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April 29, 2013

1978 Mark Steering Issues

Bill,
My stepfather owned a 1978 Lincoln Mark V ...sadly he passed away last year and I have been trying to get it running since he passed.

With a lot of patience we managed to get it roadworthy again and it is quite the car only 44,007 kms (approx. 27.5000 miles) The only problem I am still trying to resolve is the excessive play in the steering wheel. At present, there is approx. an inch of play in the wheel and I'm pretty sure that's more than what it should be. I know there is an adjustment screw on the top of the steering box but I'm thinking this is more for fine tuning vs. the amount of play I am experiencing.

As an experience pro can you offer me any suggestions? I've checked the underneath of the car and the steering components appear to be fine ...is there a chance this could be a steering column problem? Or, should I try adjusting the steering box first to see if I can get the play out?

Any insight you can offer would be greatly appreciated ...best regards.

Sincerely,

M.J.

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M.J. -

Nice to hear that you are keeping that Mark in the family. If you are seeing excess steering play do NOT adjust the steering gear box first. Instead do a complete examination of the steering components first. If you are not confident in doing this correctly yourself with the help of a friend do take the car to a trusted front end shop. This examination will include the very popular flexible Coupler or "rag joint" that is located between the steering box and the steering column shaft. This coupler is well known to fail and is relatively inexpensive to replace. The steering box will also be inspected carefully for excess play of its interior components as well as all of the other steering connectors between the box and the wheels. The total sum of all of the looseness will give you the amount of play that you are concerned with. From the sound of your post I think that the above mentioned coupler would be my first guess as the culprit.

Sincerely,

Bill

1997 Town Car Starting Issues

Bill -

Recently my 97' Town Car has been having issues starting, especially when cold. I'll have to turn it over a few times and when it does start it sputters a bit before it roars to life. Any idea what might be happening?

Sincerely,

Leo

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Leo -

What have you done so far to correct this issue? Do you know the tune up maintenance history of the car and basic engine condition? If this information is unknown you should begin by performing basic tune up procedures which will include new quality high tension wiring and spark plugs as well as engine filters and battery condition etc. A possible neglected engine at 16 years old regardless of mileage will display exactly the symptoms that you are describing. If the above is found to be in good order then a visit to an automotive shop near your location that is skilled in the diagnosis and repair of the electronic engine controls etc. of these engines will be necessary in order to avoid guessing and replacing parts that are already in good working order.

Sincerely,

Bill

April 25, 2013

1966 Continental Sedan Window Relay Questions

Hi Bill,

I have a question regarding the power window relays in my 1966 Lincoln Continental 4 door sedan, the master safety relay specifically. I am in the middle of getting all my power windows functional again. I have gotten all my switches back from being rebuilt (except the drivers side master control) and I tried testing a few out but they didn't work. I wasn't concerned about the switches being faulty (they aren't) so I have been chasing the electrical issue. All four up down relays are good, but when it came time to test the Safety relay I unfortunately discovered that it wasn't even there! My questions!..

1. Could this prevent all the switches from working (again I have only tested the three door controls I have gotten back). I wasn't sure if it acted like an open circuit in the system or something, I'm kind of electric impaired. That being said, is there any other things I should trouble shoot (other than motors which I know are good)

2. After 4 months of owning the car I'm starting to believe that the 66 Continental is the hardest to find parts for. I have looked everywhere for that relay and I found one for $175, and I came across Lincoln Land which rebuilds but it is a mandatory exchange. Do you guys have 1 that I could buy? or what would you recommend doing? I appreciate you letting me pick your brain on the matter.


Greg

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Hello Greg,

Without the power window safety relay the windows will only work when the By-pass switch is activated along with one of the window switches. On a complete working system the windows will also operate with the key in the Run or Acc. position. We certainly can supply you with a P/W safety relay if yours is missing but are you looking for this relay in the correct location? Call Lincoln Land and ask for Al. He will advise you exactly where this relay is located and at the same time be able to give you details of our replacements. Do you have a Service Manual with a correct wiring diagram?

Sincerely,

Bill

April 10, 2013

1971 Mark III Temperature Questions

Bill,

I have a 1971 Lincoln Mark lll with original mileage 61,500 and original radiator. The car operates OK temperature (half way mark on gauge) at highway speed, however at in town stop and start or a little slow traffic it tends to overheat.

I checked it with a laser gauge at several locations and it checked at 220 to 225F at idle.

Please advise standard operating temperature, also is there a larger radiator available for the Mark III?

Any help with this is much appreciated.

