" /> Bill's Corner: December 2010 Archives

« November 2010 | Main | January 2011 »

December 20, 2010

1973 Continental Timing Chain Questions

Hi Bill,

This is Steve again.I checked my thermostat in my '73 Lincoln Continental and I saw that it was stuck in the open position. I just replaced it last year. Now I replaced it again and it works fine. I have another question: My 73 Lincoln has 96,000 miles on it and I wonder if there is a way to find out if the timing chain was ever replaced on it, or if I need to replace it at all. Is there a way to check if it's worn out without taking it apart? I heard something like you have to turn the crankshaft by hand and watch if there is a dead play compared to the distributor rotor. It's a big job, that's why I ask. If I'll have to, is there a timing chain kit brand that you recommend?

Thanks,

Steve

---------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------

Hi Steve -

We're really pleased that you have found and repaired the cold engine problem. The timing chain and gear concern is a topic that has many opinions.... Some will advise that one should "not even drive" an older recently purchased car without tearing the front cover off and replacing these parts. It has been my experience however that a vehicle that has been maintained properly and driven in a non aggressive manner will not require immediate replacement simply because of the experience of other car owners. Vehicles that have been idle for years with old acidic oil sitting in their engines as well as those that have been exposed to heavy acceleration may indeed require replacement (or not). If you are embarking on a long journey with your car, and are really worried, or strongly suspect a problem in this area, then a replacement might be a good choice. The brand name of a good kit can also be a matter of opinion but I would definitely not buy on price. I would want to buy a "made in the U.S.A." product from a trusted supplier. We hope that the above helps you with the correct choice.

Sincerely,

Bill

1991 Town Car Belt Issue

Hello Bill -

It's been awhile. I have a 1991 Lincoln Town Car that "eats" a the single belt about once a year. We replaced the alternator awhile back and discovered that we had to change the alternator pulley because of the belt's groove configuration. However, I have had to replace the belt within the last 2 weeks after about a year's use. The engine side of the belt was coming apart. It has been suggested to replace the belt tension pulley system as it may be pushing the belt unevenly. Any thoughts or suggestions on this?

Thanks,

Gregg

---------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------

Hi Gregg -

Welcome back to the blog. Replacing a serpentine belt every year is excessive unless you are running up many,many miles. I can offer the following suggestions without actually viewing your engine. The alignment of ALL of the pulleys and idlers to each other must be correct or the belt will continually Scuff in one area and wear out prematurely. The pulleys themselves must also ALL be correct for that 1991 engine. Finally, I recommend only a Premium quality belt be used. A competent well "seasoned" technician should be able to inspect any of the above for you and locate your problem. I hope that these suggestions help you discover an easy to repair defect. Please let us know what you find.

Sincerely,

Bill

December 14, 2010

1971 Mark III Shifting Issues

Hi Bill

I have a problem whit my automatic transmission of my 1971 Mark 3. It looks like my transmission will not shift in gear properly? If I drive the car my gear will not shift up like it is supposed to do?? It will only shift up when I go down on the throttle, as soon as I let the throttle go and the rpm goes down it will shift into the next gear. I have to do this with all gear's. I also sometimes (lets say always !) have to move the gear lever up en down a couple of times to get the best position to go in to his drive gear. I have checked my vacuum hose and it has vacuum on it?? I hope you have some answers for me.

Greetings,

Ray
The Netherlands

---------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------

Hello Ray -

Welcome to the Lincoln Land blog. If I am understanding you correctly I think that you should first check the vacuum line which is located at the Modulator valve under the car at the right rear of the transmission. The steel line and rubber hose should not be damaged or deteriorated in any way and adequate engine vacuum should be available there with NO evidence of transmission fluid in the lines. Any internal leaks at the Modulator will require that a new Modulator valve will be needed. Secondly the transmission "kick-down" Rod should be inspected (with the engine OFF) for proper operation at full throttle position of the carburetor and for a return to the idle position (by a separate spring located at the carburetor) when the carburetor linkage is allowed to return back to the engine idle position. If this rod does NOT return as designed, the transmission is locked in a full throttle position. This Rod is located at the left side of the carburetor and connects to the transmission via linkage at the left side of the transmission. The above two items are important controls for the shifting of your transmission and are the first items that we at Lincoln Land would be examining on a vehicle with a shift problem such as you describe. As far as a problem with shifting into DRIVE is concerned, you should check and adjust your manual shift linkage as required as well as inspect for loose bushings etc., in this linkage. I hope that the above leads you to a speedy repair and if you should require any parts or further advice etc. we are at your service.

Sincerely,

Bill

December 10, 2010

The '63 Won't Start....

Hi Bill,

I have owned my Lincoln for 12 years now and in the recent 3 years I haven't driven the car and now she wont start.

Before turning the car over I did the following: Drained and replaced all the fluids, including gas, oil, and power steering. I then replaced all the spark plugs and applied a little WD40 to each piston, then manually cranked over the engine about 30 rotations.

Here's the issues I am having.

1. Tried to turn the car over and a wiff of smoke came out from the fuse box and the ignition switch got hot and also produced a wiff of smoke. The key is now stuck and I cannot remove it. I tried sticking a metal rod into the hole next to the key but nothing has made it budge so far. We checked all of the fuses and none of them have popped.

Question to you: Do have any suggestions on what may have been smoking and should I replace any of the relays near the fuse panel.

2. I towed the car to a mechanic and today and he began by replacing the starter cycloid. When cranking the car over using the cycloid we are NOT getting any spark to the distributor.

One of the mechanics feels that it's the coil.

Question to you: Do you have any suggestions we should look at other than the coil?

And one last question, can you tell me where the ballast resister located?

Thanks so much for your time!

Best regards and happy holidays,

Don

---------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------

Greetings Don -

The ignition Resistor is encapsulated within the wiring harness under the dash and inline with the ignition switch wiring. If you are not familiar, a correct wiring diagram is necessary for reference.

As for the rest of your non starting problems you need to approach the situation with a logical sequence of testing in mind. As well as an excellent battery, starter, compression and wiring, you need proper (fresh) Fuel and Ignition in order for an engine to start and run. The above tests should be easy for a competent mechanic to accurately perform WITHOUT GUESSING. If your diagnosing provides you with more information on the problem please contact us further if you need to.

Sincerely,

Bill

December 6, 2010

Update 1973 Lincoln Warm Up Issues

Hi Bill!

It's Steve again with the 73 Lincoln warm up problem. I checked the engine during warm up, I took the radiator cap off while the engine was still cold and I saw that the coolant was circulating in the radiator. It's not supposed to do that, is it? The circulation in the radiator should start when the engine warms up and the thermostat opens up in the upper hose, right? I think my thermostat is open all the time. It's a brand new one, and I replaced it because I was having the same problem; slow warm up. Can it be installed in the other way, backwards?

Thanks,

Steve

***************************************************************************************************************

Hi Steve -

If you can see coolant vigorously circulating through the radiator tubes at the filler neck with the cap off after start up and with the engine definitely COLD as you describe, then you are correct in your diagnosis. The thermostat is either faulty or nonexistent. A thermostat installed upside down usually results in overheating because the heat sensing element in the thermostat would then be sensing the cooler coolant at the upper radiator hose instead of the hotter coolant at the intake manifold passages. This would cause it to remain closed longer. I would purchase a new Premium quality thermostat rated at 190 degrees and replace your present seized or defective one. Let us know how it works out for you.

Sincerely,

Bill