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May 31, 2011

1965 Overheating And Knocking

Hi Bill,

I have a 65 Continental with a 430. After driving around for a little while, the engine starts knocking while I accelerate. It doesn't do it at idle or while driving, just while accelerating, especially around turns.

I did do something stupid. I was showing the car off to a friend and left the A/C running while the engine was at idle. The car over heated, and I've noticed the knocking ever since then. The other problem I have is with over heating. The engine doesn't have a
shroud (original owner lied about not having it, long story), so I had a custom aluminum shroud with an 11" electric fan built. I thought that would take care of the over heating, but it operated exactly the same.

I have replaced the thermostat, but not the water pump, or radiator. I have ran water through engine and it comes out just fine, with no back pressure. I have also ran water through the radiator, again it flowed just fine. I'm considering replacing the radiator, thinking the inner workings of the radiator might be clogged up.

Any advice will be appreciated. I have numerous other issues, but those two are really
keeping me from enjoying driving Violet around. :)

Thank you for your help and your time.


Josh
Norman, OK

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Greetings Josh -

I'm sorry to hear about your recent engine problems. It does sound from your description that your engine has been under a lot of stress and has reacted accordingly. In my opinion the overheating condition should have been properly addressed at a much earlier date. The description of "engine knock" takes in a lot of territory and needs to be examined by a competent technician with the proper test equipment. We of course cannot determine from here if the knock is a carbon related knock, upper engine tap or perhaps an engine bearing knock therefore an on scene inspection and an accurate diagnosis is necessary.

If your engine is actually overheating and from your description it is, this issue must be addressed as soon as possible. When your Lincoln was delivered to the first owner the cooling system was capable of properly cooling the engine in any weather condition in any State in the U.S.A. I have always believed in maintaining the the original cooling system to an optimum condition in any vehicle. Any deviations such as you have done are o/k as a personal touch ONLY if it works and the other basic components are in GOOD shape. The other basic components consist of among other items the radiator, the water pump, fan blade and its clutch and the engine coolant passages. The radiator could easily be partially plugged up along with the engine coolant chambers. What you observe flowing through the radiator could well be only 40% of what a clean rad. is capable of passing and cooling. A good radiator shop can remove the end tanks and "rod out" the rad or "recore" it completely. I don't know what your fan shroud looks like but your mention of an 11" electric fan in my opinion is woefully undersized for that radiator and engine.

I hope that the above helps you get started on the road to recovery and if you need any original parts or specifications do not hesitate to contact us further.

Sincerely,

Bill

May 20, 2011

1985 Town Car Autolamp Update - Interior Trim Questions

Hi Bill,

Thanks for your response. The head lights do come on manually. I have a manual, however it was unclear to me as to the to the next step to getting the autolamp to work.

Another question I have on my 85 Town Car is the common problem of the interior door panels. Two of the door panels are just starting to crack due to age not wear. They make door overlays and the local upholstery guy would try to fix it. Please let me know what is your opinion on repairs for interior door panels.

Regards,

Scott

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Hi Scott -

If you have the FoMoCo shop manual the diagnosis is fairly well stated. Which manual do you have and what steps are unclear to you. We may be able to help with better factory information. Sometimes a trained eye is also needed to clear up certain diagnostic procedures. There is also a possibility that some of your "used" parts may be defective and they may need to be sent in to us for some tests.

We have been successful to a point with certain repairs to many interior trim panels. Would it be possible for you to send us pictures so that we can better assess yours? We also have a limited selection of good used ones that may prove to be a better choice for you.

Sincerely,

Bill

May 19, 2011

1985 Town Car Autolamp Problems

Hi Bill,

I have a 1985 Town Car Signature Series with 34,000 original miles.The auto-lamp doesn't work. I have replaced both relays on the fender well, one for the auto-lamp, and one for the auto hi-beam, and I checked the fuse. I replaced the headlight switch and found a couple photo cells in the junk yard and still it doesn't work. Please let me know if you have any suggestions.

Regards,

Scott

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Greetings Scott -

If all of those used parts that you have installed are in good working order, and you have replaced the correct relays and fuse etc., then you should perform the diagnosis as outlined in the Shop Manual.

