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March 27, 2013

1978 Mark V Solenoid Issues

Bill,

I have read most if not all of your posts on your blog. I have an issue with the car. I have replaced:

Starter
Alternator
Solenoid
Voltage Regulator
Grounds
Ignition Switch

Battery is charged with 12.5 Volts.

When you first start the car, everything is great. After the car gets to operating temp of just hot, you turn the key off and wait a minute. Restart the car and the starter stays engaged.

I have replaced the solenoid 4-5 times on this car within the last 2 months. The car has not been driven more than 200 miles in that time. Most of this is while it was sitting in my driveway while we continued to trace wires and replace bad grounds.

To no avail..I thought I would ask for some help from someone who knows these cars. That would be you..;-)

Thanks for any help you can provide,

John

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Hello John -

At Lincoln Land we have also experienced solenoid problems such as you are describing. Have you been using the same brand during these failures? We have found that some solenoids have been of a low quality or inconsistant quality from some suppliers. I would first check though if the wire that activates the solenoid is in fact at 0 volts when the ignition key is released from the cranking position to the run position. If it remains at battery voltage after the engine starts and the key is in the run position the starter of course will remain on and cranking. This test of course must be done and is only useful when the issue is occuring. We have also found that a high starter draw, a dragging starter, an undercapacity or failing battery can surprisingly cause some solenoids to overheat and fail. Another item that is often overlooked and easy to overlook is the battery cables and starter cables. Some faulty cables as well as grounds can appear real fine but be in fact bad. Some of the above can cause a solenoid to fail in the closed position (contacts inside have overheated and fused closed) so therefore I would revisit some items that you may have already checked. Finally do not overlook the possibility that a newly rebuilt starter could be drawing too much power and causing the solenoids to fail. I hope that the above helps you to solve the problem.

Sincerely,

Bill

March 25, 2013

1970 Mark III Brake Questions & Update

Hi Bill,

Questions for you, 1 - What would make a humming/ vibrating sound from drivers front brake when starting off from a start going about 10-15 miles per hr when the noise appears I step on the brake and it stops and I let go and starts again but not all the time. All new brakes and calipers there was 2 clips on back of caliper top and bottom I couldn't put one of them back on because the hole was broken so I only put one on? I just put her on the road for second time and it just started, probably 40 miles on the brakes .sometimes when I hit a nice bump I hear it for a split second? 2- I put a fuel sending unit in w/low fuel warning it was working fine until now when I start the car I see the warning come on briefly and goes out the car starts. I haven't check voltage yet one wire should have no power, one should have constant power and one blinking. If I have all of these were should I go from there? would it be the sending unit even though its new?

Part two:

Hi Bill, just a little up date the sound is more like a low air horn vibrating humming noise. Now that I'm thinking about this would it be the brake booster?

Part three:

Sorry for so many emails failed to mention I have a new master cycllnder from cardone and I see some seepage where the master cycl. meets the booster and the sure brake plug is disconnected from solenoid. Trying to give you as much info as I can. It seems to happen when I drive it more and is hot from driving.

Phil

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Phil -

You have a strange noise in your brakes after you yourself has admitted to omitting the installation of a necessary part. I have no idea what this noise is but it sounds to me at first glance that you have answered your own question. Have you thought about repairing the missing brake clip part so that it can work as designed.

As far as answering your fuel gauge comment and question I don't understand it at all. What exactly is wrong with your gauge.

Sincerely,

Bill

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Bill -

Gauge is not registering, the clip I don't think is the problem. A mechanic thinks it is the booster, white blue smoke coming out on start up when that didn't happen before. He thinks the diaphram is bad, making the fog horn sound along with sucking brake fluid in the vacuum giving it a rough idle and sometimes runs like s**t what do you think?

Phil

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Phil -

So, as I understand it your fuel gauge needle on the dash is not moving at all after it was working fine for a period of time with the new sending unit. The new sending unit may have failed or the float may have detached or developed a leak and become saturated with fuel. In any case the issue must be correctly Diagnosed with the use of the Shop Manual for reference. A good place to start this diagnosis would be at the fuel tank plug at the sending unit.

As for your brake noise problem you have been very confusing to say the least. In your first post you did explain clearly that you had a noise from the left front brake assembly. I replied to you according to the information that you supplied to the best of my knowledge. Your latest email indicates that this left front brake noise has somehow now seemed to have evolved to a fog horn sound at the brake booster along with leaks and white blue smoke from somewhere. Please keep us posted and let us know what you eventually find what your problem was.

