filters in an effort to eliminate or mask problems. If you believe that the squeak is internal to the pump you should now consult with the rebuilder of the pump for advice.

Sincerely,

Bill

September 8, 2014

1969 Mark III AC Questions

Hello Bill,

Just wanted to let you know that a while back I emailed you about the battery draining as a result of some electrical issue. You narrowed it down to the starter relay/solenoid. I replaced it and it solved the problem. Thanks for the help!

This is about the AC system. I had the entire system completely restored. Every component is brand new with the exception of the evaporator which was "restored".

Yesterday it was 90 degrees here so it probably wasn't the best day to charge the system for the first time.

In any event, here is what I've done so far:

Charged the system with 48 ounces of R-12. Shop manual indicated small cans in the day were in 16 oz cans and to use 3 for a complete charge. I double checked pressures today with an outside temp of 66 degrees. Low "suction" side was stabilized at roughly 35 psi. High "discharge" side was at roughly 165 psi and increased only slightly but stayed below 200 psi. Throughout the duration of this test, the pressures pretty much stayed at the stated numbers with only slight deviations (~1-3 psi).

This leads me to believe that the expansion valve and rest of the system (at least the components under the hood) are working properly. The compressor is engaged and is silent. No lines at the evaporator are icing up. The larger pipe on evaporator as well as the line to suction side of compressor is cold. The lower (smaller) pipe on evaporator is cold before the expansion valve and the opposite side of the expansion valve (small line that runs to accumulator) is warm. I'm not sure if either side of the TEV is supposed to be different temps. I have covered the TEV bulb at suction line with plumbers putty to make sure it is insulated.

With all this being said, the air coming out of the vents with the control lever on HIGH and temp control at 65 is only 60 degrees at idle. When I drive it, it gets to roughly 48 (on a cool day, on a hot day it stays at around 60). It's been my experience that the register air should be around 40 degrees and maybe even get a little colder once the engine RPM's pick up. I'm not familiar with the older systems.

Is it possible there are other issues such as mode door actuators that are not working properly ? When I change temp control to higher temps, heat does come out of the correct ducts but the AC is just not as cold as I think it should be. Please help!

Thanks,

Dan

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Hi Dan -

The a/c system on the 69-71 Marks will perform very well when all of the components are in good working order. Your outlet temperature of 60 degrees on a hot day of 80-85 ambient is too high if the controls are set at 65 degrees on High Range and the control system has responded accordingly with all features operating correctly. There are several items that are easily overlooked when diagnosing however that can contribute to this high outlet temperature. Assuming that all of the components that you have stated were restored or replaced etc. are indeed in good working order I can suggest the following for you to address. Your r12 charge of 3 lbs. is incorrect. The r12 charge for this system is 2 1/4- 2 1/2 lbs. max ( 36-40 oz ). The 8-12 ounces that you are overcharged can and usually will cause problems on hot and humid daytime outside temperatures. On those days of high outside temperatures and high humidity, the following two items must also be operating as designed. They are the vacuum controlled Water Valve and the Recirculation door device located in the air inlet system to the blower. The water valve module will receive vacuum to close the valve in the high cooling mode. Even if this valve is correctly receiving vacuum and appears to be operating o/k on the outside, it may not be sealing properly on the inside. It must be removed, examined and tested to be sure that it is completely sealing internally when vacuum is applied. I have seen some valves that have failed and cause a 6 degree rise to the outlet temp. on hot days. The recirc. door can be checked for operation by hearing the blower become louder when it opens and draws in air from the right cowl kick pad area. The correct operation as designed of the above two items is very important for all automotive air conditioners of this era on hot days. Another component to consider that you may have already checked is the thermostatic fan clutch that controls the engine cooling fan. On hot days it must engage at idle and low speeds in order to cool the engine and at the same time pull additional air through the a/c condenser. The above suggestions are good places for you to start and I hope that they will help you find an easy problem to correct.

Sincerely,

Bill

September 2, 2014

2001 Continental Dies After Starting

Hi Bill,

I have a 2001 Lincoln Continental limited series and I was trying to see what my problem with my car could be because when cranked it dies right back out as well as the lights an radio have been blinking off an on. I had my battery checked an its fully charged no dead cell.

Thank you for your time.

Trish

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Hello Trish -

I would move on to first check all of the battery cables and grounds as well as all of the main cables and wiring to the major power points and fuse boxes etc. as well as the starter circuits. With these complex newer vehicles and electronics a good technician with the proper manuals and test equipment may be necessary.

Sincerely,

Bill

1969 Starting Issues

Hi there!!

I'm a very proud new owner of a 1969 Continental and am doing a restoration, cars in fairly decent shape but does need work. One of the things I'm trying to figure out is why I only hear the starter solenoid on the fender click when I turn the key? It used to work and the car runs good , did have charging issues and after sitting for 10 years I changed some stuff anyways like battery, alternator, voltage regulator and starter solenoid. But still can't get it to start by key consistently, have to jump s terminal to battery terminal on the solenoid, so I'm assuming starter is okay when I do that as it will start then.

Clay

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Hi Clay -

Congratulations on your recent purchase. They are great Lincolns. If the starter does not engage when you turn the key to the start position you should test for power at the S terminal wire at the solenoid on the fender. That wire should be red with a blue stripe. If there is no power there at that terminal with the ignition switch in the start position and jumping that terminal to the positive battery post engages the starter then the cranking circuit must be tested from the Ignition switch to the Neutral Safety switch and to the solenoid. The Neutral Safety Switch could be faulty or out of adjustment , the ignition switch itself could be faulty or there could be a bad connection at any part of that red and blue wire in that circuit. The Shop Manual explains the special N.S. switch adjustments for the 1969 Lincoln in the transmission section. Call our office if you need the Shop Manuals.

Sincerely,

Bill