Do the headlamps operate manually? The Manual suggests as a first step to turn the Autolamp switch to the Off position and to operate the headlamps manually. If they do not operate manually then you would need to check out the simpler manual non Autolamp circuit. If the headlamps operate OK manually, then you need to continue with the Autolamp diagnosis.

We may have the necessary diagnosis information available if you require it. I hope that the above helps you.

Sincerely,

Bill

May 17, 2011

1978 Mark Hard To Start When Cold

Hi Bill,

I have a '78 Mark V, with a 400 engine, from California. It has become very hard to start at times when cold. It will turns over fine. When trying to start I depress the pedal to the floor and slowly release as per the owners manual. The car almost starts but won't run. On the second attempt I have tried holding the pedal to the floor, 1/4 throttle and not depressing the throttle but no go. When I leave it for about an hour it fires up great without touching the pedal. It acts as though it is flooded but holding the pedal to the floor does not allow it to start. When warm it starts great and when it does start it runs fine. I have pulled the spark plugs out when it won't fire and they do smell of fuel. The plugs are correct as per the local Ford dealership. It has an electric choke. Does the choke need adjustment? It did start just fine, seldom on the first attempt but always on the second attempt. The ambient temperature has gone up since I bought the car, early spring temps were around 0-5 Celsius to 15-20 Celsius. Could this also be a factor?

Thanks,

Carman

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Hi Carman -

Welcome to the forum. The first check for this problem is to remove the air cleaner before a cold start and observe the cold choke operation while manually operating the accelerator linkage. The choke butterfly valve should snap closed to allow for a fast start with a rich mixture and then open slightly upon starting and continue to slowly open fully as the engine warms up. If the choke circuit is o/k and requires no repair then you must check to find out if you have fuel immediately available in the carburetor. If not, a fuel pump and fuel system test is in order.

For a cold engine we usually give the accelerator pedal a couple of quick pumps to set the choke, the fast idle and to pump some fuel through the carb for a rich mixture and a fast start. Assuming that your ignition and other" tune up" components are in good order you must also have the proper choke and fuel operation as described above. I hope that the above helps you to future quick starts.

Sincerely,

Bill

1977 Mark V Engine Dies Out

Hello Bill -

I have a 1977 Lincoln Mark V which I have stored in my garage for several years, stopped driving it because all of a sudden the car developed a problem when traveling down the road then its engine would die. I have replaced all the electrical components.............wires, cap, rotor, modular, coil............not the condenser.....yet I still have the same problem. I will pull off to the side of the road..............then the engine will start up after a couple of minutes. Then drive a while longer until it once more dies.

What else can I replace in the electrical system that would eliminate this problem? This is NOT a CA car.

Thanks for your advice,

Tom

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Hi Tom -

The 77 Mark V is usually a reliable car and when these kinds of problems appear it is difficult to find a technician who is well versed in the all areas under the hood. I believe that the key for your repair lies with a correct diagnosis. Your description of a good running engine that suddenly quits and then restarts in that manner could have a fuel or ignition problem. If it is a fuel problem you or your mechanic should suspect a fuel delivery problem to the carburetor and a good place to start is at the fuel pump with a fuel pressure and volume test. Assuming though that you are correct and that the problem is in the ignition system you should be aware that your Mark has a very reliable solid state electronic ignition set up that was considered state of the art in 1977. These systems can and do fail with age and use. The system consists of electronic components that are located inside the distributor and under the hood at the fender apron area. The operation and diagnosis is described in the Shop Manuals.

Again Tom, the key here is to get an accurate diagnosis in your location performed by a good technician to avoid replacing items that do not need to be replaced. If we can help you further with advice or parts please do not hesitate to call on us.

Sincerely,

Bill

May 6, 2011

1979 Continental Hot Start Issues

Hello Bill,

I have a 79 Continental Collector Series W/ the 400. After the engine is at operating temp and I let her sit for a few minutes, when I go to restart her I get the (RA RA RA) slow turn over like it's either too hot or the timing is too far advanced or maybe a problem with the starter. I have replaced the starter,battery, checked the temp with a digital thermometer, checked the cables. Checked the timing and just recently the timing chain and gears. ( Motor has over 200,000 I'm sure and it was very loose) I thought for sure this was my problem but alas it's the same as before. I have over 30 tears as a professional mechanic but this has got me stumped. Other than that she runs just fine. Please help.