Sincerely,

Bill

March 22, 2013

1966 Continental Timing Chain And Gears

Bill -

Great site. How many hours does it usually take to change the timing chain and gears on a 66 Lincoln A/C car with the motor in the car? Or is there any way [other than removing the timing cover] to check if they have been up graded to the steel set. My car is running fine, just a slight miss, worried it may still have the nylon gear set. 52,000 verified original miles.

Thanks,

Greg

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Hi Greg -

The book time to replace the timing chain and gears is 4.8 hours and this time quote includes R and R the oil pan. If the oil pan is removed during the operation it can be cleaned and the timing gear plastic pieces can be removed if necessary. The actual time that the job will take can widely vary and is always dependent on the skill and experience of the mechanic.

Some owners have claimed that the condition of their gears can be seen by rotating the crankshaft CW and CCW while observing and looking for a corresponding movement of the distributor rotor. What you observe may only be normal timing chain wear though. If you have no knowledge or history of the engine's maintenance and are sufficiently worried then you would need to remove the front cover and check the condition up close to be sure. With the cover off you also should consider the condition and age of the water pump, fan clutch, damper pulley and the power steering pump seals etc. When deciding whether or not to embark in this operation you should of course consider how you are using the car. If you are using it around town and not too far away from home then the choice to proceed would of course be much less urgent. If you are driving on long trips and concerned of a timing gear failure then your better choice may be to inspect the gear to put your mind at ease. It is a personal decision. Hope this helps.

Sincerely,

Bill

March 19, 2013

1970 Mark III AC Questions and Follow Up

Bill -

Just bought my first 1970 Mark , my father had 2 when I was young, and he has since past. I bought it in memory of him. Anyway here is the question - my ac engages (clutch) any time I move the auto temp control to heat, ac, defog, or deice - even if I put the temp to 85 any things I should check indoor dash sensor?

Phil

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Phil -

Congratulations on your recent purchase. Those 69-71 Marks are really great cars. Your compressor sounds to be operating as designed. The compressor will be engaged in all positions except OFF or if the ambient temperature is below approximately 35 degrees F. This system is a REHEAT design that cools and dehumidifies the incoming air to the lowest temperature and humidity and then reheats the air in order to maintain the comfort level that you have the temperature lever adjusted to. The complete interesting operation is detailed in the Shop Manual. This manual is also a valuable asset to any owners of older cars who wish to perform any repair procedures to their vehicle.

Sincerely,

Bill

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Bill -

Great , when I bought it, the suction line was very loose with no freon in it. I pressure tested the system and it held with 125 lbs. of nitrogen in it for a 1/2 hour so I let the nitrogen out and before I proceed do you think I have to replace the drier/receiver?

Phil

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Phil -

In theory and in accordance with good refrigeration practices yes the receiver drier should be replaced. New driers are also more compatable with the newer refrigerants. You have purchased a vehicle with an ac system that has had a loose line for who knows how long in time or if it was ever open or even loose enough for the system to become moisture contaminated. You also do not know the condition of the compressor or the expansion valve etc. The system could be charged with refrigerant as a test now in order to evaluate the performance and condition etc. but I would check the oil in the compressor first. You might get lucky or you could be faced with replacing some components that have failed. We wish you good luck with this repair.

Sincerely,

Bill

March 18, 2013

1966 Issues Bleeding Brakes

Hi Bill,

I'm going nuts on a '66 HT. The old master cylinder was shot and in need of replacement so I installed (2) new Centric units and a new Raybestos unit. The problem I'm having is bleeding it.

I've been at this (cars) for 30+ years and have probably replaced 100+ master cylinders but have never run into a problem like this old slab-sided beast is throwing at me. I simply CANNOT seem to get the air out of the system. All three master cylinders have exhibited the exact same problem. I have the FSM here for it and measured the push rod and is to the factory spec (I think it was .995 inches). I used a piece of tape to hold the button on the metering valve down and started at the right rear.

On the right rear, I just kept getting more and more air while bleeding (with the first unit I bled almost 2 quarts thru the system). I finally gave up on that cylinder but got the same results with the following two. Even using the bleeder screw on the master cylinder, with each pump of the pedal, I get a fresh shot of air followed by fluid. It almost seems that it's sucking air past the piston seal on every return stroke of the master cylinder.

All the brake lines have been replaced and I've been over and under this beast multiple times and cannot find any leaks anywhere... Any suggestions before I admit defeat???????????????????????