Best regards,

Gene

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Greetings Gene -

Using a laser temperature gauge is a nice idea but we cannot rely on laser temperature readings to decide if an engine is overheating. To use this method correctly one would need to compare all of the readings and reading location areas with a similar engine that does not have an overheating problem. There is also no published correct laser temperature readings for a technician to compare with. The owners manuals and shop manuals usually point out where the temperature needle on your instrument cluster should read at certain times and and driving conditions. Many times a normal elevated reading is misinterpreted as an overheated engine. Your concerns of overheating of course are very valid and should be carefully and correctly verified. At Lincoln Land we would carefully check out your important cooling system components as follows. Your 71 MK III should be equipped with a seven blade cooling fan and the thermostatic fan clutch behind the blade MUST positively engage this blade on the warm and hot days at idle and low speeds as necessary to pull large amounts of air through the radiator. These two components are many times overlooked or NOT diagnosed correctly. The original three pass radiator in your car is of a capacity that will handle any driving condition in North America. If it was ever replaced with a lesser capacity rad. or if the possibility exists that it could have some blocked passageways it must be removed and properly serviced by a good known rad. shop. Always choose your radiator shop wisely as we have found that while there are many excellent ones out there, sadly some poor quality shops can do more harm than good. Of course the rest of the cooling system should have a good history of maintenance and coolant flushing etc. and the correct working engine thermostat and radiator cap should be in place. A small overlooked item such as a faulty rad. cap can spew coolant from the cooling system and give the illusion of an overheated engine. Good luck with your diagnosis and if you have any further information to provide us regarding the situation please let us know.

Sincerely,

Bill

April 8, 2013

1965 Continental Convertible Power Window Relay

Good afternoon Bill,

I'm currently in year two of a major restoration/build of a 1965 Continental Convertible. Most of the OEM parts we've bought came from you guys. Powertrain and Drivetrain have been upgraded to a Fuel Injected 521 Big Block Ford, GM 4L80E, and a Ford 9". The dash has been customized and we're about ready to finish the build just in time for the upcoming 2013 Hot Rod Power Tour. My question to you is, where is this window safety relay? I've been searching all over this thing and with all the new equipment, it has been rather interesting. I've come to the conclusion that the only reason my window system isn't fully operational is this safety relay. The windows will only work with the bypass. We have zero ignition power at any switch, which from what I gather, gets its source from the safety relay. I've read it's located behind the glove box, by all the circuit breakers on the right kick panel, near the A-Post, under the passenger fender well, etc. Well, behind the glove box consists of a Vintage Air A/C Unit and the dash has been fully digitized. Zero factory vacuum systems remain in the vehicle, including the tilt and door locks. So the old plugs still exist and at the moment just hanging until I can complete the rest of the wiring.

I appreciate your time,

-Randy

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Hi Randy -

That is an ambitious project. The original power window safety relay on a 1965 Lincoln is located behind the right kickpad panel near the passenger area foot well. The easiest access however is to remove the right splash shield behind the right front wheel. The relay can be found near the power antenna area.

Sincerely,

Bill

April 2, 2013

1959 Lincoln Premiere Fuel Pump Questions & Follow Up

Bill,

I just bought a 1959 Lincoln Premiere that has an electric fuel pump incorrectly mounted in the engine bay. It does not work properly. I have the original, mechanical fuel pump in good condition with good gaskets. My plan was to restore the car to original and put the mechanical pump back in. However, I keep reading that the fuel pump push rod and eccentric are prone to premature failure.

With your experience on these cars, is it generally unreliable to run the mechanical pump? Should I just mount a quality electric pump back by the tank and call it good?

Thanks!

-Jake

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Hello Jake -

At Lincoln Land we believe in restoring the original mechanical fuel pump system completely as designed and then installing the electric fuel pump as a back up device. When you do it this way the electric pump can also be used to prime the carburetor on those occasions when your vehicle has sat unused for a period of time. Priming the carburetor of course saves excess cranking of the engine before starting. We really like this idea because also there is always the risk of an electric pump failure and leaving you stranded.

Sincerely,

Bill

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Bill,

Sounds excellent. Thank you for the advice. Should I replace the fuel pump pushrod and eccentric as a precaution, or is that usually unnecessary? (Id like to avoid pulling the timing cover off if possible.) Also, should I expect about 6-7 psi from the stock pump at idle?

Thanks!

-Jake

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Jake -

The decision to replace certain " hard to get to" parts only as a precaution is a personal choice that only you should make as we have no idea of the condition of your present fuel pump drive parts or the history of the engine maintenance. If you do decide to proceed you should also consider replacing other parts that you will be removing and uncovering such as the water pump, fan clutch and timing chain and gears etc. Personally I would only replace the fuel pump push rod at this time as it can be done with the front cover intact.

Our shop manual indicates a fuel pump pressure testing specification of 4-6 lbs. Are you working on this Lincoln without a Shop Manual? We hope that the above advice helps you make the correct decisions for your repair.

Sincerely,

Bill

1966 Continental Lighting Issues

Bill -

Just bought a 1966 Lincoln, all the lights come on yet have I have no turn signals or break lights on passenger side once I step on pedal. Would the hazard switch missing in glove box cause this problem? I've replaced all flashers and bulbs in car.

Thanks,

DDB

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DBB -

If one side of the vehicle has stop lights and turn signals and the other side does not I would be leaning towards a Turn Signal Switch problem or that someone has altered the wiring in an effort to repair the circuit without consulting the wiring diagram. I would begin by tracing the power path from the brake light switch, brake relay and through the t/s switch with the use of the correct wiring diagram for the car. If your 1966 Lincoln is equipped with the Tilt Steering wheel option the turn signal switch will be adjustable and located in the lower steering column area. At that time you could also trace out and repair the Hazard Light circuit with the aid of the same wiring diagram. While tracing the circuits be on the lookout for non factory altered or spliced wiring etc. The absence of the hazard light switch in the glove box is a mystery though. I would wonder why anyone would remove it and not want that feature to function.

Sincerely,

Bill