Thanx,

Jim

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Hello Jim,

Welcome to our blog. Some of those slow cranking hot start conditions can be a real pain. The vehicles of the seventies were just getting started with fancy ignition and engine controls and were evolving constantly. You stated that you have a new battery, starter and that the cables are o/k. I would first want to make absolutely sure that the battery is the correct size for that 400 cid engine and that is fully charged and PROPERLY load tested. The starter as well should be tested HOT for a high draw and the cables and any engine ground straps should be carefully re-inspected. I know that you believe that all of the above is o/k BUT new parts do fail and if by chance something simple with the above is missed or ignored you may be led down some expensive and time consuming path.

Another item to consider is the base timing. Dampers on some engines are known to slip on their rubber internals which then can cause a wrong timing reading. If your engine was over advanced, hard hot cranking and starting could be a result. The original FoMoCo DURASPARK ignition and engine management on that engine was designed carefully for that engine along with several sensors and vacuum items. All of these management parts contribute to the operation of the engine. If you do remove or bypass any items or replace any electronics with aftermarket parts, you should be careful with choice of brand name and know what you are doing.

You also state Jim that your engine has over 200,000 miles on it. I would be interested to know what the engine oil pressure is with the engine at HOT operating temperature. I hope that the above suggestions help and that you find something simple. If you are still having problems, post back to us with that Hot oil pressure if it is low and I will tell about the strange hot start problem and repair that I had to do on my 70 Sedan.

Sincerely,

Bill

May 4, 2011

Questions On Removing Trim On A 1973 Continental

Hi Bill,

My name is Steve. I want to have my '73 Lincoln Continental repainted ,and I'm removing all the chromed stuff from the exterior. I'm struggling with the headlight covers and the "CONTINENTAL" letters on the front. The book does not mention how to remove them.I could use a little help.

Thanks for all that you're doing for us, Lincoln fans here on this site.

Steve

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Hi Steve,

If the book that you are referring to is the owners manual, it will not show how the various mouldings are attached. The Factory maintenance manual however shows how most of the mouldings and scripts are attached. This is shown on page 47-02-01 of the volume 4 body manual. The Mark IV is also shown.

The "letters" are attached with barrel clips in the header panel. The headlamp doors are removed by unscrewing the two hex nuts on the pivot arms of the doors, once removed, they should pull straight out.

If you are in need of the proper manuals for your car, we can arrange for a set to be sent out to you. The correct manuals usually pay for themselves during the first repair.

Sincerely,

Bill

1978 Town Car Blower Issues

Hi Bill,

I have two beauties. A 1979 Town Car in need of some body work, and a 1978 that's as close to perfect for a 33 year old survivor. When I got the 79, the blower motor only worked on high, and after some research, I found it was as simple as the air conditioner fuse. Replaced it, and she blew as cold as she could, at all speeds.

My problem is I just bought the 78 and same issue. I figured "no problem. Replace the fuse when I get her home, and she'll work". Nope. No go. I did not have a circuit tester, so I swapped out the under hood/firewall mounted resisters and tested. Still only high fan. Have you seen this before? Could the issue be with the fuse box?

Perplexed,

Marc

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Hi Marc -

Your blower problem is a common complaint item on many cars as they age. The most common failure in the blower circuit on your Lincoln is the High Blower Relay or its connections which are located under the hood on the firewall.

At Lincoln Land we would usually start diagnosing in this easy to access area. When the high speed is engaged it sends battery power direct to the blower through a fuse link. When the lower speeds are selected the relay hands off the circuit to its lower contacts and the blower switch and resistor circuit. A test light and a shop manual are usually a requirement to quickly diagnose this circuit. If necessary we can rebuild these relays for you. Let us know if you need any further advice or possibly a set of shop manuals for this and any future repairs.

Sincerely,

Bill