Thanks

Lee

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Hello Lee -

The following is for a 1966 Lincoln with the original brake equipment, and assuming that replacement parts are correct. We do not depress the metering valve when bleeding because of the risk of a future leak at the valve. The valve would then need replacement or overhaul. We usually bench bleed the master cylinder and then with an assistant at the brake pedal we bleed the four corners in sequence until all of the air is purged. If you have tried this without success please contact us by telephone and ask for Erik or Bill for further advice.

Sincerely,

Bil & Erik

March 13, 2013

1963 Continental Fuel Issues

Bill -

I just bought a 63 Continental It was parked for many years before I brought her home. Before it was parked it was rebuilt. So I did what most guys would do.. Put some new gas in it and try to start it! It started up and sounded great! I took her for a 30 mile trip and it ran and drove great...until I came up to a stop light and it died. I read up on the fuel pump issues so I put a new one in and boom it was running perfect....for a mile, then it started not getting fuel to the carb again. so I installed an inline pump with 4-7lbs of pressure. hooked it up and boom it ran great again!! until I get on the road. It runs perfect in the driveway giving it plenty of throttle and sounds great, looks like plenty of gas getting in there too. But when I get out on the road it starts to bog down like it starving for gas? I tuned it up with new points wires and plugs but no "condenser they needed to order one". My question is is there anything I have to do when installing the electric pump? Also what's the small gas line for coming from the tank that was hooked to the factory pump, do I need to do something with it? Its just weird because it ran so great before I started with the fuel pump "fixing" Thanks!!

Thanks,

Ryan

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Greetings Ryan -

You are dealing with a vehicle and engine that has not been running for many years. With this in mind you can expect issues that years of non use can create. To answer your two questions the electric fuel pump should be located and installed as per the instructions. We do not recommend installing an electric fuel pump as the main pump for fuel delivery. We would recommend using one as a back up though for the mechanical pump with a separate ON and OFF switch to be used in the event of a mechanical pump failure or for priming if an engine has been unused for a period of time. The extra fuel line was used on these engines as a means to alleviate vapor lock that FORD determined that could occur in some climates.

The biggest problem that should concern you at this time is rust, debris and old fuel being drawn from the gas tank and then subsequently through the carburetor. This can cause the issues that you describe. If you have tuned up the engine and have adjusted the points correctly, the condenser must be replaced as well as they are well known to fail suddenly and stop the engine. As you address these items patiently and one at a time things should slowly come together for you and the engine should run reliably for you. I would be checking first for rust through the fuel supply as from where I am this sounds to me to be the most likely problem with a vehicle that has sat unused for years as you have stated. When you have more information contact us again if you need parts to restore your fuel pump or further suggestions etc.

Sincerely,

Bill

March 12, 2013

1975 Mark IV Autolamp & Clock issues and follow up

Hi Bill

I'm writing from Switzerland and I find your blog very useful, however, i did not find the answer for my two kinda stupid questions.

My car is a 1975 Mark IV that has been imported to Switzerland when new, and its still in great shape. Its really an eye catcher compared to all those tiny little cars we have in europe ;-)

However, it has a few little issues. One of them is that the autolamp system is deactivated. Back in 75, Swiss authorities considered this illegal and had it deactivated. It always disturbed me, and as i had to service the blower motor now i bought the car shop manual and had a look at the autolamp. All the components are there: sensors, amplifier, even the rubber knob at the headlight switch. All the wiring seems to be where it should and the lights work perfectly when operated manually. I suspect that they removed the autolamp fuse, but i simply cannot find it. I felt like an idiot kneeling and lieing in that car and just not finding that damn fuse. So my very simple question: can u tell me where i find my fuse in this car?

The second issue is the clock. Its not running anymore. Some years ago, it moved a tiny little bit from time to time, but for at least 2 years its dead. I do not really care, but as i have all the dash removed now i wanted to see if its simply a dirty contact or another easy fix. In the manual its written that I have to reach under the instrument panel and disconnect the speedometer cable connector to remove the instrument cluster. I see the cable and the connector, but I cannot disconnect it. Is there a special trick to do it? I realised already that most of the connectors in my car are strong as hell, but I'm afraid to apply brute force to the speedometer cable...

Many thanks from a great Lincoln enthusiast -

Severin

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Severin -

You may find another in line fuse for the automatic headlight dimmer near the fuse panel.... We have enclosed a diagram for your fuses. The speedometer cable is disconnected from the speedometer head behind the dash by depressing the nylon tab at the head and pulling back. Hope this helps....

Bill -

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Hey -

Just a little feedback..
it all went totally easy after knowing what i had to do :-)

yesterday i put together everything, and now the autolamp as well as the original clock are working again. Thanks!!

Severin