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1969 Mark III Issues

Bill,

I have a dilemma. I just finished restoration of our beautiful 69 Mark III. Every aspect was NOS with many thanks going to Lincolnland. It was a 5 year process. It is prepped for concours show. Funny story now, it is complete and it will not run. After 100 miles on the new motor it would just stop running, it would restart if I poured fuel down the carb
repeatedly. In the next 100 miles this problem got worse. After the 3rd new fuel pump I knew something was up. The fuel pump eccentric is not functioning. I expect the flat key has sheared. I am so disgusted I lost sleep over it. I fear that tearing down the front end of the motor will lead to scratches bumps and bruises. Everything was detailed down to
individual washers and bolts. The troublesome power steering pump doesn't
leak a drop though it took 3 attempts to get it perfect. The agony of this!! I am considering adding a electric 12V fuel pump with 4-5psi and bypass the mechanical fuel. Would I be foolish doing this? My mechanic says I should go with the electric fuel pump. I think he is in fear of the $6000 paint job too and the exquiste detail on the engine. What would you and Chris do????????????

Patrick, cursing expletives in east Texas.

Bill,

Let me add here in east Texas I only have ethanol for fuel nothing else is available. I have been having vapor lock problems with all 4 Lincolns, the Thunderbird and my Studebaker. It is 90-110 degrees 6 months out of the year anymore. The heat build up under the hoods is tremendous and we have had to sit for hours waiting for the cool down so as to get the cars started again. This was another reason I thought maybe I should give in and put a elec.fuel pump on at least one car and see how it goes. I've always been a stickler for 100% original but maybe I need to give in. Your thoughts are valued !

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Hello Patrick -

I have read both your first and second emails to us and will consider both in the reply. Your question "what would Chris and you do" is a good one because if it did happen to one of our cars in Florida here we would certainly discuss the options. If your diagnosis is correct and the fuel pump eccentric has failed and become non operative for some unknown reason as you describe, Chris and I would be concerned as to what further problems a loose eccentric and its associated parts etc. could possibly cause to the front of the engine as you drive the car with an electric fuel pump installed. I think that I can truthfully say that these fuel pumps and actuator parts are not known to frequently fail when they are installed properly and torqued down correctly. I also realize that even the best assembled components can sometimes fail and surprise the best technicians.

You also indicate the frustrations that you are enduring with several vehicles due to the hot weather and your desire to try an electric fuel pump in order to find out if this would be a solution to the vapour lock issues. You and your mechanic are on location there in texas and he probably has experience with the modern inferior fuel problems that we are all experiencing with our older vehicles therefore I would say go ahead and try the electric fuel pump as an experiment but try to install it in a manner that would allow you to possibly remove it at a later date if you change your mind. I am also sure that your mechanic knows as we do here that the engine cooling system along with the cooling fan etc. must absolutely be in excellent operating condition for proper engine cooling in extreme ambient temperatures.

To sum up, if you and your mechanic are convinced that an electric fuel pump is the answer to the vapour lock in your location give it a try but we would be concerned what could develop later with the abandoned loose eccentric. Chris may have some further advice to add to this reply or he may send you a separate email. Good luck and please let us know what you decide to do.

Sincerely,

Bill